Events



Spring 2013

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Coursera Course Proposal Workshop

Tuesday, May 7 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Fisher-Bennett 224

Summary: This workshop is intended for faculty who are interested in submitting a proposal to teach a Coursera course. In this workshop we will discuss ideas to consider in proposing – and designing – a course, including your goals for the course, the ways you might achieve those goals in the open online platform, and reasons why the material you want to teach is suited to the open online audience.

Teaching With Digital Humanities

Dr. Mitch Fraas, Bollinger Fellow for Library Innovation

Thursday, May 2 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 209

Summary: Join Van Pelt Library’s digital humanities expert, historian Mitch Fraas, for a discussion about opportunities to use digital resources in the classroom. The workshop will include digital resources to enhance your teaching, as well as exciting ways to introduce your students to digital tools and assignments. Mitch will have some examples to demonstrate, but feel free to contact the convener at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) for specific requests.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Coursera Course Proposal Workshop

Wednesday, May 1 | 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Faculty Events

Location: Fisher-Bennett 224

Summary: This workshop is intended for faculty who are interested in submitting a proposal to teach a Coursera course. In this workshop we will discuss ideas to consider in proposing – and designing – a course, including your goals for the course, the ways you might achieve those goals in the open online platform, and reasons why the material you want to teach is suited to the open online audience.

Women in the Business School Classroom

Professors Emilie Feldman and Roxana Barbulescu, Management

Tuesday, April 30 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Location: Steinberg-Dietrich Hall 2034

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Management Department at the Wharton School and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL certificate.

What is the History of Technology and How do we Teach It?

Professors Daniel Barber, Architecture and John Tresch, History and Sociology of Science

Thursday, April 25 | 11:30 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Design

Location: Furness 306

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Design and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL certificate.

Using Demos in the Classroom

Dr. Susan Phillips, Physical Chemistry Coordinator, Chemistry

Wednesday, April 24 | 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: General Chemistry Laboratories (1st floor of the chemistry building)

Summary: In this workshop, we will discuss how demonstrations can be used effectively in the classroom and will gain hands-on experience performing and explaining several demos.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Supporting and encouraging women and minorities in STEM fields

Professor Katherine Kuchenbecker, Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics, and Professor Paul Heiney, Physics

Tuesday, April 23 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Location: DRL 3W2

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in Physics and Engineering and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Bringing your clinical background to teaching

Professor, Sarah Kagan, Nursing

Tuesday, April 23 | 1:45 pm - 2:45 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Maxim Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin Hall room 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Nursing School and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Teaching with Visuals: Powerpoint and the Chalkboard

Professors Jason Burdick, Bioengineering, and CJ Taylor, Computer and Information Science

Monday, April 22 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 108

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Making the Transition to Junior Faculty

Kathleen Baldanza, Assistant Professor of History, Penn State

Friday, April 19 | 10:00 am - 11:59 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, EALC

Location: Williams 816

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching with Images

Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Wednesday, April 17 | 2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: An image can be historically significant, culturally meaningful, formally innovative or politically motivated. Sometimes it is all of those things and more. This workshop will focus on strategies for getting the most out of the images that you use in class. We will discuss the tension between the directions a rich image can take a class and the drawbacks of overwhelming students. We will also consider the advantages and disadvantages of complex versus simple images. Participants are encouraged to bring images that they have taught with or anticipate teaching with to the workshop.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Paper Practicalities: What We Assign, How Much and When

Professors Peter Holquist, History, and Paul Saint-Amour, English

Wednesday, April 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

All My Best Students Have Been in Prison

Professor Alexander Guerrero, Philosophy

Wednesday, April 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 493

Summary: Dr. Alex Guerrero will talk about his experience teaching in correctional facilities and some of the general pedagogical lessons gleaned from that experience.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields. Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Coursera: The View from the Trenches

Professor Michael Kearns, Computer and Information Science

Wednesday, April 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Moore 102 (DSL conference room)

Summary: Massively Open, Online Courses (MOOCs) have risen to prominence in the
last few years with the efforts of companies like Coursera, Edx, and
Udacity. People have hailed MOOCs as the beginning of a
higher-education revolution, one that promises to change how a college
course is delivered for both students and professors alike. However,
are MOOCs the next big thing in education or simply an online fad that
will fade away in the coming years?

Professor Michael Kearns, CIS professor and founding director of the
Penn program in Networked and Social Systems Engineering (NETS), gave
the flagship course of the program, Networked Life, over Coursera this
past Fall. In this seminar, he will sit down and give his first-hand
viewpoint on Coursera and the MOOCs. In particular, he will talk
about how he thinks future courses will be shaped by MOOCs, and how
we, as educators, can do a better job as a result.

Unconscious Biases in the Classroom

Professor Karen Beckman, History of Art

Tuesday, April 16 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Location: Jaffe 104

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History of Art department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Use and Abuse of History in Architecture Education

Professor Joan Ockman, Architecture

Tuesday, April 16 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Design

Location: Furness 302

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Design and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

RESCHEDULED for FUTURE DATE! Designing and Using Group Projects in a Management Course

Professor John Paul MacDuffie, Management

Tuesday, April 16 | 12:00 am - 11:59 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Location: Steinberg Dietrich 2034

Summary: PLEASE NOTE: This workshop will be rescheduled but will not happen April 16! Consult this website for a new date sometime next week.

Drawing on his experience designing and administering a Field Application Project over several years, Professor McDuffie will lead a discussion on the key decisions involved in designing and effectively implementing group projects in a management course.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Management department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Counts toward the CTL certificate.

Building Communities Beyond the Classroom: The Use of Technology in Language Instruction

Drs. Jacqueline Dougherty and Mélanie Perón (Romance Languages), Dr. Kate McMahon, Director of the French Language Program, Department of Romance Languages, and Professor Nicoletta Marini-Maio (Italian, Dickinson College)

Monday, April 15 | 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Location: Cherpack Lounge (543 Williams Hall)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Romance Languages department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Developing a Radical Skills-Based Pedagogy

Dr. Alexine Fleck, Community College of Philadelphia

Monday, April 15 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher Bennett Hall 330 (Graduate Student Lounge)

Summary: Join Alexine Fleck, Penn PhD alum and current professor at Philadelphia Community College, for a conversation on what she terms a “radical skills-based approach to teaching.” This workshop is designed to help us think about how your pedagogy is informed by the type of institution you’re at; the different concerns that arise at a non-research university; dealing with a more diverse student population (particularly in terms of academic preparedness); and the practical tips and tools that we can use to make our classroom experiences more rewarding for all members of the class. Lunch is served.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Techniques of the Critic

Professors Annette Fierro, Architecture and Jackie Tileston, Fine Arts

Friday, April 12 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Design

Location: Furness 306

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Design school and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Writing Letters of Recommendation (& Other Formal Evaluations of Students)

Professor Frederick Dickinson, History, and Professor Sarah Barringer Gordon, Constitutional Law and History

Thursday, April 11 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 214

Summary: This workshop will focus on crafting written evaluations, such as letters of recommendation and other formal assessments of student capacities. Using concrete samples, Professors Frederick Dickinson and Sarah Barringer Gordon will share their advice and expertise on a range of topics surrounding formal letters, ranging from foundational matters like expected length and tone of address, to more delicate issues, such as discussing students’ shortcomings or when it is appropriate to decline requests to write a letter.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields. Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Interdisciplinary Teaching or Teaching Outside Your Discipline

Professor Julie Fairman, Nursing

Wednesday, April 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Maxim Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin Hall room 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Women in the Foreign Language Classroom

Dr. Lidia Léon-Blázquez, Romance Languages

Wednesday, April 10 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Location: Cherpack Lounge (543 Williams Hall)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Romance Languages department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching With and Outside the Canon

Professors Ann Kutner and Michael Leja, History of Art

Tuesday, April 9 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Location: Jaffe 104

Summary: When we teach we invariably create narratives, think in sequences of events and choose some examples or objects instead of others. How do we remain thoughtful about these choices? Join Professor Ann Kuttner and Professor Michael Leja as they discuss their own relation to the canon and how they change and reorder the objects they teach with. Topics up for discussion include the canon of methods and approaches; historical canons; weird, outlying objects; the unavoidability of canons; and sequencing and defining a period. The discussion will be centered on how to put objects first and then how to, very thoughtfully, work from there.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History of Art department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Strategies for Interactive Lecturing

Maxim Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Tuesday, April 9 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Engaging students in learning is one proven strategy to improve understanding and retention of the course content. This workshop aims to provide participants with the interactive tools to promote engagement within the lecture format. First, we will briefly address some of the theoretical reasons for the importance of interactive teaching and learning. Then, we will focus on concrete strategies (including technology and small group work) that will promote interaction in your classroom. We will discuss disciplinary differences in application of these strategies as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods of getting students to interact during lecture.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Your Own Class

Professors Elizabeth Camp and Daniel J. Singer, Philosophy

Monday, April 8 | 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 493

Summary: This workshop discusses different aspects of designing a philosophy class. Topics discussed will include: picking engaging and rewarding readings (and the right amount of them), gauging and addressing student needs and interests, making and spacing assignments (for fair, useful and efficient evaluation), and incorporating student driven elements (such as discussions, presentations, debates and student chosen assignment topics).
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Adapting Your Teaching to Different Student Populations

Professor Amy Sarch, Shenandoah University

Friday, April 5 | 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: *NOTE NEW LOCATION* Annenberg School 111

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Reflections on the First Year of Teaching

Professor Sonia Velázquez, Hispanic Studies

Thursday, April 4 | 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Location: Cherpack Seminar Room (543 Williams Hall)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Romance Languages department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching difference in multiple ways: Through content and presence

Professor Cheryl Jones-Walker, Swarthmore

Thursday, April 4 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education and Sociology

Location: GSE 424

Summary: I have used an auto-ethnographic approach to explore my experiences teaching two courses at a small, predominately white, liberal arts college. These classes present unique cases to examine my role as a teacher of color, teaching about “difference” in this context. The core introductory course for the department does not bear diversity, race, class or examinations of social inequality in the course title although these are key themes. Introduction to Education is a jointly designed course that has nearly identical class readings and assignments in the two or three sections offered each semester. The second, a course on urban education, is one that I have taught at the college once independently and later collaboratively with a white male colleague who is also junior faculty. Teaching the same course material as my white colleagues and having different interactions with students related to intersections of race, gender and class is fertile ground to examine how teacher identity informs classroom processes. Similarly, co-teaching a course that explicitly takes up unequal educational opportunities, the role of race/racism, nationality, language and class in American schooling yielded compelling personal narratives. The cultural accounting of the relationship between my students and I helps me make meaning as it aids in the identification of future pedagogical adjustments. At the same time the questions raised are central to my main research interests: 1) developing better theoretical frameworks to understand identity construction in the context of classrooms; 2) creating safe spaces in educational contexts to expand identities and explore social inequity.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Education school and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Gender Dynamics in the Classroom

Professor Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw, History of Art, and Evelyn Thomson, Physics

Wednesday, April 3 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Teaching Guidelines and Instructions for New and Experienced Faculty

Professor Witold Henisz, Management

Wednesday, April 3 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Convener: JR Keller, CTL Fellow, Management

Location: Steinberg Dietrich 2034

Summary: Last year, an informal group of Wharton faculty compiled a list of guidelines and suggestions designed to enhance the quality of instruction and classroom experience for MBA students and faculty. One result of those discussions was the creation of the Wharton Instruction Checklist. We will use this checklist to guide a discussion of the details we often overlook in our teaching. Lunch will be provided.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Management department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Interpreting Your Teaching Evaluations – Using Student Feedback to Improve Your Teaching

Professors Paulo Arratia, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and Dan Bogen, Bioengineering

Monday, April 1 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Levine 307

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Teaching Students to Think Like Historians: Revisiting the Fundamentals

Professor Kathleen Brown, History, and Jessie Regunberg, Ph.D. Candidate in History

Monday, April 1 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 214

Summary: As every TA rapidly learns, history recitations have a standard format: we guide students through the process of critically reading primary sources and understanding the arguments of secondary sources. But this does not always leave room for the students to experience for themselves the wonder and confusion of encountering a source for the first time, the thrill of the hunt to understand its production and context, and the satisfaction of building an argument based on hard-won knowledge. Professor Kathleen Brown will reflect on the challenges and pleasures of teaching students to undergo this process and to learn to think like historians. She will share her experience constructing an experimental course intended to train students in these fundamental skills. Jessie Regunberg, Prof. Brown’s TA for this course, will offer a first-hand perspective on implementing these techniques in recitations.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Beyond PowerPoint: Technology in the Classroom

Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Wednesday, March 27 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Technology in the classroom goes beyond presentation software like PowerPoint.
From websites and wikis, to videos-on-demand, educational technology promises to help enhance and democratize the classroom. However, what educational problems can we solve with technology, and how can we best utilize technology to solve them? In this workshop, we will discuss the pragmatics of educational technology —- What sorts of educational technology are available? What problems can they solve? How can we use them effectively? —- as well as share our own experiences with using educational technology in the classroom.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Overcoming Biases in the Classroom

Professor Marsha Lester, Chemistry, and Judith Currano, Chemistry Librarian

Wednesday, March 27 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: Makineni Conference Room (2nd floor of the Cret wing of the chemistry building)

Summary: In this workshop we will work to identify unconscious biases that we may be expressing in the classroom and consider the effects of biases on our students’ performance and development.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Using Debate as an Assignment

Professor Ryan Muldoon, Philosophy, Politics and Economics

Wednesday, March 27 | 10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 337

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Professorship at different institutions

Professors Mark Trodden, Physics, Paul Angiolillo (Physics, Saint Joseph's University) and Suzanne Amador Kane (Physics, Haverford College)

Tuesday, March 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:20 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Location: DRL 3W2

Summary: Professorship at different institutions
Faculty representing three different types of institution discuss the challenges and opportunities of teaching physics in these settings
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Physics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Asking Good Discussion Questions

Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Monday, March 25 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Asking questions is a practice used by most instructors in most classrooms; however, asking good questions is a skill that takes both careful planning and lots of practice. This workshop is designed to help cultivate that skill. What makes a good question? The answer depends, in part, on the circumstances. In this workshop, we will discuss some of the many considerations that go into determining how to make the best use of classroom questioning, including timing, class size, types of students, and class goals. We will also talk about some of the many functions a question can serve. We will also spend time thinking about strategies for fielding student responses, including what to do when students do not give the desired response. Ultimately, this workshop is an opportunity to think and work collaboratively with your peers in an effort to identify which questioning strategies will work best for you in your classroom and convert classroom questions from mere ‘filler’ into effective teaching tools.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Getting a Teaching-Focused Position in Academia

Dr. Chris Murphy, Lecturer, CIS, and Dr. Adam Aviv, Visiting Assistant Professor (Computer Science, Swarthmore)

Monday, March 25 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Levine 307

Summary: The benefit of being at a top-tier research institution is that there
is an abundance of guidance towards building your career as a
researcher and then pursuing research-focused academic positions at
places like Penn. The downside is that there is comparatively less
guidance on how to obtain more teaching-focused academic positions
such as lecturers or faculty at smaller, liberal arts colleges. How
does the teaching academic job hunt differ from the research academic
job hunt? What are employers looking for in these positions? How do
you set yourself up to pursue these sorts of jobs when you graduate?

CIS lecturer Chris Murphy and recent CIS PhD graduate Adam Aviv share
their experiences pursuing teaching-focused positions in academia.
They will cover the breadth of academic positions available to people
that would like to emphasize education in addition to or above
research, how the teaching-focused job hunt is different from the
traditional research-focused job hunt, and what they feel are the key
qualifications for securing such a position.

Teaching Students to Read Critically

Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Thursday, March 21 | 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Students’ fruitful engagement with texts is often key to their success in class. In this workshop we will find strategies for helping students develop better reading skills. Questions we will pursue include the following. What difficulties do students encounter in following and in working through a text? What is critical reading as opposed to what we might call ordinary reading? What questions should students bring to a text in reading critically? What are virtues of a critical reader? We will address these questions both at a general and at a discipline specific level and we will develop a template for worksheets that can help students with critical reading.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Training Students as Researchers

Professor Diana Mutz, Communication and Political Science

Wednesday, March 20 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg School 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Using Student Presentations

Bryan Jones, CTL Graduate Fellow, Hispanic Studies

Tuesday, March 19 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In-class student presentations have become a common method of evaluation in many different types of classrooms. In this workshop, we will gauge the value of student presentations, both as a means of evaluating the presenters’ learning and as a pedagogical tool for other students. We will also discuss a variety of types of student presentations that may offer alternative styles or activities for your classroom. Finally, we will cover different strategies that instructors can use to incorporate these projects effectively and efficiently into their courses, including how to plan for the presentations and how to limit the time and focus of each presentation.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Visual Design of Presentations

Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Design

Monday, March 18 | 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In many fields, the delivery of a lecture is accompanied by a visual presentation (in PowerPoint, Keynote, Prezi, etc.) the design of which can either detract from or enhance the clear communication of information, and thus significantly impact student learning. Things like colors, font sizes, hierarchies of text and image, slide transitions, and even the amount of content within a single slide can either confuse and distract a student or, when used effectively, help keep them interested and engaged. And while all these things are important, foremost in the lecturer’s mind should always be the question of the function of each visual and how it might contribute to a student’s understanding of the material presented. This workshop will focus on such aspects of the visual design of presentations, discussing both the design of slides themselves and the design of their correlation with a spoken lecture. This will include a conversation on the various roles of visual information accompanying a lecture, a discussion and critique of given examples of presentation slides, and a review of various strategies and techniques for enhancing and clarifying the graphic communication of presentations. Feel free to bring a laptop to explore and experiment with ideas as they are discussed. While some demonstrations will be made via PowerPoint, this workshop will focus on general principles applicable to any program one might use to produce a visual presentation.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Offering Options for Assignments and Assessment

Professor Mary Beth Gasman, Education

Friday, March 15 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education

Location: Solomon Labs A30

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Education school and so may be most useful to students in related fields. Counts toward the CTL Certificate.

The Flipped Classroom: Lessons from MIT

Professor John Belcher, Physics, MIT

Friday, March 15 | 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Fisher-Bennett 401

Summary: The Physics department at MIT has been using the flipped classroom for over a decade now and has demonstrated a positive impact on student learning. Professor John Belcher has been the driving force behind this project, and he will be sharing with us his experiences in transitioning to an active classroom. If you would like to find out more about the project at MIT, you can visit their website.

Issues in Curriculum Design

Professor, Richard Wesley, Architecture

Thursday, March 14 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Eric Bellin, CTL Graduate Fellow, Design

Location: Meyerson 207

Summary: As chair of Penn’s undergraduate program in Architecture and former chair of the graduate program, Richard wesley has studies and been heavily involved in the development and implementation of architecture curricula. This session will be centered on various issues in the structuring of an architect’s education, ranging from larger questions about the meaning of curriculum in general and the rationale in course sequencing, to the discussion of particular curricular models to the requirements for program accreditation and the various ways they might be satisfied.

While this session is intended primarily for students at the PhD and MS levels, all who have interest in architectural pedagogy are welcome.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Design and so may be most useful to students in related fields.

Putting Together a Syllabus

Professor Paul R. Goldin

Thursday, March 14 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, EALC

Location: Williams 816

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Traveling Professor: Teaching Before A Tenure-Track Job

Dr. Alex Posecznick, Education

Thursday, March 14 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education and Sociology

Location: Graduate School of Education room 322

Summary: This workshop will address teaching at different institutions, and the opportunities and challenges of non-tenure track teaching.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Education School and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The art of homework and exam problem design

Professor Phil Nelson, Physics

Monday, March 11 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Location: DRL 4E19

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Physics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Preparing for Your Teaching Portfolio While You're Teaching

Professor Jed Esty, English

Monday, March 11 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher Bennett Hall 330 (Graduate Student Lounge)

Summary: In this workshop, we’ll talk about what you should be doing while you’re teaching and TA’ing to prepare for eventually creating a teaching portfolio. This workshop is designed to be useful to students at all stages of the PhD, from those who have not yet taught to those who are ABD. Lunch will be provided.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Tailoring Your Teaching to Diverse Audiences

Professor Julie (Aaron) Himmelberger, Biochemistry, DeSales University

Friday, March 8 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: Makineini Room (2nd floor of the chemistry building)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Discussing Sensitive Topics in the Classroom

Professor John Jackson, Communication and Anthropology

Thursday, February 28 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg School 224

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing and Delivering Lectures

Professor Cheikh Babou and Professor Steve Hahn, History

Thursday, February 28 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 214

Summary: Professors Cheikh Babou and Steve Hahn will lead a discussion on designing and delivering lectures. They will reflect on the process of constructing lectures for the first time, and offer their expertise on developing lectures throughout your professional career.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
Helping Struggling Students

David Pope, Materials Science and Engineering Alejandro Ribeiro, Electrical and Systems Engineering

Wednesday, February 27 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Towne 225, Raisler Lounge

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Replacing Blackboard, Teaching with Canvas

Professors Andrew Rappe, Chemistry, and Florian Schwarz, Linguistics

Tuesday, February 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 104

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Teaching Writing in Philosophy Classes

Dr. Valerie Ross, Director, Penn Critical Writing Program and Dr. Doug Paletta, Associate Director, Penn Critical Writing Program

Monday, February 25 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Convener: Wiebke Deimling, CTL Graduate Fellow, Philosophy

Location: Cohen 493

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Philosophy department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Bringing the Museum into the Classroom

Professor Adam Smith, EALC

Friday, February 22 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, EALC

Location: Williams 421

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in East Asian Languages and Cultures department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Introductory Level Courses

Professor Lothar Haselberger, History of Art

Thursday, February 21 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Location: Jaffe 104

Summary: In making the transition from graduate student to our first job, we will need to design courses: for the job interview, for the new job. But what do we know about designing courses? Enter Professor Lothar Haselberger, designer of one of the History of Art Department’s most popular introductory level courses. Join Prof. Haselberger as he shares some of the tricks of the trade, including designing courses to take advantage of their location, including field trips; mixing exams with papers; putting together syllabi; discussing how maybe even he didn’t get it right the first time around.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History of Art department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Your Own Course

Carolyn Chernoff, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education

Thursday, February 21 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Whether you are on the job market now, adjuncting, or considering future options, designing your own course can alternately inspire joy and panic. This interactive workshop will focus on key elements of course design. We will focus on syllabus construction from readings, central questions, assignments, grading rubrics, to student takeaways, and also address revamping existing courses or working with an inherited syllabus. This workshop will focus on backwards planning, or designing a course with student learning goals in mind. Participants will leave this workshop with a sense of their own teaching goals and a better understanding of syllabus and course creation.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Art of the Computer Science Exam

Professor Benjamin Pierce, Computer & Information Science

Thursday, February 21 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, CIS

Location: Levine 307

Summary: What use is an exam in a computer science or engineering course? It’s not like we expect our students to be writing programs or designing algorithms in the real world in one-to-two hour crunch-mode chunks. Furthermore, one of the most frequent complaints by students in our courses concerns exams, e.g., their length, difficulty, or relevance. When should we use exams, and how do we design and grade exams that are fair and meet the learning goals we’ve set forth?

Professor Benjamin Pierce will present his philosophy on exams in a computer science course and answer the following questions: What value do exams bring to a computer science classroom? How do you craft a meaningful exam? How do you grade an exam?

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Computer and Information Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Making the Classroom a More Democratic Space

Professor Salamisha Tillet, English

Tuesday, February 19 | 12:30 pm - 1:45 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher Bennett Hall 330 (Graduate Student Lounge)

Summary: What does it mean for our classroom to be a “democratic space’? In this workshop, we will consider the various ways in which we can make the classroom more open and inclusive for all members of our class. We will discuss the role of group work and collaborative projects in creating a more democratic classroom, as well as the ways in which teaching about group identity can also help us move towards a more democratic classroom space.

All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Small Group Work *(note the date of this workshop has changed)*

JR Keller, CTL Graduate Fellow, Management

Thursday, February 14 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In this workshop, we will discuss how to use small groups in your classroom. We will discuss when and why small groups are most effective, how to form groups, group size and duration, different structures for group work, how to foster group interaction, group work learning techniques, and how to evaluate small groups. We will also have to time cover any specific questions or concerns that participants have.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum:
The Flipped Classroom: Conveying Content Outside of Class and Getting Students Problem-solving in Lecture Time

Professor Arjun Raj, Bioengineering

Thursday, February 14 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Levine 512

Summary: The Engineering Faculty Teaching Forum brings together faculty from across SEAS for informal conversations about teaching. Each discussion focuses on a different theme and is moderated by two faculty members. All faculty, from experienced to novice teachers, are invited to participate. To encourage open discussion, registration is limited twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Effective Grading and Feedback

Professor Lynn Sommers, Nursing

Wednesday, February 13 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Max Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The teaching duality: Keeping classes interesting & engaging from the introductory to the graduate

Professor Mirjam Cvetic, Physics

Wednesday, February 13 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Location: DRL 3C2

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Physics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Students to Think Like Scientists

Olivia Padovan-Merhar, CTL Graduate Fellow, Physics

Monday, February 11 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: When teaching science to students who are not (yet) scientists, what do we want them to learn? Do we want students to leave the class having memorized the important formulas, or do we want them to understand how scientific hypotheses are conceptualized and experiments are performed? This workshop will focus on techniques to encourage students to look beyond equations and begin to think like scientists. We will discuss classroom activities and assessment strategies to support and encourage scientific thinking.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Faculty-to-Faculty Lunch:
Mentoring Graduate Students in their Research

Professors Michael Katz, History, and Michael Weisberg, Philosophy

Monday, February 11 | 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Faculty Events

Location: Cohen 204

Summary: Faculty-to-Faculty Lunches are opportunities for small groups of faculty to get together for informal conversation about teaching. Each lunch focuses on a different theme and is moderated two faculty members, who will guide the discussion and share their experiences. To encourage interactive discussion, registration is limited to twelve faculty.
The Center for Teaching and Learning provides lunch for all those who register in advance.

Lecturing to Intro Level Classes

Professor Larry Silver, History of Art

Thursday, February 7 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Will Schmenner, CTL Graduate Fellow, History of Art

Location: Jaffe 104

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History of Art department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Creating Good Essay Questions in the Humanities and Qualitative Social Sciences

Matthew Kruer, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Tuesday, February 5 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: This workshop will consider the exercise of crafting questions for writing assignments. Generating prompts for papers and exams is a common aspect of teaching courses, and all instructors strive to elicit the most thoughtful, focused, and intellectually rigorous responses from their students. This workshop will foster a conversation about ways to formulate such questions. It will focus on identifying and articulating the instructor’s pedagogical goals, communicating those goals to students, and achieving them through well-formed questions.

All graduate students are welcome. This event focuses on written questions, and may be most useful to students in the humanities and social sciences. Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Gender Dynamics In and Out of the Classroom

Emily Gerstell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Monday, February 4 | 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In this workshop, we’ll talk about how gender – both your own identity and that of your students – can impact your teaching in ways both positive and negative. We’ll consider how gender dynamics work in the classroom – not only between you and your students and but also between students – as well as how gender dynamics affect your role as a teacher when you are outside the classroom (e.g. in office hours, as a mentor, around setting boundaries, around setting expectations about availability, etc.). We’ll also work on practical tips and strategies for addressing issues that arise around gender dynamics in and out of the classroom.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Interactive Classes in the Sciences

Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Wednesday, January 30 | 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: The traditional method of teaching science to undergraduate students can be generally described as a transmission model, in which an instructor takes center stage in the lecture hall, passing on knowledge for the students to absorb. But recent studies have shown that student-centered, active learning environments lead to better retention of information, better development of critical thinking skills, and higher levels of engagement with the course and the material. In this workshop, we will explore the benefits and challenges of the transmission and interactive models, ask what an interactive classroom looks and feels like, and develop the skills and confidence to apply this approach to our own teaching.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Sensitive Subjects

Madeline Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Tuesday, January 29 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: This workshop aims to develop practical strategies for leading students through difficult subjects and provide an opportunity for new teachers to discuss some of the most rewarding and fruitful work that they do. We will consider thoughtful and imaginative ways for broaching sensitive topics and develop strategies to reorient a discussion that appears to be running out of control. This workshop will also consider building effective relationships between students and instructors so that students feel comfortable talking in situations where they might prefer not to and instructors feel that students will be able to engage difficult issues and materials in an effective and meaningful way.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Maximizing the Value of the T.A. Experience

Dean Michael X. Delli Carpini, Annenberg School for Communication

Monday, January 28 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Derek Blackwell, CTL Graduate Fellow, Communication

Location: Annenberg School 225

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Annenberg School for Communication and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Texts in Translation

Professor, Victor Mair, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Friday, January 25 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeline Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, EALC

Location: Williams 421

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in EALC department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Texts in Translation

Professor Victor Mair, East Asian Languages and Cultures

Friday, January 25 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Madeleine Wilcox, CTL Graduate Fellow, EALC

Location: Williams 421

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Encouraging Female Participation in Computer Science

Professor Susan Davidson, Computer and Information Science

Thursday, January 24 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Peter-Michael Osera, CTL Graduate Fellow, Computer and Information Science

Location: Levine 307

Summary: Historically, women have been greatly underrepresented in Computer Science and other STEM disciplines. Why is it important that we work towards changing this statistic, and how we can do so in the classroom? Professor Susan Davidson, CIS department chair, shares her thoughts on how to encourage female participation in the Computer Science classroom.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Computer and Information Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Making the Transition from Graduate Student to Professor

Professor Salimah Meghani, Nursing

Wednesday, January 23 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Max Topaz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin 300

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Using Active Learning in Recitations

Professor Don Berry, Chemistry

Monday, January 14 | 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Ursula Williams, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: IAST 2000 (Vagelos wing of the chemistry building)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.