Events



Where to Begin? Structuring Your Lessons

Professor Emily Steinlight, English

Thursday, September 3 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dianne Mitchell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett 330

Summary: Having a clear and realistic plan for each lesson can take away a lot of the stress of being a new teacher – but it’s also one of our trickiest tasks. This workshop will introduce some ways to structure your class effectively. How should a class begin? What are good ways to maintain student interest and participation? And what role should “teaching style” play in lesson planning? We’ll cover these issues and more.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Canvas Grade Book Bootcamp

Joseph Schaffer, Canvas Support and Catherine Turner, Center for Teaching and Learning

Thursday, September 10 | 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: WIC Seminar Room (Van Pelt Library 124)

Summary: Setting up a gradebook on Canvas takes some time but once it is done,
your semester can often run more smoothly: calculating grades is
automated for you and your students see their grades without troubling you. This workshop will begin by showing the basics
of grade book and some tips and tricks about using grade book from the
library Canvas support staff and the Center for Teaching and Learning.
Then for the most part, this workshop will provide participants with
structure and time to get started on their own Canvas grade book. The
facilitators from the library and from CTL will be there to answer
questions and help when they can. Participants can come for some or all
of the time. Laptops will be provided to participants who want them or
participants may bring their own.
Please note that this is not a follow up workshop for TA training.

Keeping Students Engaged During Lectures

Professor Lyle Ungar, Computer & Information Science

Thursday, September 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Naomi Fitter, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Location: Towne Building, room 225

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching in the Margins: Responding in Writing to Student Work

Professor Paul Saint-Amour, English

Tuesday, September 22 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dianne Mitchell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett 330

Summary: Evaluating and commenting on student writing is a big part of our job as teachers and instructors in the humanities. But we don’t always think of it as “teaching.” In this workshop, we’ll discuss how to turn the chore of writing feedback into a pedagogical opportunity. We’ll talk about what kind of comments are most effective for fostering improvement in written work – and how to get students to actually read them!
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Lessons From Forty Years of Teaching

Professor Emeritus Jack Nagel, Political Science

Tuesday, September 22 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Osman Balkan, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Location: Stiteler Hall, Silverstein Forum

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Political Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

What I Learned: Confessions of Second-Year Teaching Assistants

Tuesday, September 22 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Kristian Taketomo, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Location: College Hall 214

Summary: What do you wish you had known before you started teaching? What lessons did you learn in your first year as a TA? At the History Department’s inaugural CTL workshop of 2015-2016, three veteran TAs will reflect upon their first years leading the college classroom. Panelists Ayelet Brinn, Josef Nothmann, and Camille Suarez will revisit their experiences designing lesson plans, leading discussion, and assessing student performance as first-time TAs. They will recount what worked, what they would have done differently, and what advice they would give to their former selves. The panelists will also discuss their individual teaching philosophies and how their philosophies evolved as the year progressed. This panel is open to everyone from all levels of teaching experience. Whether you are simply curious about TAing, have just been assigned your first section, or are a seasoned pedagogue, you are invited to join our conversation.

Small Fish in a Big Pond: Meeting the Challenges of the Large Lecture Class

Dr. Kirsten Hickerson, Nursing

Tuesday, September 22 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tim Sowicz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin 300

Summary: Teaching in any environment can feel intimidating, but teaching in a large lecture hall can feel overwhelming. This workshop will address ways in which educators can overcome “stage fright,” and effectively teach to large groups in a big space. Strategies for keeping a large number of students engaged, various methods of conveying course content, and getting to know students individually will also be discussed.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

How to Craft an Engaging Lecture

Professor Paul Cobb, Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations

Wednesday, September 23 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Raha Rafii, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages & CIvilizations

Location: Willams Hall, room 844

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Modeling Best (K-12) Teaching Practices in the University Classroom

Professor Abby Reisman, Education

Thursday, September 24 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Katie Clonan-Roy, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education

Location: GSE 427

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Graduate School of Education and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Giving Effective Feedback on Student Assignments

Dianne Mitchell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Tuesday, September 29 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: How can we be great teachers even when we’re doing that most dreaded task – evaluating written work? In this workshop, we’ll discuss how to turn a task that produces anxiety in both teachers and students into a valuable pedagogical exercise. Feedback on essays and other assignments comes in many forms, and we’ll think about the merits and drawbacks of several of these methods. By approaching our task from the perspective of teaching rather than simply evaluating, we’ll discover that giving feedback can not only be less painful but help us meet our classroom goals, whether those are mastery of course material, improvement in students’ writing, or both.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Activities for Discussion

Alison Howard, CTL Graduate Fellow, Comparative Literature

Tuesday, September 29 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Many instructors cite “fostering discussion” as a priority in the classroom, but implementing these discussions can prove challenging. How do we encourage students to speak? How do we keep them on task? How do we manage overeager students? Shy students? Students who haven’t done the readings? This workshop will explore a number of different activities designed to engender productive discussions and will address such issues as choosing an activity that matches your goals; preparing for discussion; priming students for discussion; effectively managing activities; incorporating texts/images/data into discussion; and holding students accountable for their role during discussion.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Synthesis and Characterization of the Model TA

Professor Larry Sneddon, Chemistry and Teresa Rapp and Mike Noss, Graduate TAs, Chemistry

Tuesday, September 29 | 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Kyle Smith, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: Vagelos 2000

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Identities in the Classroom: Yours and Your Students'

Raha Rafii, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations

Thursday, October 1 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: The university classroom aspires to have students from a wide variety of backgrounds and identities so that students’ ideas can be enriched with fresh and different perspectives. These identities – racial, ethnic, gender/sexual, religious, socio-economic, feminist, conservative, immigrant, etc. – run the gamut, and can pose teaching challenges even when they are not the focus of classroom topics. This workshop will enable participants to share various teaching strategies on managing personal sensitivities in the classroom as well as students’ undeveloped ideas about core aspects of other students’ identities. We will also discuss useful resources and various methods of creating an inclusive and safe learning environment that at the same time encourages students to critically examine how their identities impact their assumptions and thought processes.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Helping Students Approach Learning in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Kristian Taketomo, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Tuesday, October 6 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Courses in the humanities and social sciences attract students from a staggering array of disciplines, with equally varied motivations. Some wish to broaden their minds or plump their résumés, others want to explore specific interests not addressed in their home fields, a few seek simply to satisfy requirements. This diversity of academic skill sets and perspectives can be an asset, but instructors also must wrestle with wide disparities in background knowledge. How should we teach students with such diverse intentions, expectations, and starting points? In this workshop, we will discuss teaching strategies and learning objectives in the humanities and social science classroom. What qualities, if any, are unique to this space? What advantages or obstacles might we contend with given our subject matter or disciplinary methods? As a group, we will discuss how we teach writing, reading, note-taking, and critical thinking; how we connect lecture to recitation; and the teaching goals of our particular discipline in both the short- and long-term.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Managing Your Time While Teaching

Dr. Myrna Cohen, Executive Director, Weingarten Learning Resources Center

Wednesday, October 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: How can you balance your own academic goals with your teaching responsibilities? What are the methods for accomplishing short- and long-range tasks while teaching a class or a recitation, holding office hours, and/or grading exams? In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to explore their own time management styles and take away additional strategies for taking control of their time. Additionally, iOS Apps for time and project management will be introduced.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Managing Student Groups in STEM Teaching

Kelsey Speer, CTL Graduate Fellow, Cell and Molecular Biology, Perelman School of Medicine

Tuesday, October 13 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Group-based problem solving is becoming increasingly popular in science classrooms as STEM fields gain interest in promoting student collaboration and individual academic achievement through active learning. The goal of this workshop is to provide TAs with strategies for managing student interactions to make group work more effective. In this workshop, we will use role-plays to examine different group dynamics as well as to guide students in successful group-based problem solving. Physics TAs are particularly encouraged to attend.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Why You Shouldn't Teach What You Learn in Your Graduate Classes

Professor Robert Vitalis, Political Science

Tuesday, October 13 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Osman Balkan, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Location: Stiteler Hall, Silverstein Forum

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Political Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Helping Struggling Students

Mitra Eghbal, CTL Graduate Fellow, Biology

Tuesday, October 13 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Some degree of struggle allows students to learn and experience the intellectual growth essential to their education. In this workshop, we will discuss how to engage in a productive dialogue with students who are struggling. What strategies will help motivate your students to excel, while also creating a classroom where it is safe to make some mistakes? How do you fulfill your role as a supportive & accessible instructor, while simultaneously helping students appreciate that some degree of struggle is essential in college? How and when should you tap into university resources, especially when students seem to have gotten off track? The difficulty of these topics does not detract from the deep satisfaction TAs and instructors can feel when they help a student work through their struggles and succeed. We will also discuss common causes of underperformance and how to effectively respond in these particular scenarios.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Working With Students One-on-One

Tim Sowicz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Thursday, October 15 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Office hours are typically associated with helping struggling students or fending off grade complaints. Additionally, “the worried well” (i.e., students who are doing well, but worry they aren’t) often utilize office hours. Regardless of the reason for students coming to office hours, it is important for TAs to make these designated times as productive as possible. This workshop will provide an opportunity to discuss ways to use office hours to reach students who need them the most and how to take advantage of opportunities for one-on-one work to maximize student learning. Recognizing when students or TAs need additional assistance or services, and when to involve faculty members with the concerns of individual students will also be discussed.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Effective Lecturing

Jake Morton, CTL Graduate Fellow, Ancient History

Tuesday, October 20 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: This workshop addresses what makes for a good lecture and how to develop a lecturing style that works best for you and what you are teaching. Different lecture techniques and tools will be examined as well as tips for planning, pace, and organization. Special attention will be paid to how technology can help or hurt a lecture as well as how to be engaging without crossing the line into mere entertainment. Lecturing is an integral part of being a professor and we’ll discuss how to better use lectures to teach, engage, and inspire students.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching to Different Levels of Students

Jin Woo Jang, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mathematics

Tuesday, October 20 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: In many classes it is common to find students who approach the material or the discipline from dramatically different positions, with regard to experience, comfort and aptitude. This workshop offers various strategies for teaching different levels of students in order to ensure that each class is productive for everyone: how to identify different learning styles; how to modify teaching plans depending on students’ levels of preparation and knowledge; how to incorporate different modes of communication; and how to motivate students.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Integrating Group Work Into Your Class

Kyle Smith, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Wednesday, October 21 | 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Student-centered approaches to learning are powerful methodologies that one can use in any classroom. When used appropriately, group work gives students invaluable experiences working with others and finding their voice. These experiences provide skills that can be used as lifelong tools in any vocation that students may pursue in the future. This workshop will focus on discovering what methods have worked well or may have needed tweaking in past personal experiences while also outlining techniques that one could use to give students the maximum benefit of group work.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Dealing with the Reality of Your Dream Class

Bronwyn Wallace, doctoral candidate and Lecturer, English

Thursday, October 22 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dianne Mitchell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett 330

Summary: We all began the semester with a dream of what our class would be like. Now, how to deal with the reality? We’ll talk about the importance of setting achievable goals for your course in syllabus design and lesson planning, how and whether to differentiate your intellectual interests from the work of instructing undergrads, and even some ways of coping with the feeling of having an unsuccessful class – something that happens to us all.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Helping Students Approach Learning in STEM Fields

Naomi Fitter, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Monday, October 26 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: TAs and instructors in STEM fields face a variety of different challenges. Students come from a wide range of backgrounds and with a range of expectations of what STEM classes will be like. This workshop will ask: What different ways can we help students develop the skills they need to solve problems in our fields? How can we inspire students to thrive and stay in STEM disciplines? To answer these questions, we will discuss ways to leverage different teaching tools and techniques to reach the heterogeneous population of learners and help students succeed in STEM learning.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Sensitive Topics

Osman Balkan, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Tuesday, October 27 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: The classroom is a place where students and instructors confront different ideas and beliefs about the world. A diversity of viewpoints can provide a strong foundation for classroom discussion by encouraging participants to reflect upon and engage with opinions that are contrary to their own. While the intellectual discomfort that such reflection can instigate is a hallmark of the learning process, that discomfort can also impede learning and critical inquiry. This workshop will cover strategies for leading discussions on politically sensitive and/or controversial topics. We will consider different approaches to building inclusive classrooms, managing “hot” moments, and setting ground rules for respectful debate.
All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Guiding Students in Writing Papers

Katie Clonan-Roy, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education

Wednesday, October 28 | 11:30 am - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 305

Summary: Strong writing skills are a key capability that college students need to develop in order to succeed in a variety of career fields upon graduation. In this workshop, we will examine how to guide students in writing papers, and will focus on developing arguments and conceptual frameworks. This workshop will concentrate on writing research papers (including critical literature reviews) and shorter reaction papers based on course readings. The workshop will focus on pedagogical and revision strategies that instructors can use to improve student writing and argument development and to support them through the writing process.

All graduate students are welcome. Counts towards CTL Teaching Certificate.

Grading and Giving Feedback on Written Work

Professor Therese Richmond, Nursing

Thursday, October 29 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tim Sowicz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin 215

Summary: Disputes about grades for assignments pose a particular challenge for students and educators. This workshop will address ways of providing constructive critique on course assignments so that students and educators feel satisfied. Methods for grading written work, navigating disagreements about grades, and reconciling grading among several evaluators will also be addressed.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Beyond the Canon

Professor J.C. Cloutier, English

Monday, November 9 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dianne Mitchell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett 330

Summary: Have you ever wanted to incorporate a more diverse range of materials into your classroom? How do we use our training as readers and teachers of novels, plays, and poems to introduce students to other kinds of texts that excite us? In this workshop, we?ll talk about how to teach archival sources, comic books, and other materials that don’t appear in scholarly editions. Can we teach these materials as “literature”? Should we?
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Sensitive Subjects in the Classroom

Professor Marilyn Sommers, Nursing

Tuesday, November 10 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tim Sowicz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: Fagin 435

Summary: Students and educators bring their lived experiences to the classroom, and discussions of sensitive topics can elicit strong feelings among participants. This workshop will address ways to present and discuss sensitive topics, ensure that the perspectives of all involved are heard and considered, and strategies for maintaining respect and civility among persons with discordant perspectives and opinions.
All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Nursing and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.