Events



Fall 2012

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The Transition from Graduate Student to Professor

Assistant Professor Adam Cobb, Management

Friday, December 14 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Location: Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall 2034

Summary: Assistant Professor Adam Cobb will be leading an informal discussion on the transition into teaching, covering topics such as the role of teaching in on the business school job market, managing the logistics of teaching during your first few years as an assistant professor, and finding a balance between teaching and research.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Management department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Open Online Teaching Colloquium

Monday, December 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 203

Summary: This colloquium brings together faculty who have taught or are teaching open online courses These informal discussions provide participants with opportunities to share and reflect on their experiences, and to learn from the experiences of colleagues and consider new ideas for teaching in this format.

Teaching Laboratory Classes to Chemistry Students

Dr. Jenine Maeyer, General Chemistry Lab Director

Friday, December 7 | 11:30 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: Makineni Conference Room (2nd floor of the Cret wing of the chemistry building)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Coursera Teaching Conversation

Professors Paul Offit, Pediatrics, and Peter Struck, Classical Studies

Thursday, December 6 | 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Faculty Events

Location: McNeil Building, room 169

Summary: For faculty interested in learning more about teaching a Coursera course, this discussion provides an opportunity to talk with colleagues who have taught in this format. Participants will have the chance to ask raise questions and concerns with the facilitating faculty, who will also discuss the opportunities, challenges and surprises they found in crafting and teaching their Coursera courses.

Conversations on Teaching Nursing: Beyond the Lecture -- Effective Activities for the Lecture Classroom

Thursday, December 6 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Nursing 203

Summary: Conversations on Teaching Nursing are opportunities for Nursing faculty to come together for interactive discussions about teaching. Facilitated by Center for Teaching and Learning staff, each session focuses on a different theme and will offer faculty the opportunity to share and reflect upon the ideas and experiences of colleagues. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. Food is provided for those who register in advance.

Teaching Literature in the Foreign Languages

Professors Stefania Benini (Italian), Jacqueline Dougherty (French), and Victoria García-Serrano (Spanish)

Tuesday, December 4 | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Location: Cherpack Lounge (Williams 543)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Hispanic Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Using Wikis in Teaching

Dr. Linda Chance, East Asian Languages & Civilizations

Friday, November 30 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, East Asian Languages & Civilizations

Location: Williams 421

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the East Asian Languages & Civilizations department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Coursera Course Proposal Workshop

Friday, November 30 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Class of 1968 Seminar Room (Room 124 inside the Weigle Information Commons in Van Pelt Library)

Summary: This workshop is intended for faculty who are interested in submitting a proposal to teach a Coursera course. In this workshop we will discuss ideas to consider in proposing – and designing – a course, including your goals for the course, the ways you might achieve those goals in the open online platform, and reasons why the material you want to teach is suited to the open online audience.

Teaching Your First Class

Professor Alison Sweeney, Physics

Thursday, November 29 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Location: David Rittenhouse Laboratory 2C2

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Physics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Time Management: Balancing Research, Teaching, and Job Searches

Professor Bryan Cameron, Spanish, New York University

Thursday, November 29 | 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Location: Cherpack Seminar Room (Williams 543)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Hispanic Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Crafting Written Questions

Professor Peter Holquist, History

Thursday, November 29 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 214

Summary: Generating question prompts for papers and exams is a common aspect of teaching courses. However, it takes time to learn how to word our questions in order to elicit the most thoughtful, focused, and intellectually rigorous responses from students. Peter Holquist will share his expertise and experience in crafting written questions, identifying some of the main elements of a well-worded question and discussing common pitfalls that lead to problems (for graders and students alike). In addition to leading a discussion, he will provide examples of questions—good and bad—that he has used in the past, and explain their evolution over successive versions of the same course.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Digital Humanities in the Classroom

Professor Jim English, English and Mitch Fraas, Bollinger Fellow in Library Innovation, Van Pelt Library

Thursday, November 29 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall, room 330 (English Graduate Student Lounge)

Summary: This workshop will offer a hands-on primer in incorporating “digital humanities” into your classroom. We will discuss the array of technology available for teaching in the humanities, and participants will learn practical tips and strategies for making their classrooms more “high tech.”
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Executive MBAs

Professor Peter Cappelli, Management

Thursday, November 29 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Location: Management Department, 2000 Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall, Room 2034

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Management department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum: Active Learning in Lecture Classes

Professors Rahul Mangharam, Electrical and Systems Engineering, and Lyle Ungar, Computer and Information Science

Wednesday, November 28 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Connecting with a Moving Target: The Computer Science Student Over the Years

Professor Max Mintz, Computer and Information Science

Tuesday, November 27 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Location: Levine 307

Summary: It’s not a common occurrence that your students like you enough to
create a documentary about you:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQ2sRCw6v4g

Professor Max Mintz will lead an intimate, entertaining discussion
about how the computer science student has evolved over the 38 years
since he joined the CIS department. Max maintains a strong rapport
with his students, and he’ll discuss how he connects with his students
while holding them to a strict set of academic standards. Workshop
participants will take away how they can connect with their own
students in meaningful ways.

Democracy in the Classroom

Professor Sigal Ben Porath, Education

Tuesday, November 27 | 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education and Sociology

Location: Graduate School of Education, room 114

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Graduate School of Education and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Conversations on Teaching Nursing: Connecting with Your Students -- How to Convince Students that You Are Interested in their Learning in a Large Class

Thursday, November 15 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Fagin 203

Summary: How can faculty establish personal connections with students in large lecture classes? In this session, the group will reflect upon and define strategies for effective communication between instructors/TAs and students via multiple platforms –in-person, email, and comments on student work. Please RSVP by November 12!

Conversations on Teaching Nursing are opportunities for Nursing faculty to come together for interactive discussions about teaching. Facilitated by Center for Teaching and Learning staff, each session focuses on a different theme and will offer faculty the opportunity to share and reflect upon the ideas and experiences of colleagues. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. Food is provided for those who register in advance.

Teaching outside your area of expertise

Professor Matthew Bidwell, Management

Wednesday, November 14 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Location: Management Department, 2000 Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall, Room 2034

Summary: Faculty members, especially new business-school faculty, are often asked to teach courses outside of or tangential to their area of expertise. We will discuss how to handle these requests and strategies related to preparing for and teaching such courses in an informal, discussion-oriented atmosphere.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Management department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Teaching - A Trouble Shooting Roundtable

Professors Karen Detlefsen and Susan Sauvé Meyer, Philosophy

Tuesday, November 13 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: This workshop provides an opportunity to bring challenges you face teaching to a roundtable. Have you been in a difficult or uncomfortable situation and want to know if other people have had similar experiences? Are you trying to help a student on some issue and want to know what works? Have you had trouble getting a teaching related task done and want to get some input? There will be a google document set up to collect and think about challenges beforehand. For this purpose, if you want to participate, please email Wiebke Deimling at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Problem Students and Other Serious Issues In and Out of the Classroom

Professors Victoria Garcia-Serrano, Toni Esposito, and Kate McMahon, Hispanic Studies

Tuesday, November 13 | 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Location: Cherpack Lounge (543 Williams Hall)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Hispanic Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching as a New Faculty Member

Dr. Brooke Duffy & Dr. Adrienne Shaw, School of Media and Communication, Temple University

Tuesday, November 13 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg School, room 224

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching with Film

Professors Peter Decherney & Tim Corrigan, English

Monday, November 12 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall, room 330 (English Graduate Student Lounge)

Summary: In this workshop, we’ll talk about practical tips and tools for teaching with film. We will pay particular attention to how to get students to “read” film, focusing on the vocabulary and information students need to have in order to perform meaningful analysis of film. How do we get students to understand that watching a film requires the same level of analysis as parsing a poem? And then how do we get students to do that analysis? We’ll also discuss “best practices” for using film in class, as well as the resources available for teaching with film.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Coursera Course Proposal Workshop

Friday, November 9 | 11:00 am - 12:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Class of 1968 Seminar Room (Room 124 inside the Weigle Information Commons in Van Pelt Library)

Summary: This workshop is intended for faculty who are interested in submitting a proposal to teach a Coursera course. In this workshop we will discuss ideas to consider in proposing – and designing – a course, including your goals for the course, the ways you might achieve those goals in the open online platform, and reasons why the material you want to teach is suited to the open online audience.

Integrating Quantitative Analysis into the Design Studio: Issues and Potentialities

Professors Ali Malkawi, Brian Phillips and Franca Trubiano, Architecture

Wednesday, November 7 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Architecture

Location: TBA

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Design and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch: Teaching Texts in Translation

Professors Joe Lowry, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and Bethany Wiggin, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Wednesday, November 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Bringing Things to Class

Professor Robert Blair St. George, History

Monday, November 5 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 214

Summary: Many historians love to think with, analyze, and historicize the objects around us. But how might we incorporate them into the classroom? What does it mean to teach with and through “things”? Robert St. George—folklorist, historian, and collector of all sorts of things—will lead us in a discussion on integrating artifacts into undergraduate course design. We will discuss the possibilities offered by this pedagogical approach, both for the classroom and for assignments, as well as how to address difficulties if and when they arise.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Creating Original Content

Professor Randall Kamien, Physics

Thursday, November 1 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Location: David Rittenhouse Laboratory 2N17 (Physics Faculty Lounge)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Physics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum: Various Modes of Communication in Teaching – Reaching Various Students

Professor Andre DeHon, Electrical and Systems Engineering, and Computer and Information Science, and Dr. Jonathan Fiene, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Thursday, November 1 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Offering Choices in Assignments and Assessments

Professor Marybeth Gasman, Education

Wednesday, October 31 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education and Sociology

Location: Graduate School of Education, room 427

Summary: We regret canceling this workshop. Professor Gasman is unable to get back to Philadelphia owing to Hurricane Sandy’s disruption of air travel.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Graduate School of Education and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Best Strategies for TA-Professor Collaboration

Professor Barbara Riegel, Nursing

Wednesday, October 31 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Maxim Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin 203

Summary: At this workshop, strategies for creating effective TA-professor relationships to facilitate teaching will be discussed. Diverse points of view of a standing faculty member, a new professor and experienced TAs will be presented by panelists. Workshop participants will have a chance to reflect on their relationships with their professors and think about maximizing the learning of a teacher’s role during a TA assignment.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Working With Students One-on-One

Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Thursday, October 25 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: Meeting one-on-one with students is not only incredibly important but also incredibly rewarding: these discussions can reinforce, supplement, and deepen students’ understanding of course material; meeting one-on-one can also offer insight into who your students are and how they are doing in and out of the classroom. That said, meeting one-on-one with students can also be intimidating and frustrating At times you may have to deal with demanding students, negotiate boundaries and struggle with students who don’t show up for their assigned meetings. At times you may also have no one in your office when you know students need to be there. In this workshop, we’ll discuss a variety of practical strategies to get the most out of one-on-one work, stressing, in particular, how you can use these meetings to teach and connect with students differently than you do in a classroom setting.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Evolving a Course from Scratch

Professor Ben Taskar, Computer and Information Science

Thursday, October 25 | 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Location: Levine 307

Summary: CIS 520, Machine Learning, is the largest graduate-level course offered by the CIS department and one of the largest courses offered by SEAS as a whole. Associate professor Ben Taskar took over this course when he joined the department five years ago and re-hauled it from scratch. In this workshop, Ben will talk about how he got started developing the course as well as how he evolved the course over a five year span. Concretely, Ben will discuss how courses instructors can get started in developing a new course as well as how to effective respond to feedback to polish and refine their courses over long periods of time.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Computer and Information Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Effective Lecturing

Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Wednesday, October 24 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: As teachers, we all want our lectures to be entertaining, educational, and inspiring. However, as veteran students, we have seen lectures that have either succeeded or utterly failed in these regards. In this workshop, we will discuss the purpose of the lecture in the classroom, and how we can craft high-quality lectures for our students. Participants will take away a set of strategies for preparing, delivering, and following-up their lectures in order to maximize their students’ engagement and satisfaction.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch: Providing Feedback on Students’ Written Work

Professors Anne Norton, Political Science, and Michael Zuckerman, History

Wednesday, October 24 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Working With International Students

Maxim Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Thursday, October 18 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, 2nd Floor Conference Room

Summary: International students comprise a significant and growing segment of the student body at Penn and elsewhere in the U.S. These students grew up and received their previous education in different societies and cultures. What are some of their adjustment and adaptation challenges? What do they need to know about American academic culture and your expectations? What do you need to know about their culture and educational expectations? How can you incorporate their culture in your classroom? And how can you best evaluate their progress and help them succeed? The goal of this workshop is to initiate a discussion of these questions and provide insights into the world of international students, generating suggestions for your everyday teaching practice.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Getting Students Engaged in “Distant” Texts

Professor Emily Steiner, English

Wednesday, October 17 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall, Room 330

Summary: In this workshop, we’ll discuss how to get students engaged in texts that may seem, because of their style, subject matter, or date of composition, alien and even threatening to students. How much context should you provide students when you teach works that “feel foreign”? How do you get students excited about and invested in material that can seem intimidating? And how, ultimately, do you strike the balance between making the material relevant and relatable while still preserving the fundamental strangeness of a “distant” text?
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Gauging Student Understanding: How to Know What They Know

Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Wednesday, October 17 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: As instructors, how do we know whether or not our students are really “getting it”? Test scores and term papers may seem like the obvious answers, but the ability to gauge student comprehension early on and to do so on an ongoing basis can actually make test scores and term papers better and make for a much more productive classroom experience. This workshop explores a range of strategies for determining what students understand, what they don’t understand, and how to adjust your teaching accordingly. By learning to “read” students and implement strategies that will encourage them to both demonstrate and communicate their level of understanding, workshop participants will come away with a set of skills that can be used to make them more effective instructors, all the while helping to enhance the performance of their students.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

The Use and Abuse of PowerPoint

Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Tuesday, October 16 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: Slides can be a great support for lectures and class discussion. Images can help us make examples more vivid, diagrams can help us organize complex material, and after class we can easily share all of this with our students and have it readily available for the next class. But all of us have sat through cringe-making, yawn-inducing, and confusion-creating PowerPoint presentations as well. This workshop will discuss the different functions that slides can fulfill (illustration, props for lecture and discussion, summary and organization of content, review material for students), focusing on ways to use PowerPoint effectively to help students learn. It will also point to different software options (PowerPoint, its alternatives and software supplementing PowerPoint). Please bring your laptop for a hands-on experience.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Mentoring Undergraduates in the Research Lab

Professor Ivan Dmochowski, Chemistry

Tuesday, October 16 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: IAST 4000 (fourth floor of the Vagelos wing, Chemistry Building)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Working With Students One-on-One

Professor Carolyn Marvin, Communication

Friday, October 12 | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg School, room 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Constructing a Theory Course and Structuring a Syllabus

Professor Daniel Barber, Architecture

Wednesday, October 10 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Architecture

Location: Architectural Archives (beneath the Fisher Fine Arts Library)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Design and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Improvising in the Classroom: What To Do When Things Go Wrong

JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Wednesday, October 10 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: All manner of things can go wrong in the classroom: students won’t respond to your questions, the discussion veers off on a tangent, you find yourself running out of time to cover critical material, nobody seems to have done the reading, the technology won’t work…In this workshop we will cover a variety of strategies to help deal with these and similar issues, ranging from anticipating and planning for contingencies and pitfalls, incorporating the unexpected into your lesson plan, and different ways to adapt on the fly.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Soliciting and Making Use of Student Feedback

Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Design

Tuesday, October 9 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: Though students typically evaluate their courses at the end of the semester through a standardized university-wide system, soliciting student feedback mid-semester via one’s own questionnaire can be a valuable resource for improving one’s teaching. Doing so gives one the opportunity to tailor the questions asked to one’s own particular situation and, by offering evaluations before the semester’s end, one also has a chance to implement changes immediately. In this workshop, we’ll explore strategies for designing and employing mid-semester evaluations; discuss how to develop evaluation questions for your specific needs and situation; and how one might best interpret student feedback and use it to enhance one’s teaching.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Using a Case Study to Teach Corporate Strategy

Professor Lori Rosenkopf, Management

Monday, October 8 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Location: Management Department, 2000 Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall, Room 2034

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Management department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Grading: What is an A? Or, To B or not to B

Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Monday, October 8 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Williams Hall 205

Summary: For many instructors, “To B or Not to B” is not just an existential question. Grading can be one of the most stressful and least rewarding aspects of teaching. Establishing clear standards and consistently applying those standards, however, can turn a source of frustration and confrontation into an opportunity to enrich the learning experience. This workshop will help instructors develop guidelines for grading standards, communicate those standards effectively to students, and build confidence in discussing grades with students. Attendees will collaborate to articulate standards that help establish a classroom atmosphere of fairness and transparency that will help structure student improvement.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Teaching and the Job Interview

Professor Nancy Steinhardt, East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Friday, October 5 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, EALC

Location: Williams 421

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the East Asian Languages and Civilizations department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Different Techniques in Leading Discussion

Professors Kaja Silverman and André Dombrowski, History of Art

Friday, October 5 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Location: Jaffe 113

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History of Art department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Outside Your Area of Expertise

Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Thursday, October 4 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: As teaching assistants, we are often asked to teach topics outside of our area of specialization. It can seem counterintuitive to be asked to teach relatively foreign material; however, in this workshop, we will explore how to use this experience to become a better teacher. We will discuss how to harness your own background as an expert learner in the field to provide students with useful questions, guidance, and, maybe even, a sense of discovery. We will also touch on ways to address your own lack of expertise and the advantages to you (and your research) of teaching something new.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Visual Pedagogies: Presentation Software and Visuality in the Classroom

Professor Michael Solomon, Hispanic Studies

Thursday, October 4 | 11:30 am - 12:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Location: Cherpack Lounge, Williams Hall 543

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Hispanic Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching to All Levels of Students

Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, East Asian Languages & Civilizations

Wednesday, October 3 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: In theory, university courses are designed and numbered for certain stages of the learning process. In practice, even in introductory lectures and advanced seminars, students come to class at different points in their educational careers and life experiences. In your course section you may find a freshmen undecided on his or her major, a junior from another school fulfilling an elective, and a senior preparing for a career in the field – even a fellow graduate student sitting in. How do we as instructors make the material we are teaching accessible and
relevant to each of our students? In this workshop we will discuss strategies to build on the strengths of a diverse class while addressing the challenges that may arise.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch: Using the Library in Your Teaching

Professors Lisa Mitchell, South Asia Studies, and Margo Todd, History

Wednesday, October 3 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

One Topic, Three Syllabi

Professor Josephine Park, English

Wednesday, October 3 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: English Graduate Student Lounge, Fisher Bennett 330

Summary: In this workshop, we’ll be talking about making syllabi. To that end, we’ll discuss not only what makes for an effective syllabus but also how to generate multiple syllabi from one area of focus. How, for example, does a syllabus for an introductory lecture differ from that of an upper-level seminar? We will consider how a syllabus can alter both the form and content of the course, how (and how much) to incorporate primary and secondary reading, and the types of assignments appropriate to different course levels. Finally, by looking at the syllabi of several different courses, each united by a central topic, we will generate practical tips and strategies for formulating your own syllabi.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Proposing and Preparing an LPS Summer Course in the Humanities and Qualitative Social Sciences

Eli Lesser, Director of Summer Sessions and Emily Steiner, Undergraduate Chair Department of English

Monday, October 1 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: This workshop will focus on helping humanities and qualitative social science graduate students successfully propose and prepare to teach a summer course. It will begin by considering the practical elements of the process and discussing what departments and LPS look for when deciding what courses to accept. Then this workshop will offer a nuts and bolts look at key questions that graduate students preparing to teach on a condensed summer schedule should think about as they create a course description and a syllabus: How can I maintain intellectual rigor while condensing the material? How do I attract students to my course? What kind of reading and writing projects should I assign? What will students be expecting? Finally, the workshop will consider how to take advantage of the process of proposing and designing a summer course to prepare for the job market and to develop as a teacher.

Identifying and Helping Struggling Students

Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Monday, October 1 | 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: Many students, even the best ones, struggle with a range of problems: reading overload, test-taking anxiety, homesickness, overbooked social calendars. Often these challenges leave students struggling academically. In these situations, it can be difficult for TAs and instructors to detect that a problem exists, and to know when, how, and to what extent to intervene. How can we identify a struggling student? What problems are our responsibility to address? What are we equipped to handle on our own, and to whom can we refer students for additional help? Participants in the workshop will develop some specific strategies for addressing these questions in their own teaching while also considering when and how to encourage students to take advantage of the resources available to struggling students at Penn.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Building a Teaching Portfolio

Professor Adrienne Martin, Philosophy

Monday, October 1 | 10:30 am - 11:45 am

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen Hall, room 493

Summary: This workshop will discuss putting together a teaching profile to apply for academic jobs. We will talk about the different teaching related elements of a portfolio: a teaching statement, statistics over course evaluations and teaching experience. We will go over strategies for gaining the right kind of teaching experience, for communicating ones teaching interests and strength, and for answering teaching related questions in a job interview.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Through Student Presentations

Professor Ayako Kano, East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Friday, September 28 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Location: Williams 421

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the East Asian Languages and Civilizations department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Managing Your Time While Teaching

Myrna Cohen, Executive Director, Weingarten Learning Resource Center

Friday, September 28 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: How can you balance your own academic goals with your teaching responsibilities? What are the methods for accomplishing short- and long-range tasks while teaching a class or a recitation, holding office hours, and/or grading exams? In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to explore their own time management styles and take away additional strategies for taking control of their time.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Defining Your Role as a TA in Art History

Professor Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, History of Art

Thursday, September 27 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Location: Jaffe 113

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History of Art department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Conversations on Teaching Nursing: The Art of the Lecture

Thursday, September 27 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Fagin 213

Summary: Conversations on Teaching Nursing are opportunities for Nursing faculty to come together for interactive discussions about teaching. Facilitated by Center for Teaching and Learning staff, each session focuses on a different theme and will offer faculty the opportunity to share and reflect upon the ideas and experiences of colleagues. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate.

What To Do With Your Silent Classroom

Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Wednesday, September 26 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: We all hope that our classrooms will be active, lively places with talkative students answering our questions eagerly. Unfortunately this is not always the case. The silent classroom is a challenge that many TAs face, whether they are trying to lead a discussion, stimulate conversation among students, review for an exam, or help students through a problem sets. This workshop will focus on strategies to foster student participation but will also think about the advantages of silence in the classroom. We will explore some of the reasons why a classroom might become silent, how this silence can be channeled into productive learning, and how you can create an atmosphere where students feel comfortable talking at times and listening and thinking at other times.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Getting Students to Think (Not Just the Right Answer)

Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Tuesday, September 25 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, room 305

Summary: By following the correct series of steps, any student can arrive at the answer to a given problem. However, performing these steps for one problem does not always guarantee that the student will be able to answer even a very similar problem on another homework set or an exam. By drawing on common themes between questions and focusing on general problem solving techniques, TAs can emphasize thought processes that will allow students to solve problems in many contexts and derive long-lasting value from the course. This workshop will focus on how to structure recitations to bring out these themes and make class more rewarding for students.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Education to scale: coping with large classes

Professor Steve Zdancewic, Computer and Information Science

Tuesday, September 25 | 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Levine 307

Summary: Enrollments in both CIS undergraduate and graduate classes have dramatically increased over the last few years. Even though our enrollments are up, we are still under the obligation to provide a quality education to each student. As instructors, how do our techniques change to meet the needs of a large class, and as TAs, how does our role change in order to add a personal touch to the sea of students we must help? Associate Professor Steve Zdancewic shares his experiences working with both large and small classes here at Penn as well as offer advice to current and future instructors and TAs on how to scale their teaching to meet the size of their classes.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Computer and Information Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Creating Your Teaching Persona

Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education and Sociology

Monday, September 24 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center, 2nd Floor Conference Room

Summary: Who are you in front of a classroom? Who would you like to be? The type of teacher you are often relates to the type of student you were—but not all your students are like you. How can you best present yourself to your students so that they can participate in your course? In this interactive workshop, we will consider the many types of excellent teachers (and TAs) out there, and begin to think about aspects of our own teaching personae. We will discuss elements of performance and interaction, and reflect on our own experiences as teachers and learners.

Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Building Students' Writing Skills

Dr. Valerie Ross, Director, Critical Writing Program, Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing

Friday, September 21 | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg School, room 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Sharing Your Enthusiasm for Science With Your Students

Professors Larry Sneddon and Eric Schelter, Chemistry

Thursday, September 20 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: IAST 3000 (3rd floor of the Vagelos wing of the chemistry building)

Summary: With the hectic pace of college classes, undergraduate students often become focused on what they need to do to get a good grade, rather than becoming excited about the material being taught to them. How can our teaching encourage student learning to develop beyond the common refrain of “Will a question like this be on the exam?” “What formulas do I need to know?” or “Should I just memorize this?” to an appreciation for the specific concepts taught in the classroom? In this workshop we will explore ways to channel our own enthusiasm for science into the classroom in order to translate this attitude to our students.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Through Contestable Questions

Professor Stanton E.F. Wortham, Education

Thursday, September 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education and Sociology

Location: Graduate School of Education, room 400

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Graduate School of Education and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The do's and don'ts of successful lesson planning

Professor Gene Mele, Physics

Wednesday, September 19 | 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Location: David Rittenhouse Laboratory 3W2

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Physics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching with Primary Sources

Professor Kathy Peiss, History

Thursday, September 13 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall, room 209

Summary: How can you deepen your students’ readings of source texts? How do you teach them to analyze music, advertisements, films, and other non-textual material? What would it be like to develop an entire course around primary source material? Kathy Peiss is renowned for her undergraduate teaching, especially her creative use of primary sources. Prof. Peiss will share her expertise and discuss ways to enrich the classroom with creative and engaging ways of approaching primary sources.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

It Begins With a Question: Strategies for Provoking Discussion

Professor David Leatherbarrow, Architecture

Wednesday, September 12 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Architecture

Location: Meyerson Hall, upper gallery

Summary: Leading a recitation session involves an act of mediation between a series of texts, students’ interpretations of them, and one’s own understanding of the material. Each participant brings with them their own body of knowledge and set of experiences which orient their understandings. In the best of cases, a productive dialogue ensues, enriching the group’s understanding of the topic at hand.
As a recitation instructor, one’s commentary will doubtlessly be helpful in clarifying meanings and giving context to positions, but it should be remembered that one’s objective is to lead students in discussion, rather than dominate the conversation. At times, a useful device for accomplishing this might be a well- placed and carefully considered question, leading students to uncover answers for themselves rather than always offering one’s own. This session seeks to develop a dialog around this very notion, offering various strategies for provoking discussion with a question.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Architecture department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Inter-Professional and Global Collaborations

Dean Afaf I. Meleis, School of Nursing

Wednesday, September 12 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Maxim Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin 213

Summary: Traditionally, healthcare professionals were educated in physically and conceptually separated settings. There is an increasing understanding that in order to improve the quality of the provided healthcare services, more interdisciplinary collaboration and effective team work is needed. Discussion on teaching challenges and strategies in the changing educational environments is critical in order to facilitate and advance this transition.
The workshop will present the new inter-professional approach to healthcare professionals’ education developed by the Lancet/IOM initiative. In particular, the workshop will address the structure of future healthcare professionals’ education, global aspects related to teaching and learning, curriculum transformation and innovations that are needed to achieve better partnerships between educators, community and healthcare systems. Suggestions for current teaching assistants and professors will be also provided.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

New Lecturer's Orientation

Catherine Turner, Senior Associate Director CTL

Tuesday, September 4 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Williams 25

Summary: This session will discuss Penn policies and resources that new lecturers to Penn may not yet be familiar with. The session will cover a variety of policies, including academic integrity and religious holidays, as well as resources, such as Courses-in-Touch, Course Problem Notices, and the Weingarten Learning Resources Center. However, this session will also leave ample time for participants questions and will focus on the issues of most concern to the new lecturers there.

Being a TA in Philosophy

Professor Michael Weisberg, Philosophy

Friday, August 31 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen Hall 493

Summary: We will discuss your role as a TA in philosophy and the responsibilities and possibilities that come with it. Participants will discuss the different kinds of duties TAs have, from running sections to grading and office hours, and concrete strategies for dealing with them. They will also talk about what to expect from Penn students as well as teaching styles and balancing TAing with course work and dissertation writing. Finally participants will consider TAing as professional development.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

TA Training

Friday, August 31 | 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

TA Training

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

9:00-11:30

Roundtable Discussions on Challenges Facing TAs: Student Learning and Your Roles and Responsibilities (Williams Hall, rooms TBA)

11:15-11:30

Coffee Break (Lobby outside Cohen 17)

11:30-12:30

TAing as Professional Development (Cohen 17)

Afternoon

Departmental Workshops
Contact your home department for information

2:00-4:00

Beginners Workshop on Blackboard (Van Pelt Library, Goldstein Classroom)
Optional session. Click here to register.

TA Training

Thursday, August 30 | 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

TA Training

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

9-12 & 1:00-4:00

Teaching Demonstrations and Critiques (Williams Hall, rooms TBA)

TA Training

Wednesday, August 29 | 9:00 am - 4:45 pm

TA Training

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

9:00-9:45

Welcoming Plenary (Cohen 17)
Bruce Lenthall, Director, Center for Teaching & Learning
Dennis DeTurck, Dean of the College
Ralph Rosen, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies

9:45-10:15

Your Role as a TA (Cohen 17)
Julie McGurk, Associate Director, Center for Teaching & Learning
Catherine Turner, Senior Associate Director, Center for Teaching & Learning

10:15-10:45

Preparing for Your First Day (Cohen 17)
Ian Petrie, Senior Associate Director, Center for Teaching & Learning

10:45-11:00

Coffee Break (Lobby outside Cohen 17)

11:00-11:45

Support Resources for Your Students (Cohen 17)
Janet Tighe, Director of Academic Advising and Dean of Freshmen
Myrna Cohen, Executive Director, Weingarten Learning Resources Center
Nathaniel Amos, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
Donna Brown, Director, Tutoring Center

11:45-12:30

Penn Policies and Resources (Cohen 17)

  • Sexual Harassment – Felicity Paxton, Director, Penn Women’s Center
  • Student Privacy – Maura Johnston, University Privacy Officer
  • Students with Disabilities – Susan Shapiro, Director, Student Disabilities Services
  • Academic Integrity – TBA, Director, Office of Student Conduct

2:00-4:45

Graduate Student-Led Workshops (Williams Hall, rooms TBA)

  • Leading Discussions in the Humanities
  • Grading in the Humanities and Qualitative Social Sciences
  • Grading in the Sciences and Quantitative Social Sciences
  • Recitations in the Sciences and Quantitative Social Sciences
  • Leading Effective Lab Sessions
  • Leading Discussions in the Quantitative Sciences and Social Sciences