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CRIMINOLOGY Now on Trial: Justice in Smart Vs. Dumb In the American criminal-justice system, the figure of Justicia is usually depicted wearing a blindfold. While that may symbolize an admirable impartiality, says Dr. Lawrence Sherman, it may also indicate an unwillingness to learn—and to take into account human emotions: of victims, of criminal-justice officials, and of criminals. Continued...


Illustration by William Sulit

APPOINTMENTS New Dental Dean Appointed As the Gazette was going to press last month, we learned that Dr. Marjorie K. Jeffcoat, assistant dean of research and professor and chair of the periodontics department at the University of Alabama School of Dentistry, has been appointed dean of the School of Dental Medicine. She will assume her new position at Penn this summer, replacing Dr. Raymond Fonseca, who has led the school for the past 15 years. Continued...

GIFTS REVISITED Penn and Health Care Trust
Dissolve Agreement
Last March, the University
and the Philadelphia Health Care Trust (PHCT) announced an agreement to transfer the trust’s assets to Penn Medicine, the governing body of the University’s Health System, by 2009 [“Gazetteer,” May/June]. Given that those assets were then estimated to be worth about $100 million, it seemed quite a coup for Penn. Continued...

SYMPOSIUM Where the Wild Things Were “What’s wrong with this picture?” asks Dr. Ross MacPhee, pointing to a projected image. It’s an Ice Age scene, depicting several hunters chucking spears at monstrous woolly mammoths in the middle of a blizzard—like something out of an old issue of Boy’s Life. A rumble of laughter rolls through the University Museum’s Harrison Auditorium. MacPhee, curator of vertebrate zoology at the American Museum of Natural History, has made his point: As with The Flintstones, the entertaining but historically flawed cartoon, much of the hunting illustration is simply preposterous. Continued...

LIFELONG LEARNING Emeritus Professor, Emerging Painter There is a telling parenthetical description on Dr. Rosemary Stevens’ University letterhead. Right after her title—Stanley I. Sheerr Endowed Term Professor in Arts and Sciences, Emeritus —is a single word: (Active). Continued...

FACULTY AND THE LAW Court Orders Penn to Pay Up The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ordered the University to pay $2.9 million to Dr. Jorge Ferrer, professor of microbiology and director of clinical studies at the School of Veterinary Medicine, for violating his employment contract and destroying his cancer-research program. Continued...

ARCHAEOLOGY The Magic of Birth and Bricks Sometime in the 18th century B.C., in the southern Egyptian town of Abydos, a young mother in her final agony of labor cries out to the cow-headed goddess whose image hangs on a pole beside her: Come to me, O Hathor, at my moment of trial! And as her new baby squeezes out of her body and into the light, the mother herself becomes one with the goddess. Or so it was believed. Continued...


Previous issue's Gazetteer | Mar/Apr Contents | Gazette home

2003 The Pennsylvania Gazette Last modified 02/28/03

BRICKS AND MORTAR

A New Home for Early American Studies

The McNeil Center for Early American Studies will get a new home in a new building, to be located on the east side of 34th Street, between Hill Field and Walnut Street. The building will be funded by a $6 million gift by the Barra Foundation and Robert L. McNeil Jr., the foundation’s chairman.

“This financial support will provide us with a fabulous facility,” said Dr. Daniel K. Richter, the professor of history who serves as the center’s director. “For many years to come, we will be able to serve the academic community interested in the early American period and to expand our role as the nation’s premier incubator of young scholars doing innovative research on the people of early America.”

The McNeil Center was founded in 1978 by Dr. Richard S. Dunn, emeritus professor of American history. It specializes in the histories and cultures of North America before 1850, with an emphasis on the mid-Atlantic region and on promoting the scholarly use of the Philadelphia area’s rich research collections. It offers pre- and post-doctoral fellowships, a seminar series, and national symposia on specialized topics. The center has also teamed up with the University of Pennsylvania Press to publish a book series and Early American Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, the first issue of which will appear this spring.

Noting that the center has provided an “important interdisciplinary venue to highlight the critical role the study of our nation’s past plays in understanding and shaping our future,” Penn President Judith Rodin CW’66 said that the “generous funding” by the Barra Foundation and McNeil “recognizes [Penn’s] role as a national leader in research and scholarship on early American studies.”