Loading
Click for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Forecast
HOME ISSUE

CALENDAR

BETWEEN ISSUES ARCHIVE DEADLINES CONTACT USFAQS
 
 
Print This Issue
Front Page
Contents
Crimes
Directory
All About Teaching
Subscribe to E-Alamanc!
Staffbox
Guidelines
 

 

Honors & Other Things

International Honor Society of Nursing: Drs. Barnsteiner and Kagan

Two nursing leaders from HUP are the honored recipients of Founders Awards from Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) Honor Society of Nursing.

Dr. Jane Barnsteiner, professor of pediatric nursing and director of Nursing Translational Research, was awarded the Dorothy Garrigus Adams Award for Excellence in Fostering Professional Standards.

Dr. Sarah Hope Kagan, associate professor of gerontological nursing and a Gerontology Clinical Nurse Specialist, was awarded the Marie Hippensteel Lingeman Award for Excellence in Nursing Practice.

The Founders Awards are presented in the areas of technology, media, chapter excellence, research, and leadership.

Goldstein Award: Dr. Abrahams

Roger Abrahams

Dr. Roger D. Abrahams, the Hum Rosen Professor of Folkore and Folklife, Emeritus, has been awarded the Kenneth S. Goldstein Award of the American Folklore Society for his contributions to strengthening folklore in higher education.

This award memorializes Dr. Kenny Goldstein, who received the first Ph.D. granted by Penn’s folklore program and who also served as chair of the program for 20 years. 

Presently, Dr. Abrahams is co-authoring a book responding to Hurricane Katrina with a focus on those who would “rebuild” New Orleans in their own image.

 

Best and Brightest: Dr. Culhane

Dennis Culhane
Dr. Dennis Culhane, professor in the School of Social Policy and Practice, has been selected by Esquire magazine as one of the “Best & Brightest in 2005”. Available in the December issue, the profile on Dr. Culhane includes findings from his research on urban homelessness. It states, “His recommendations have been adopted by a number of cities and are now a cornerstone of the Bush administration’s plan to reduce homelessness.”

Esquire’s annual list showcases the top leaders in society, business, science, and culture.

 

Highly Cited: Dr. El-Deiry

Wafik El-Deiry

Dr. Wafik S. El-Deiry, professor of medicine, has been recognized by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and Thomson-ISI as a Highly Cited Researcher over the past 20 years in the field of Molecular Biology and Genetics. According to ISI, being acknowledged as a Highly Cited Researcher means that an individual is among the 250 most cited researchers for their published articles within a specific time-period.

Dr. El-Deiry is also the co-program leader of the Radiation Biology Program at Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center. He holds joint appointments in the departments of genetics and pharmacology and an adjunct appointment at the Wistar Institute.

 

GSE Dean for Transition Team

Susan Fuhrman

New Jersey Governor-elect Jon S. Corzine has recruited Penn GSE Dean Susan Fuhrman as co-chair of an education advisory group to advise on transition leadership.

Governor-elect Corzine has convened six such transition teams, charging them to map out strategies for implementing his policy goals and identify critical issues that need to be addressed within the first six months of the administration.

The Public Education Policy Group will make recommendations for expanding full-day kindergarten and preschool programs; increasing the rigor of school curriculums, with an emphasis on math, science, technology, world languages, and financial literacy; increasing the availability of after-school programs; improving special education throughout the state, and other critical issues.

Also on the education team are Arthur F. Ryan, chairman and CEO of Prudential Financial; Joyce Powell, president of the New Jersey Education Association; Dr. Orlando Edreira, Kean University professor of Spanish; and Richard W. Roper, founder and president of The Roper Group.

The other policy groups will address Budget and Reengineering Government; Property Tax Reform; Economic Development; Labor and Workforce Development; and Child Welfare.

Fulbright Scholar: Dr. Leskov

Dr.Aleksandr Leskov, associate research scholar in the department of the history of art, has been awarded a 2005-2006 Fulbright Scholar Grant. He will be researching the topic, The Problem of Scythian Rule: A Study of Kurgan Burials in South Ukraine at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in Kyiv, Urkraine.

Recipients of this award are chosen based on their academic or professional achievement and because they have demonstrated extraordinary leadership potential in their fields.

Awards for Cardiovascular Research: Dr. Kumanyika

Shiriki Kumanyika

Both the American Heart Association and the Association of Black Cardiologists have  presented National Awards to Dr. Shiriki Kumanyika, professor of epidemiology, in the department of biostatistics and epidemiology in the School of Medicine and associate dean for health promotion and disease prevention.

She has won the first-ever American Heart Association Population Research Prize, receiving the prestigious national distinction for her continued efforts in a career devoted to the prevention of heart disease, stroke and related disorders. This award is to recognize and reward an individual who is making outstanding contributions to the advancement of cardiovascular science and who currently heads an outstanding cardiovascular population research laboratory. The prize consists of a citation and an honorarium of $5,000.

Additionally, Kumanyika received the 2005 Dr. Herbert W. Nickens Epidemiology Award from the Association of Black Cardiologists, Inc. (ABC). This award was created to honor outstanding achievement in epidemiologic research in the area of cardiovascular disease.

Two National Justice Positions: Ms. Robinson

Laurie O. Robinson, director of the criminology master of science program at Penn and a former U.S. assistant attorney general, has been elected chair of the board of trustees of the Vera Institute of Justice. She will be only the third chair of the private, non-profit group since its founding in 1961.

Ms. Robinson was also named a member of a new American Judicature Society National Commission on Forensic Science and Public Policy, co-chaired by former attorney general Janet Reno and David Korn, vice president of the Association of American Medical Colleges. The commission will be guiding a new AJS institute aimed at amplifying the impact of science on the justice system. It will adopt national forensic-science standards for use by law enforcement, prosecution, practicing attorneys and the courts and will set the institute research agenda.

Outstanding Junior Investigator: Dr. Thomson

Dr. Evelyn J. Thomson, assistant professor of physics, was awarded an Outstanding Junior Investigator Award from the U.S. Department of Energy. The award recognizes Dr. Thomson’s contributions to high energy and physics and her demonstrated leadership in the field.

The award gives junior faculty direct control over research funds, to accommodate the specific needs of each researcher and to increase their independence and scope in formulating and pursuing their own research goals.

Genetics Research Award: Ms. Yang

Nuo Yang and Haig Kazazian

Nuo Yang, a Ph.D. student in the lab of Dr. Haig H. Kazazian, Jr., chair of the department of genetics, recently received the Predoctoral Basic Research Award from the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG). She received a plaque and $500 at the ASHG annual meeting in Salt Lake City, Utah in October. Ms. Yang’s talk was entitled “Antisense transcript suppresses human LINE-1 retrotransposition via an RNAi mechanism.”

She was recognized for her research on transposable elements, transposons for short. Commonly known as jumping genes, transposons are genes that can move from one chromosome to another or within the same chromosome. Transposons can trigger evolutionary changes in the human genome or, on the other hand, are associated with several types of human diseases, including hemophilia A, beta thalassemia, and retinitis pigmentosa.

Red Ribbon Awards

Three individuals and a newspaper serving Philadelphia’s African-American community have been named winners of the 2005 Red Ribbon Awards for their contributions to the fight against AIDS. The awards are made annually by the Community Advisory Board of Penn’s Center for AIDS Research (CFAR).

This year’s winners:

Jannie L. Blackwell, a member of the Philadelphia City Council, whose advocacy for economic development in her West Philadelphia district has helped address the economic inequalities that fuel the AIDS epidemic;

John B. Jemmott III,   Kenneth B. Clark Professor of Communication and director of the Center for Health Behavior and Communication Research at the Annenberg School, whose research focuses on behavioral strategies to promote the prevention of HIV infection; and

Dr. Rob Roy MacGregor, professor of medicine-infectious diseases and a physician who founded the HUP AIDS Clinical Trials Unit.

In addition, CFAR presented a Red Ribbon Award to The Philadelphia Tribune, which serves the city’s African-American community, for its courageous coverage of the AIDS epidemic.

Gardening and Beautification Winner: Penn Museum

Penn Museum

The Penn Museum is one of 13 winners in the first annual University City Gardening and Beautification Contest for outstanding landscape treatment of a public garden. The contest recognizes commercial and residential properties within the boundaries of University City. University City District in partnership with UC Green recognizes the transforming power of green space, flower and general beautification in urban environments.



 
  Almanac, Vol. 52, No. 15, December 13, 2005

ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS:

Tuesday,
December 13, 2005
Volume 52 Number 15
www.upenn.edu/almanac

 

top of page
Back to Contents page
HOME ISSUE CALENDAR BETWEEN ISSUES ARCHIVE DEADLINES CONTACT USFAQS