Events



Active Learning in STEM Courses

Kyle Smith, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Monday, February 8 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: Active learning practices when properly implemented can be invaluable tools in a STEM classroom. What constitutes active learning and what are the key considerations in designing such exercises? In this workshop we will examine a variety of materials generated in active learning courses (across multiple disciplines) at Penn and other universities so as to equip attendees with a toolbox for designing such experiences for their own students.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Through Questions

Professor Stanton Wortham, Education

Monday, February 8 | 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Katie Clonan-Roy, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education

Location: GSE 400

Summary: How do we engage students with the complex, changing ideas at both the core and the edge of many fields, helping them move beyond preexisting ideas and explore competing accounts and evidence? One approach is to teach through questions—to structure some of my courses around a series of contestable issues that foster sustained dialogue. In this workshop, Stanton Wortham will discuss how he teaches through questions, poses questions that have more than one plausible answer, and engages students in conversations that explore the alternatives and supporting evidence. All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Education department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

The Evolving Educator: How Teaching Changes (or doesn't) Over The Years

Professor Mary Ersek, Biobehavioral and Health Sciences

Tuesday, February 9 | 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Tim Sowicz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Location: SON room 229L

Summary: Are exceptional teachers born or made? The answer may be both, but the focus of this workshop is to explore how educators’ teaching philosophies and techniques change over the course of their careers. Additionally, strategies for self-evaluation of teaching will be discussed, as well as formal methods for considering the impact of one’s teaching as it relates to tenure and promotion within the university setting. All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Nursing department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Assignments

Professor Chi-Ming Yang, English

Thursday, February 11 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dianne Mitchell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher-Bennett 330

Summary: Are there methods other than a standard essay prompt to get students to demonstrate their understanding of course material? Spoiler alert: you bet. Professor Chi-ming Yang will tell us about some of her favorite assignments and why they work. All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Students to Look at Data Critically

Mitra Eghbal, CTL Graduate Fellow, Biology

Thursday, February 11 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: Teaching data analysis is highly gratifying, in part because data analysis (similar to the skill of teaching) is transferable across many disciplines. Participants will discuss to how help students organize data to facilitate comprehension, how to train students to notice fallacies in data interpretation, and how to teach students to cross-examine themselves so they can be independent users of data. We will address both student-generated data and teacher-supplied data. Each participant will decide how to help students assemble a ‘toolkit’ for dissecting data specific to his or her field. (Depending on your field, this toolkit may include anything from textbooks, manuscripts, labmethods, programming languages, or statistical reasoning.) This workshop will be of interest to anyone in a data-driven field, particularly STEM and the social sciences.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Joining engineering design, creativity, and art

Professor Mark Yim, Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics

Thursday, February 18 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Naomi Fitter, CTL Graduate Fellow, MEAM

Location: Greenberg Lounge (Skirkanich Hall, room 114)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Language Classes As An Adjunct, Visiting Assistant Professor, or Post-Doc

Dr. Patrick Glauthier, Classical Studies

Friday, February 19 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jacob Morton, CTL Graduate Fellow, Ancient History

Location: Classics Lounge, Cohen 251

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Ancient History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Engaging Our Newest Undergraduates With Evidence-Based Science

Professor Gregory Guild, Biology

Tuesday, February 23 | 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Mitra Eghbal, CTL Graduate Fellow, Biology

Location: Goddard 102

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Biology department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Incorporating active learning into your recitation or laboratory

Dr. Susan Phillips, Chemistry

Tuesday, February 23 | 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Kyle Smith, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: Vagelos 2000

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry Department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

NEW DATE: Mental Health In The Classroom: Supporting Students With Stress and Mental Health Issues To Promote Learning and Wellness

Katie Clonan-Roy, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education and Representative from CAPS

Wednesday, February 24 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: In this workshop, we will explore intersections of stress, mental illness, and learning in the university classroom. We will discuss how stress impacts learning, differences and overlaps between healthy, normal stress, distress, and mental illness, and possible signs that indicate that a student is struggling in your classroom. Workshop attendees will leave with ideas and strategies for how to help students who are navigating through intense periods of stress, how to connect students to resources on campus, like Counseling and Psychological Services, and how to promote a culture of wellness in your classroom. Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching With Visuals

Kristian Taketomo, CTL Graduate Fellow, History

Thursday, February 25 | 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: What are “visuals”? Are they images or artwork, like prints, paintings, or photographs? What about representations of data or information, such as charts, graphs, or diagrams? What about writing? Can text be a “visual”? In this workshop, we will consider a range of icons and objects we might call “visuals” and how we use them in the classroom. We will discuss how we can prepare students to work with visuals and, subsequently, how we can assess them. Finally, we will clarify which skills and vocabularies we, as instructors, are trying to teach when we ask students to examine (or “read”) images. As this workshop employs an expansive definition of “visual,” we encourage graduate students from any and all disciplines to attend.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

How to Effectively Design Assignments and Provide Feedback

Professor Alex Weisiger, Political Science

Tuesday, March 1 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Osman Balkan, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Location: Stiteler Hall, Silverstein Forum

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Political Science department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Creating an Inclusive Classroom

Osman Balkan, CTL Graduate Fellow, Political Science

Wednesday, March 2 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 2nd floor conference room

Summary: An inclusive classroom is one in which participants work together to ensure that their ideas are equally valued and respected. It is a space where students engage with the experiences and perspectives of a wide range of groups and reflect on the ways in which their own positionality informs how they construct knowledge in a given subject or discipline. This workshop will cover a variety of teaching methods and strategies aimed at establishing inclusive learning environments. We will discuss topics such as creating a sense of community, ensuring respectful communication, managing classroom dynamics, and fostering awareness about diversity and difference.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Beyond Graduate School: Preparing For Your First Year of Teaching

Nick Blackwell, Post Doctoral Teaching Fellow in History, North Carolina State University

Friday, March 4 | 12:15 pm - 1:45 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Jacob Morton, CTL Graduate Fellow, Ancient History

Location: Cohen 251

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the History department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Scaffolding Research Projects

Kelsey Speer, CTL Graduate Fellow, Cell & Molecular Biology

Wednesday, March 16 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: Research projects can be a great way to teach students valuable analytical and writing skills. However, when teaching skills instead of facts, how do you ensure that students experience growth? In this workshop, we will discuss ways to use instructional supports, or “scaffolding,” to break large assignments into smaller, more targeted, goal-oriented tasks. These tasks allow students to practice the skills they will need to successfully complete the larger project as well as help the instructor to monitor students’ learning. The workshop will present examples gleaned from a variety of fields and help participants apply scaffolding to their own teaching contexts.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Relationships Between K-12 and University Teaching: How K-12 Teaching Can Be Used To Improve Teaching In Higher Education

Professor Janine Remillard, Education

Thursday, March 17 | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Katie Clonan-Roy, CTL Graduate Fellow, Education

Location: GSE 124

Summary: All faculty members in higher education have experience with K-12 instruction, mostly as students, some as teachers as well. This seminar explores similarities and differences between these two teaching contexts and considers ways that research on K-12 teaching can be used to inform and improve teaching in higher education. All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Education department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Harnessing the power of the MOOC

Professor Robert Ghrist, Mathematics & Electrical/Systems Engineering

Thursday, March 17 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Naomi Fitter, CTL Graduate Fellow, MEAM

Location: Greenberg Lounge, Skirkanich 114

Summary: Professor Robert Ghrist was among the first Penn faculty to engage with the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) movement. Come hear about why he decided to design a MOOC, learn about his journey developing a Coursera class, and discover how this MOOC fed back into his teaching at Penn.

Training Students in Critical Reading

Tim Sowicz, CTL Graduate Fellow, Nursing

Thursday, March 17 | 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: Students and educators read for many reasons – for information, pleasure, or to gain new perspectives. Yet another reason to read, particularly as it pertains to course assignments, is to provide a base from which to offer intelligent and thoughtful critique. But what does it mean to read critically? Are there discipline-specific criteria to evaluate students’ ability to read critically and synthesize information from diverse sources? This workshop will explore these questions, as well as others, with the aim of providing teachers with the tools to assist students to glean the most from their reading assignments. This workshop will also address ways that educators can make explicit their expectations for what they want students to gain from assigned readings, and how to choose readings. University-wide resources to assist students with understanding the mechanics of critical reading will also be explored. Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Using Film As A Teaching Tool

Mayhar Entezari, Persian Language Program Coordinator and Lecturer, NELC

Friday, March 18 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Raha Rafii, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages & CIvilizations

Location: Williams Hall room 844

Summary: How can you incorporate film into your class that goes beyond showing video clips? How can we rethink the relationship between video productions and both the sciences and humanities? This workshop will discuss the various ways in which teachers can deepen the analytical skills of their students with and through film. All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Lunch will be provided.

Taking Students Outside the Classroom: Museums, Tours & Other Opportunities

Jake Morton, CTL Graduate Fellow, Ancient History

Monday, March 21 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: How can instructors in diverse disciplines take advantage of opportunities to teach students outside of the classroom? This workshop addresses effective ways to move the learning environment off campus (or elsewhere on campus) and how to choose and incorporate activities that will work best for you and what you are teaching. We will examine different techniques and tools to help with organizing and implementing these teaching activities as well as tips for teaching “on-site”. Potential uses of Philadelphia’s museums, architecture, topography, and open spaces will be discussed, as a means to teach, engage and inspire students. Both short field trips and longer study abroad style excursions will be considered, with examples drawn from the humanities, social sciences and STEM fields.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Mentoring Undergraduate Students

Professor William Dailey, Chemistry, and Professor Christopher Graves, Chemistry, Albright College

Monday, March 21 | 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Kyle Smith, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: Vagelos 2000

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching About 'the Other'

Raha Rafii, CTL Graduate Fellow, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Thursday, March 24 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: This workshop will guide participants to identify how their fields have set out certain works or histories as “other” and how to use their teaching to consider alternatives to disciplinary norms. Many disciplines have marginalized voices that disciplinary norms label “other,” and as a result have dismissed ideas, texts and narratives that appear foreign, strange or abnormal. Participants in this workshop will discuss how to re-frame “the other” as a valued subject of inquiry and how to incorporate issues, subjects and perspectives that have been traditionally marginalized in ways that encourage critical thinking and engage a wide range of students. Finally participants will consider ways that teachers may inadvertently reinforce “othering” and how to avoid these pitfalls in designing lessons plans and syllabi.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching 'The Other'

Professor Jo Park, English

Wednesday, March 30 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Dianne Mitchell, CTL Graduate Fellow, English

Location: Fisher Bennett Faculty Lounge, room 135

Summary: How do we teach material that features authors and characters who are “other”: of a different race, religion, gender identity, etc than many of the figures who once formed the literary canon? Do students recognize them as “other” in the same was we do – as instructors who may have had to fight to propose particular courses? How do we deal productively with student assumptions about the material? And does devising courses primarily about “the other” sequester them in a harmful or a valuable way? We’ll tackle all these questions and more. All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the English department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Creating Effective Multiple Choice Exams

Jin Woo Jang, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mathematics

Wednesday, March 30 | 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: In many classes multiple choice exams can be efficient way to evaluate student learning. At the same time, however, it can be difficult and time-consuming to create effective multiple choice questions. This workshop offers various examples and strategies for writing effective multiple choice exams, considering such issues as: how to state a definite question/problem; how to write effective distractors; and how to assess higher level thinking via multiple choice questions.

Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Promoting engineering diversity

Professor Paulo Arratia, Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics

Tuesday, April 5 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Naomi Fitter, CTL Graduate Fellow, MEAM

Location: Greenberg Lounge (Skirkanich Hall, room 114)

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the School of Engineering and Applied Science and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Designing Creative Assignments in STEM Classes

Naomi Fitter, CTL Graduate Fellow, Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Thursday, April 7 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Location: Graduate Student Center 205

Summary: Since a primary focus of STEM education is to give students the tools they need to independently solve complex problems, well-written course assignments are crucial to STEM curricula. Despite this clear need, creating problems that motivate and engage students can also be a challenge. One possible solution is using creative, open-ended assignments in your course design. How can you connect teaching goals to available resources in a creative way? What types of creative assignments already exist? How do students respond to these assignments? In this workshop, we will discuss experiences and examples of creative assignments in STEM as a springboard towards designing our own creative and meaningful assignments.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Navigating the Job Market and Teaching Your First Course

Professor Neil Tomson, Chemistry

Thursday, April 7 | 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Kyle Smith, CTL Graduate Fellow, Chemistry

Location: Vagelos 2000

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Chemistry department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

Teaching Theory

Professors Jeffrey Green, Political Science and David Kazanjian, English

Tuesday, April 12 | 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Osman Balkan, CTl Graduate Fellow, Political Science and Alison Howard, Comparative Literature

Location: Stiteler Hall, Silverstein Forum

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Political Science and English departments and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.

How To Prepare And Deliver A Great Lecture

Professor May Mullins, Cell & Developmental Biology

Thursday, May 5 | 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Graduate Student Workshops

Convener: Kelsey Speer, CTL Graduate Fellow, Cell & Molecular Biology

Location: BRB 1201

Summary: All graduate students are welcome. This event grows out of concerns in the Cell & Molecular Biology department and so may be most useful to students in related fields.
Counts toward the CTL Teaching Certificate.