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Julie Fairman: Class of 1940 Bicentennial Endowed Term Chair

J. Fairman

Dr. Julie A. Fairman, associate professor of nursing, has been named to the Class of 1940 Bicentennial Endowed Term Chair effective July 1, 2004. 

According to Dr. Afaf Meleis, dean of the School of Nursing, "Dr. Fairman is an innovative teacher, a dedicated citizen of the University and School of Nursing communities, and an outstanding scholar at the forefront of nursing history. Her appointment to the Bicentennial Class of 1940 Endowed Term Chair is suited to her dedicated citizenship, her outstanding scholarship at the forefront of nursing history, and, most importantly, as an inspiring teacher who has developed innovative and meaningful experiences for students that combine nursing practice with community service.  Dr. Fairman is an exemplary role model to both students and faculty alike." 

A nursing historian, Dr. Fairman is currently interim director of the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing. In her teaching capacity, she has developed several innovative and meaningful experiences for her students that combined nursing practice with community service. To motivate her students to volunteer in the community, Dr. Fairman has instilled incentives such as boosting her students' cumulative grade for eight hours of volunteer work in community clinical agencies. Programs such as this succeeded in exposing her students to health care, serving under-served populations, and providing them with an understanding of the dynamics of government institutions. 

In 2003, Dr. Fairman was selected as the recipient of a course development grant from Penn's Center for Community Partnerships. Dr. Fairman used the grant to develop a new course, Concepts in Health: Promoting Healthy Life Styles in Urban Communities, in which practice and theory were linked to engage undergraduate students in significant research and service activities.

Dr. Fairman has assumed leadership of one of the Nursing School's core doctoral courses, Inquiry and Nursing, which introduces students to the process of intellectual inquiry. This critical course has helped stimulate a discourse that transforms the new students' view of themselves, the discipline of nursing, and the world of healthcare. Her contributions in other nursing courses in the areas of history of nursing, gender, and technology all contribute to shaping the School of Nursing's mission in the new millennium.  

 

 


  Almanac, Vol. 51, No. 11, November 9, 2004

ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS:

Tuesday,
November 9, 2004
Volume 51 Number 11
www.upenn.edu/almanac

 

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