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President of Rockefeller Foundation:
President Emerita Rodin

President emerita Judith Rodin, has been named president of the Rockefeller Foundation, the New York-based international philanthropic organization dedicated to improving the lives of the world's poor. The 91-year-old Foundation has approximately $3 billion in assets making it the nation's 13th largest foundation last year. The Rockefeller Foundation has a staff of some 180 employees in the U.S., Kenya, Thailand and at its study and conference center in Italy. The Foundation uses most of its resources to alleviate global issues such as poverty, housing, hunger and health as well as revitalizing distressed urban areas in the U.S. Dr. Rodin will become Rockefeller's 13th president and its first woman president, in March 2005. The Foundation's current president, Gordon Conway, will retire at the end of this year and return to Britain after serving for over six years.

"The Foundation's board of trustees is privileged to appoint Judy Rodin as the next president of the Rockefeller Foundation," James F. Orr  III, chair of the board and head of the search committee, said. "Judy is an energetic, visionary leader whose accomplishments extend from community revitalization and management of a complex health care system, to establishing new research institutes and launching innovative programs. We know that Judy will provide the leadership to guide the Foundation as it continues its mission of reducing poverty around the world."

"I am deeply honored to be given this opportunity to lead an organization committed to using knowledge-based initiatives to improve the lives of poor and excluded people throughout the world," said Dr. Rodin. "Over the years, the Rockefeller Foundation has used its resources effectively to develop groundbreaking initiatives designed to address some of the world's most pressing problems by focusing on the root cause of social ills."

The Rockefeller Foundation is credited with funding the development of the vaccine to prevent yellow fever, establishing the first schools of public health in the U.S. and the first medical school in China, and supporting the establishment of Lincoln Center in New York City.

 

 


  Almanac, Vol. 51, No. 2, September 7, 2004

ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS:

Tuesday,
September 7, 2004
Volume 51 Number 2
www.upenn.edu/almanac

 

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