Events



Fall 2013

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Creating Syllabi from your Research

Professor Bethany Wiggin, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Monday, December 9 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bridget Swanson, CTL Fellow, Gemanic Languages and Literatures

Location: Max Kade German Culture and Media Center, 3401 Walnut St, Room 329 A

Summary:

Teaching Using Interactive Demonstration

Professor Stephanie Weirich, Computer and Information Science

Monday, December 9 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Levine 307

Summary: When teaching a skill new to students, such as programming, it can often be helpful to demonstrate the skill live to your audience. We often do this in computer science courses through “live coding”. Yet, what are the reasons behind this choice? To increase engagement? To familiarize students with the code? To familiarize students with the process of programming? Prof. Stephanie Weirich will lead a discussion on the use of interactive demonstration in the classroom. Please bring your own experiences — both as a student and as a teacher — to join in the conversation.

Lunch will be served.

This event is open to the wider university community, though the topic will be of more interest to folks in SEAS. Students and faculty are both encouraged to attend.

Please RSVP for this event using this form: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DQFBBPD
(but walk-ins always welcome!)

Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

Philosophy, Relevance, and the "Real World"

Professor Alexander Guerrero, Philosophy

Friday, December 6 | 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 493

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Preparing problems for exams, homework, and classroom examples

Dr. Michael Carchidi, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics

Friday, December 6 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rebecca Pierce, CTL Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics

Location: Skirkanich 508

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

Choose Your Own Adventure: Creating an Introductory Syllabus with a Narrative

Professor Tim Powell, Religious Studies

Thursday, December 5 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rose Muravchick, CTL Graduate Fellow, Religious Studies

Location: Cohen 203

Summary: Creating a syllabus for an introductory course where there is either no textbook available, or no textbook that meets the needs of the course or institution provides an instructor with a unique set of challenges. How can we assemble an effective introductory course that models the kind of scholarship we desire to create within our own work? How can you find your voice as an emerging scholar and share it compellingly with your students? Within this framework Dr. Powell will address other common issues that arise in creating introductory courses, including: choosing and presenting primary texts in translation, refining the narrative of your course to meet the needs of different types of academic institutions, and managing student expectations within the introductory course. While this workshop will focus on examples from within Religious Studies, all of these issues are of potential interest to graduate students in other departments who are welcome to attend.
Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

*RESCHEDULED* Teaching Texts in Translation

Professor Emily Wilson, Classical Studies

Thursday, December 5 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Location: Classics Lounge, 2nd Floor Claudia Cohen Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classical Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Say Yes to the Text: The Mechanics of Teaching Close-Reading

Professor David Kazanjian, English

Tuesday, November 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bronwyn Wallace, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall 330

Summary: As the signal method of our discipline, ‘close-reading’ might entail not only a method or a skill, but an ethics – a means of relating to texts and to each other. This workshop asks, what are we teaching when we teach ‘close-reading’? By what methods do we encourage students to create productive relationships with the texts they read? How do we organize our classrooms as environments amenable to close-reading, and how do we structure our teaching – from in-class work to assignment-design – to develop and reinforce the skills associated with it?
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

Projects Based in the Real World

Professor Zack Ives, Computer and Information Science

Thursday, November 21 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Levine 512

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Computer & Information Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

*LOCATION CHANGE* The Interdisciplinary Classroom

Professor Tsitsi Jaji, English

Tuesday, November 19 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Sarah Nicolazzo, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Location: English Department Grad Lounge (330 Fisher-Bennett)

Summary: What are the pedagogical challenges and rewards of teaching across languages, fields, media, or time periods? What specific pedagogical skills help us teach radically different objects or methods of analysis in the same course? How do we balance our interdisciplinary interests with the curricular demands that a course train students in a particular field, time period, or national tradition? What specific skills do students learn when we ask them to think across disciplines? Join us for a conversation with Tsitsi Jaji as we address these questions and generate ideas for bridging disciplines in our own classrooms.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Comparative Literature department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Why Teaching the Humanities Matters

Professors Kevin Platt, Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Brian Rose, Classical Studies

Monday, November 18 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 392

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Effective Lecturing

Professor Katherine Kuchenbecker, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics

Friday, November 15 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Faculty Events

Convener: Rebecca Pierce, CTL Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics

Location: Skirkanich Hall Room 114- Greenberg Lounge

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

From Discussion to Argument: Analytical Rhetoric in the Classroom

Professor Emily Steinlight, English

Monday, November 11 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bronwyn Wallace, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: English Department Graduate Lounge (Fisher-Bennett Hall 330)

Summary: This workshop will focus on two central features of literary pedagogy: fostering productive class discussion, and teaching the skills associated with developing argumentative rhetoric in literary analysis. How do we engage our students in the collective endeavor of reading a literary text in class? And how can we mobilize that collective work to help students to become comfortable in and skilled at the basics of argument in our discipline?

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

How to Guide Students in Writing Research Papers

Professor Heather Sharkey, Near Eastern Languages and Civlizations

Monday, November 11 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Location: Williams Hall 844 (NELC conference room)

Summary:

This is your brain on lab: how to use laboratory learning to enrich undergraduate curricula

Dr. Mike Kaplan, Biological Basis of Behavior, Dr. Linda Robinson, Biology, and Dr. Karen Hogan, Biology

Thursday, November 7 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tanya Weerakkody, CTL Fellow, Neuroscience

Location: 215 Stemmler Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Neuroscience department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

*LOCATION CHANGE* Gender in the Philosophy Classroom

Professor Adrienne Martin, Philosophy

Thursday, November 7 | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Fellow, Philosophy

Location: 2nd Floor Conference Room, Graduate Student Center

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Disability and Pedagogy: Creating an Accessible Classroom

Professor Heather Love, English, and Jami N. Fisher, ASL Program Coordinator, Department of Linguistics

Monday, November 4 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Sarah Nicolazzo, CTL Fellow, Comparative Literature

Location: Cherpack Lounge, 543 Williams Hall

Summary: How might we root our pedagogy in the activist and theoretical positions outlined by the field of disability studies? Disability studies understands disability as a mode of human variety and difference, which only becomes an impairment when an inaccessible environment makes it so. Access, therefore, requires the structural transformation of institutions—such as, for example, the university. What does it mean, then, to teach accessibly? How do teachers transform these analytical insights into practical strategies for the classroom? How does thinking critically about access and disability help us better teach all of our students? Join us for a conversation with Heather Love and Jami N. Fisher as we address these questions and more.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Comparative Literature department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Introduction to Penn’s STEM Teaching Initiative and the Highly Active Classroom

Professor Dennis DeTurck, Math and Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, Dr. LeAnn Dourte, Bioengineering, Professor Beth Winkelstein, Bioengineering and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education

Thursday, October 31 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

How to Work with Challenging Students

Tanya Weerakkody, CTL Graduate Fellow, Neuroscience

Monday, October 28 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In this workshop, we will consider multiple interpretations of the “challenging student” and explore potential reasons for their behaviors. Additionally, we will discuss how these behaviors can inform our strategy to improve student achievement both inside and outside classroom. Effective techniques for preventing and eliminating power struggles, motivating students, and fostering positive relationships will be among the topics addressed.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Talking as Learning: Creating and Managing Effective Class Discussions

Professor Lauren Ristvet, Anthropology

Monday, October 28 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Location: Williams Hall 844 (NELC Conference Room)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Making Group Work Work

Bridget Swanson, CTL Graduate Fellow, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Friday, October 25 | 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: The adage “two heads are better than one” speaks to the potential groups have to be more motivated, creative, and productive than an individual on his/her own. Indeed, in the realm of the classroom, group work can directly contribute to increased student learning and retention of material as well as overall college success. Nevertheless, the effective development and facilitation of group work activities requires thoughtful preparation and execution on the part of the TA/Instructor. In this workshop, we will discuss how to design, supervise, debrief, and assess group work in a manner that engages students and promotes learning. Specifically, we will address:

· the challenges group work can pose and ways to prevent these potential pitfalls

· how to form effective groups and foster collaboration

· how to structure activities to lead to intended learning outcome(s)

· how to debrief group work and allow for student input through self-evaluation

We will also have to time cover any specific questions or concerns that participants have.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Integrating Lecture, Research, and Fieldwork in the Undergraduate Classroom

Professor Justin McDaniel, Religious Studies

Thursday, October 24 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rose Muravchick, CTL Graduate Fellow, Reliigious Studies

Location: 203 Cohen Hall

Summary: Instead of seeing research assignments and lectures as two separate components of course, students often thrive when they can bring difficult questions discussed in class into their field and library research. This doesn’t simply mean that research should reinforce or supplement lessons introduced in lectures, but that field assignments should provide an opportunity to question the information presented in lectures. This overview will provide examples of assignments, field excursions, and service-learning can be used for more effective classroom experiences. Students from all graduate programs are welcome to attend. Refreshments will be provided.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Religious Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Effective Lecturing

Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Thursday, October 24 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: As teachers, we all want our lectures to be compelling, educational, and inspiring. However, as veteran students, we have seen lectures that have either succeeded or utterly failed in these regards. In this workshop, we will discuss the purpose of the lecture in the classroom, and how we can craft high-quality lectures for our students. Participants will take away a set of strategies — focusing on how to structure time and how to mix presentation modes — for preparing and delivering their lectures in order to maximize their students’ learning

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Teaching with Canvas

Dr. Jane Dmochowski, Earth and Environmental Science, and Professor Dan Singer, Philosophy

Tuesday, October 22 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Balancing Teaching and Research

Professor Sheila Murnaghan, Classical Studies

Thursday, October 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Location: Classics Lounge, 2nd Floor Claudia Cohen Hall

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classical Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Reaching Students at Different Levels

Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Tuesday, October 15 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In theory, university courses are designed and numbered for certain stages of the learning process. In practice, whether in introductory lectures or advanced seminars, students come to class at different points in their educational careers and life experiences. In your course section you may find a freshmen undecided on his or her major, a junior from another school fulfilling an elective, and a senior preparing for a career in the field – even a fellow graduate student sitting in. How do we as instructors make the material we are teaching accessible and relevant to each of our students? In this workshop we will discuss strategies to build on the strengths of a diverse class while addressing the challenges that may arise.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Journal club in the classroom: How to incorporate primary literature into your undergraduate course

Professors Isabel Muzzio & Joe Kable, Psychology

Tuesday, October 15 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tanya Weerakkody, CTL Graduate Fellow, Neuroscience

Location: 215 Stemmler Hall

Summary: In the past decade, recommendations for reforming the way we teach science to undergraduates have surged. In fact, funding agencies, such as the NSF and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, are offering assistance to educators that incorporate research-like experiences into undergraduate curricula. This workshop will tackle how to effectively integrate scholarly articles into large introductory level classes and small upper level seminars, alike. Professors Isabel Muzzio and Joe Kable will lead the discussion on how to help students become proficient in reading and evaluating research literature. In addition, they will address the use primary literature in reinforcing major concepts and promoting scientific inquiry.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Neuroscience department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Promoting Academic Integrity in the Classroom

Dr. Christina Frei, Inaugural Executive Director of Languages

Tuesday, October 15 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bridget Swanson, CTL Fellow, Gemanic Languages and Literatures

Location: Max Kade German Culture and Media Center, 3401 Walnut St, Room 329 A

Summary: As Penn’s Guide to Academic Integrity maintains, academic honesty makes scholarship within and across disciplines possible. Faculty and instructors can help instill this core value in their students, both by exemplifying integrity and by employing methods that encourage honest practices. In this workshop, Dr. Christina Frei, Executive Director of Language Instruction in the School of Arts and Sciences, will help us develop strategies to promote academic integrity in our classrooms. This workshop will specifically address ways to:
• clearly articulate expectations and resources for students
• create assessments in a way that discourages cheating, plagiarism, and improper collaboration
• identify and appropriately respond to academic dishonesty when it occurs

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Gemanic Languages and Literatures department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

‘The myth of the perfect teacher’: Developing your own persona as a TA

Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Monday, October 14 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: ** 9/29: We regret that this session has to be rescheduled owing to illness. New date and time TBA. We apologize for any inconvenience. **

Many of us vividly remember the best teacher we ever had, and these teachers often serve as our role models for great teaching. What can we take away from these exemplars — and our other learning experiences — as we seek to develop our own individual teaching style? In this workshop we will talk about the choices you can make so as to shape a teaching persona consistent with your personality and goals as a teacher.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Providing Effective Written Feedback on Student Work

Bronwyn Wallace, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Monday, October 14 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Responding to your students’ writing should be about more than just assigning it a grade. This workshop will address best practices for responding to student writing in ways that are efficient and productive both for you and for your students. We will discuss how to establish clear priorities and goals for your students’ written work, and how to assess your students’ achievement of those goals. We will focus especially on how to make your assessment, including marginal and final comments, useful to your students in improving their performance on your essays and assignments.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Using Student Writing in Your Teaching

Professors Jorge Santiago-Aviles, Electrical and Systems Engineering, and Mark Yim, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Thursday, October 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Working with Students One-on-One

Sarah Nicolazzo, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Tuesday, October 8 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Meeting with students one-on-one offers you a chance to expand your teaching beyond what you can do the classroom. You can learn more about who your students are and how they’re doing in your course, help students who are struggling with key concepts or skills, and provide a space for students to engage more deeply with the fundamental methods of your discipline. Just as one-on-one meetings offer unique opportunities, they also require unique pedagogical skills. How do you ensure that your students feel comfortable asking you for help? How do you figure out what your students really need from you? How do you decide what to say to the student in front of you, and what do you do if the conversation becomes frustrating, tense, or just plain awkward? How do you help struggling students improve without answering their problem sets or writing their papers for them? In this workshop, we’ll address these questions and more, as we discuss and practice strategies that will help you get the most out of office hours and other one-on-one meetings.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Getting Students to Focus on the Process of Solving Problems: Beyond Plug and Chug

Rebecca Pierce, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Thursday, October 3 | 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Instructors in STEM disciplines often teach students who attempt to master the course material by focusing on the mechanics of solving the specific types of problems they encounter in the textbook, lectures, and problem sets. If left to their own devices, these plug-and-chuggers will not only have difficulty solving different problem types on exams, but will also obtain a poorer understanding of the fundamental course concepts. This in turn under-prepares the students for more advanced courses and ultimately their future careers. Fortunately, as instructors, we have the power to influence our students’ learning approaches though the methods we use in all aspects of our teaching. This workshop will discuss strategies that lead students away from a plug and chug approach toward a more rewarding process-based learning approach.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Managing Your Time While Teaching

Myrna Cohen, Director, Weingarten Learning Resource Center

Wednesday, October 2 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: How can you balance your own academic goals with your teaching responsibilities? What are the methods for accomplishing short- and long-range tasks while teaching a class or a recitation, holding office hours, and/or grading exams? In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to explore their own time management styles and take away additional strategies for taking control of their time. Additionally, iOS Apps for time and project management will be introduced.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Preparing Students for Exams

Julie McGurk, Associate Director, Center for Teaching and Learning

Wednesday, October 2 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: We often think preparing students for an exam begins the week before with a review session or additional office hours. This workshop will help you think about what you can do across the semester to help students prepare for exams. It will also help you think about what assumptions we make about our students – e.g., do they know how to study or how to write an essay? While the focus of this workshop will be on strategies for both preparing students prior to the exam and minimizing their anxiety in the days leading up to the exam, we will also discuss effective review session practices. The aim is to help you improve the effectiveness of how your students study, and, in the process, reduce the demands on your time when the next exam approaches.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Literary Theory and Method in the Classroom

Professor Rita Copeland, Kahn Endowed Term Professor of Classical Studies, English, and Comparative Literature

Monday, September 30 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Sarah Nicolazzo, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Location: Cherpack Lounge, 543 Williams Hall

Summary: A historical strength of comparative literature, as a field, is our shared interest in broad questions of literary theory and methodology. But how do we bring this strength into our teaching? How do we teach theory at the undergraduate level, and how might we reshape what “theory” means in the contemporary classroom? How do we transform the teaching of a text into an occasion to teach the broader methods of the field? Join us for a conversation with Professor Rita Copeland, as we think through these questions and consider ways to integrate our identities as scholars and teachers.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Comparative Literature department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Religious Studies Using Media: The Good, Bad and Indifferent

Professor Anthea Butler, Religious Studies

Thursday, September 26 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rose Muravchick, CTL Graduate Fellow, Reliigious Studies

Location: Cohen 204

Summary: Social media can be a powerful academic tool both inside the classroom and outside of it. In this workshop, Professor Butler will address the role that social media has played within her profession as a professor and public intellectual. How can academics utilize debates on social media and major news broadcasts as teaching tools inside the classroom, without them becoming reductionist? The role of Twitter, Facebook and Academia.edu in creating professional networks and fostering unique engagement between graduate students, professors and public intellectuals will also be addressed. Professor Butler will discuss how students today consume information via social networks and how this can often highlight stereotypes and biases which appear within the classroom.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Religious Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Fostering Active Discussion

Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Thursday, September 26 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: What makes a good discussion, and why is it so effective? What can you do—both before and during recitation—to create discussions that get students engaged, excited about the material, and learning how to think through problems during class? When and how should you moderate the conversations? What kinds of questions and formats work for different students and how might you vary formats to include everyone? In this workshop we will talk about these questions and think about how specific types of student-led activities and discussion formats can be used to create an environment in which students feel comfortable actively participating in the conversation.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Asking Good Questions in Class

Professors Rogers Smith, Political Science, and Emily Steiner, English

Thursday, September 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Recitation, the Remix: Creating and Using Innovative In-Class Activities

Rose Muravchick, CTL Graduate Fellow, Religious Studies

Wednesday, September 25 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: This workshop is designed to help instructors design and implement in-class activities that go beyond the traditional guided discussion. The topics covered will include how to best match an activity to a topic, how to use activities to change the pace or dynamic of the semester, and how to use activities as a way to assess students’ grasp of course materials. Participants will be introduced to a variety of classroom activities that can be used across multiple disciplines and within a variety of course formats.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate. Also counts as a follow-up workshop for participants in TA Training.

Working With Students One-on-One

Dr. Bruce Kothmann, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Tuesday, September 24 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Rebecca Pierce, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location: Skirkanich 504

Summary: When helping a student solve a challenging homework problem in office hours or debug a complicated design project in the lab, it is often tempting to tell him or her exactly what to do to finish the assignment. Though more frustrating at times, guiding the student as he or she discovers the correct answer on his or her own is a much more rewarding interaction and will lead to better learning for the student. In this workshop, Dr. Kothmann will lead a discussion focused on various strategies instructors can use to guide their students during one-on-one interactions.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the MEAM department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Political Classroom

Professor Suvir Kaul, English

Monday, September 23 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bronwyn Wallace, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: English Department Graduate Lounge (Fisher-Bennett Hall 330)

Summary: How is the literary classroom political? Especially when we teach texts or topics that do not immediately or explicitly announce themselves as politically charged, how do we, with our students, navigate their cultural and ideological commitments? What politics do we bring into the classroom with us as teachers, and how do we choose to disclose or conceal those commitments? What political or ethical questions and dilemmas inhere in the study of literature itself? Professor Suvir Kaul will share with us his experience as a teacher of poetry and of the literatures of the eighteenth century.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Neuroscience for novices: How to teach an introductory audience

Profesors Sharon Thompson-Schill, Psychology, and Geoffrey Aguirre, Neurology

Thursday, September 19 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tanya Weerakkody, CTL Graduate Fellow, Neuroscience

Location: 215 Stemmler Hall

Summary: This workshop will provide strategies for making scientific content accessible and engaging to audiences that are new to neuroscience. Professors Sharon Thompson-Schill and Geoffrey Aguirre will share insight on how to structure a single talk or entire course for novices. They will further discuss how didactic tools, use of technology, and teaching style can be best implemented to preserve scientific rigor without compromising clarity of subject matter.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Neuroscience department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engaging Modern Students with "Classic" Material

Professor James Ker, Classical Studies

Thursday, September 19 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jay Lucci, CTL Graduate Fellow, Classical Studies

Location: Classics Lounge, 2nd Floor Claudia Cohen Hall

Summary: As time passes and technology advances, it becomes increasingly difficult for students to relate to works of literature that are thousands of years old and getting older by the day. For many modern students, the ‘classics’ are simply no longer relevant. This workshop will explore various strategies for engaging students with material that they might otherwise find alien or intimidating. How do we get students excited about texts which, by virtue of their language, style, and/or date, are utterly ‘foreign’ to them? How can we convince them that this material still matters?
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Classical Studies department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching about 'the Other': How to engage students in the study of societies different from theirs

Professor Paul Cobb, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Monday, September 16 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Irene Sibbing Plantholt, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Location: Williams Hall 847 (NELC Conference Room)

Summary: In this workshop we will focus on how we as TAs and teachers can get students to be interested and even excited about a society that is geographically and chronologically far removed from theirs. How can we most effectively convey why students should care about what happened in the past or what happened in other parts of the world, especially when these students major in other (more contemporary) disciplines? What kind of strategies and assignments can we use to engage students in the Other, especially for those who cannot be immersed in that language and culture? How can we present our fields so that students one the one hand recognize the difference between them and people of past/other cultures (while avoiding Orientalism and exoticization), and on the other hand think about similarities? And ultimately: how can we make a course on the Other relevant to their career and life?

This workshop grows out of concerns in the NELC department and related fields, but everyone is welcome. We provide an open environment in which sharing and discussions between graduate students (and faculty) from different departments are deeply encouraged.

Bring lunch, we will provide dessert!

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Addressing the Heterogeneous Computer Science Classroom

Professors Benjamin Pierce & Steve Zdancewic, Computer & Information Science

Monday, September 16 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Richard Eisenberg, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer & Information Science

Location: Raisler Lounge (Towne 225)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Computer & Information Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Creating Community in the Classroom

Professors Kathryn Hellerstein and Yasemin Dayioglu-Yücel, Germanic Languages and Literatures

Tuesday, September 10 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bridget Swanson, CTL Fellow, Gemanic Languages and Literatures

Location: Max Kade German Culture and Media Center, 3401 Walnut St, Room 329 A

Summary: Authentic communication is key to effective pedagogy. But if students don’t feel comfortable to fully interact with their peers and instructor, authentic communication may remain elusive at best. How can an instructor foster inclusivity from the start? What activities best create a supportive learning environment? Finally, how does an instructor reach the many members of his/her diverse student body? In this year’s first departmental CTL workshop, Associate Professor Kathryn Hellerstein and DAAD Visiting Professor Yasemin Dayioglu-Yücel will lead a discussion of the various strategies they employ to cultivate inclusivity, acceptance, and a supportive learning environment in both language and content courses. Specifically, they will provide us with examples from classes they have taught on sensitive subjects – such as gender, racial, cross-national and political identities – in order to help us develop our own tools for creating classroom community.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Germanic Languages and Literatures department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

New Lecturer Orientation

Tuesday, August 27 | 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall 231

Summary: This orientation session is intended to introduce new lecturers at Penn to resources available to help them and policies that they will need to know. The session will be interactive and participants are encouraged to come with questions.

For more information, please contact CTL.

TA Training

Friday, August 23 | 9:00 pm - 12:45 pm

TA Training

Location: DRL A1 and Fisher-Bennett Hall

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

9:00-9:45 Teaching the Diversity of Penn Students (David Rittenhouse Labs A1)*
Bruce Lenthall, Director, Center for Teaching & Learning

10:00-11:00 Discussions on Challenges Facing TAs (Fisher Bennett Hall rooms TBA)

11:00-11:30 Coffee Break (TBA)

11:30-12:45 Discussions on Challenges Facing TAs (Fisher Bennett Hall rooms TBA)

Afternoon Departmental Workshops Contact your home department for information

2:00-4:00 Beginners Workshops on Blackboard or Canvas (Van Pelt Library, Goldstein Classroom)
Optional session. To register: http://bit.ly/13nDq5M

Being a TA in Philosophy

Professor Michael Weisberg, Philosophy

Friday, August 23 | 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Lindsey Fiorelli, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 492

Summary: We will discuss your role as a TA in philosophy and the responsibilities and possibilities that come with it. Participants will discuss the different kinds of duties TAs have, from running sections to grading and office hours, and concrete strategies for dealing with them. They will also talk about what to expect from Penn students as well as teaching styles and balancing TAing with course work and dissertation writing. Finally participants will consider TAing as professional development.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

TA Training

Thursday, August 22 | 9:00 am - 4:30 pm

TA Training

Location: Fisher-Bennett Hall (rooms TBA)

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

9-12 & 1:30-4:30 Teaching Demonstrations and Critiques (Williams Hall, rooms TBA)

Please note that all participants need to have prepared a 10-minute teaching demonstration in advance. Contact ctl-help@sas.upenn.edu for more information.

TA Training

Wednesday, August 21 | 9:00 am - 4:45 pm

TA Training

Location: Cohen 17 and Fisher-Bennett hall

Summary: This three-day program is required of all new TAs in Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Design. It is optional for new Annenberg TAs. All participants must register in advance.
New SAS TAs must also attend at least one in-semester follow-up workshop.

9:00-9:45 Welcoming Plenary (Cohen 17)
Bruce Lenthall, Director, Center for Teaching & Learning
Dennis DeTurck, Dean of the College
Eve Troutt Powell, Associate Dean for Graduate Studies

9:45-10:15 Your Role as a TA (Cohen 17)
Julie McGurck, Associate Director, Center for Teaching & Learning

10:15-10:45 Preparing for Your First Day (Cohen 17)
Ian Petrie, Senior Associate Director, Center for Teaching & Learning

10:45-11:00 Coffee Break (Lobby outside Cohen 17)

11:00-11:45 Support Resources for Your Students (Cohen 17)
Janet Tighe, Director of Academic Advising and Dean of Freshmen
Myrna Cohen, Executive Director, Weingarten Learning Resources Center
Nathaniel Amos, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)
Donna Brown, Director, Tutoring Center

11:45-12:30 Penn Policies and Resources (Cohen 17)
Sexual Violence and Harassment – Felicity Paxton, Director, Penn Women’s Center
Student Privacy – Maura Johnston, University Privacy Officer
Students with Disabilities – Susan Shapiro, Director, Student Disabilities Services
Academic Integrity – Michele Goldfarb, Director, Office of Student Conduct

2:00-4:45 Graduate Student-Led Workshops (Fisher Bennett Hall rooms TBA)
Leading Discussions in the Humanities and Qualitative Social Sciences
Grading in the Humanities and Qualitative Social Sciences
Grading in the Sciences and Quantitative Social Sciences
Recitations in the Sciences and Quantitative Social Sciences
Leading Effective Lab Sessions
Leading Discussions in the Quantitative Sciences and Social Sciences