MAR|APR 2006

1910

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Faculty & Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1924

Joseph G. Louderback Jr. WEv’24, Franklin, Tenn., Jan. 6, 2005.

1927

W. Lewis Mengel WEF’27, Reading, Pa., Aug. 7, 2002.

1928

Mary McLean Fulton Ed’28 G’31, Monroe, N.J., whose career in education for the Philadelphia school system spanned 35 years; Sept. 18. She was a former president of the local Panhellenic Group and Interfaith Council.

1930

M. Donaldson Henderer W’30, Wilmington, Del., Nov. 23, 2004.

1931

Grace A. Yocom Ed’31 PSW’44, Philadelphia, a career social worker for Traveler’s Aid Society of Philadelphia; Sept. 4.

1933

Alexander M. Freund C’33, Wyncote, Pa., Sept. 13.

Hon. Norma B. Handloff B’33, Marshfield Hills, Mass., Nov. 20, 2003.

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1934

David Cohen Ed’34 L’37, Philadelphia, a longtime Philadelphia City Council member and liberal activist; Oct. 3. He began his career as a New Deal lawyer. In 1954 he became a Democratic committeeman. In 1966, when he ran for Democratic ward leader against the Democratic organization in the newly reconstituted 17th Ward, the Democratic city committee refused to seat him. He sued and won a second election, and was seated. The following year he ran for the Eighth Council District; although he was opposed by the organization, he again won. Once on the Council he tangled frequently with then police commissioner Frank Rizzo, often on the issue of police brutality. He resigned his seat in 1971 to challenge Rizzo for the Democratic mayoral nomination, dropping out of the race a few days before the primary election. He was reelected to Council in 1979, where he served as chair of the rules committee, which controlled legislation connected with development and zoning, until 1992, following a falling-out with then Council president John Street. During the early 1990s he attacked city service budget cuts imposed by then-Mayor Edward G. Rendell C’65 Hon’00 and Street as “disgraceful” and “shameful.” “He was our conscience,” said U.S. Representative and Democratic party chair Bob Brady. “David fought for people who couldn’t fight for themselves.” During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps in New Guinea and the Philippines. His wife is Florence H. Cohen GEd’65. His sons are Hon. Mark B. Cohen C’70 and Hon. Denis P. Cohen C’73, and one of his daughters is Sherrie J. Cohen CW’75.

Edward Jacobs W’34, Malvern, Pa., the retired owner of Jacobs Consulting, a direct mail firm; Aug. 2. At Penn he was president of the Jewish Students Association and was a member of several Zionist associations. He began his career at Jacobs, Grossman & Rosenberg, a Philadelphia manufacturer of Mitzi Frocks and Voila Dresses for young girls. He eventually became vice president of the company, until its closing in 1964. He was then vice president of Woodington Mail Advertising Service until retiring in 1994, after which he operated a direct mail consulting firm until 1996. He was past president of the Philadelphia Waist and Dress Manufacturers Association and past chair of the International Convention of Mail Advertising Association. Active in Jewish educational organizations, he was past chair of the board of Gratz College; served as vice president of Akiba Hebrew Academy; and was treasurer of the United Synagogue Commission on Jewish Education. At Har Zion Temple in Penn Valley, where he was a member for 77 years, he headed several committees.

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1936

Bernard B. Rothschild Ar’36, Atlanta, a retired architect; Sept. 16. His son is Robert H. Rothschild C’69.

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1937

Charlotte Oswald Kulp CW’37, Lancaster, Pa., Sept. 6. She had worked in her father’s Philadelphia advertising agency. And she was active for many years in Emergency Aid of Pennsylvania.

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1938

Dr. Carlos M. Gutiérrez C’38 M’41, San José, Costa Rica, the retired chief surgeon of oncology of Hospital San Juan de Dios; June 14. At Penn he was a member of Nu Sigma Nu fraternity. Following his retirement he was appointed ambassador to the United Kingdom; he also represented Costa Rica in the Scandinavian countries. Dr. Gutiérrez was Caballero de Gracia Magistral in the Order of Malta. “He was a distinguished and resourceful humanist when it came to helping his fellow human beings,” said his son, Dr. Jaime A. Gutiérrez-Victory C’75.

Dr. Murray L. Knopf D’38, Mount Kisco, N.Y., a retired dentist; April 19, 2005.

1939 Harry F. Weber Jr. W’38, New London, N.H., a vice president of A.G. Becker and Company, a Wall Street investment firm, from 1956 until his retirement in 1970; Feb. 6, 2005. Active in local school politics, he served as chair of the board of education for School District 7, 1963-66, and was a board member of New York’s Cooperative Educational Services. Following his retirement he moved to Montserrat, British West Indies, and New London, N.H. In Montserrat he was instrumental in the development of the Montserrat Building Society, which provided low-interest home loans to citizens. He also volunteered with the International Executive Service Corps, where he helped create stock exchanges in Morocco and South Korea and promoted business in Nigeria and El Salvador. In New London he participated in the Service Corps of Retired Executives, where he assisted local businesses. He was a longstanding trustee at the New London and Concord Hospitals; in 1996 he received the New Hampshire Hospital Association’s Outstanding Trustee of the Year Award. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy; he was an intelligence officer on the flagship U.S.S. Ancon during the D-Day Invasion.

Howard J. Fine W’39, Chestnut Hill, Mass., president of the M. H. Fine Co., Boston, until his retirement in 1987; Feb. 10, 2005. He then worked for Smith Barney Financial Group until 1990. At Penn he was a member of Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity, the lightweight crew, and the 150-pound football team. He remained an active alumnus and University supporter. During World War II he served as an ensign in the U.S. Navy.

Kernan M. Kaufman CW’39, Easton, Md., March 2, 2005.

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1940

Alan Bookman PSW’40, Media, Pa., Aug. 13.

Helen Klimesh Dornbush OT’40, Ann Arbor, Mich., Oct. 7, 2004.

Carl J.W. Hessinger L’40, Allentown, Pa., an attorney and the retired president of H&H Concessions; Aug. 25. While at Penn he received the Pennsylvania Senatorial Scholarship Award and was a member of Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. He was the first paid associate in Butz, Stechel and Rupp, the law firm of then-Pennsylvania state Senator George Rupp. He established his own practice in 1948. Partnered with his brothers Tom and John, and a friend, Roy Minninger, he created H&M Concessions Inc., which operated concessions throughout the Lehigh Valley. The firm funded the expansion of the Allentown Farmers Market and assisted in the management of the Great Allentown Fair, among other local ventures. A cigar aficionado, he and his partners also owned a number of smoke shops in Allentown. In 1962, in response to the buildup of tensions in Cuba, he purchased futures in Cuban cigars, primarily from Dunhill, N.Y. After the embargo he became one of the largest owners of pre-Castro Cuban cigars in the United States. He sold a portion of his collection at auctions in the 1970s and ‘80s. Appointed a lifetime trustee of Trexler Trust of Allentown in 1963, he was the longest serving board member, becoming emeritus in 2001. He was counsel to the Harry Clay Trexler Trust and Foundation, 1963-1995. In 1947 he was president of Allen Title Company, the first such organization in Allentown.

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1941

John E. Boyd W’41 L’46, West Chester, Pa., the retired president of International Realty Investors in Norristown, Pa.; June 1, 2001.

John W. Crossin WEv’41, Philadelphia, March 3, 2003.

Richard D. Heilbron EE’41, Lancaster, Pa., the owner of S&L Heilbron and Sons; April 17, 2005.

Robert H. Katz W’41, New York, the president of Ira G. Katz Inc.; Aug. 28.

William E. Marbaker II W’41, Schaumburg, Ill., a former secretary for the Mining Industry Council; Sept. 10.

Frederick Muller Jr. WEv’41, Lansdale, Pa., vice president and corporate secretary of the former Quaker Lace Company in Philadelphia, until his retirement in 1992; Feb. 19, 2005. He had worked for the company for 43 years. He was a former, longtime member of Immanuel Lutheran Church in Philadelphia, where he served many terms as president of the church council. During World War II he served with the U.S. Army for two years in the Pacific and one year in Europe, the latter as an adjutant of the 133rd Evacuation Hospital. He was the recipient of the Asiatic and Pacific Ribbon with two stars and the European Ribbon with one star.

William J. Scarlett L’41, Kennett Square, Pa., a founding partner of the law firm that is now Larmore, Scarlett, Myers and Temple; Sept. 25. He retired from active practice in 1975 and was of counsel to the firm until his death. He was a past president of the Chester County Bar Association and a longtime board member of the National Bank & Trust Company of Kennett Square. Active in many civic and charitable organizations, he was a co-founder of the Kennett Community Chest. And he was a co-founder and director of the Red Clay Valley Association. He chaired the Chester County Planning Commission in 1960.

Dr. Sidney I. Slavin C’41, Utica, N.Y., Nov. 22, 2001.

Paul A. Tomlin W’41, Sewell, N.J., June 29, 2003.

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1943

Hon. Melvin G. Levy Ed’43 L’50, Wallingford, Pa., a retired judge; Sept. 12. His Penn family members include his brother, Arthur Levy W’52 L’55, and his sister-in-law, Barbara Binder Levy Ed’55. His step-daughter is Lori M. Abate Nu’87.

Richard D. Tober W’43, Hollywood, Fla., June 19.

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1944

Bernard A. Lichtman W’44, Boca Raton, Fla., Feb. 23, 2005.

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1946

Lura Virginia Aten NTS’46, Defiance, Ohio, a retired nurse and teacher; March 21, 2005.

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1947

Robert J. Acheson W’47, Jamesburg, N.J., Aug. 4.

back to topWilliam W. Wylie W’47, West Chester, Pa., a retired accountant and former supervisor for Birmingham; Aug. 25. He was a controller for Schramm Inc., a manufacturer of engines and air compressors, for 37 years. He then joined the staff of Butts Ticket Co. in Cochranville, where he remained until his retirement in 2001. He served on the Birmingham Township Planning Commission for 15 years and was president of the Birmingham-Lafayette Cemetery Association. He was appointed to the town’s board of supervisors in 1987, a post he held until 1994.

1948

Jerome E. Caplan W’48, West Hartford, Conn., April 14, 2005.

Dr. Harriet Josephine Davis GM’48, Newtown, Pa., a retired physician; March 19, 2002.

John W. Drayton WG’48, Bryn Mawr, Pa., Sept. 24.

Francis Roy Haley WEv’48, Saint Petersburg, Fla., Sept. 17. He had worked for the Budd Company in Philadelphia and Michigan. And he was a veteran of World War II.

Annunciata Lepore Ed’48, West Pittston, Pa., Aug. 29.

Bart J. Rowley Jr. C’48, Lansdowne, Pa., Sept. 29.

back to topRobert S. Zarger W’48, Mine Hill, N.J., Sept. 11, 2004.

1949

James W. Gray W’49, Tampa, Fla., Aug. 3.

Dr. Harry F. Zinsser Jr. GM’49, Bryn Mawr, Pa., emeritus professor of medicine at the School of Medicine and chief of cardiology and chair of medicine at Graduate Hospital; Aug. 30. Before coming to Penn he taught at the University of Pittsburgh Medical School, 1946-47. He was a faculty member at the University’s School of Medicine from 1947 until his retirement in 1982. He was also professor of cardiology and served as chief of cardiology at Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Zinsser performed the first heart catheterization at Penn. He designed and donated the first catheterization laboratories at both Graduate Hospital and Presbyterian Hospital. He was an officer and board member of numerous medical and professional organizations. Philadelphia magazine named him annually as the cardiologist that doctors would consult first. During World War II he served in the Pacific as a member of the U.S. Army’s 27th General Hospital. Promoted to Major, he was part of the Surgeon General’s office, where he visited and inspected medical bases during the final months of the war in preparation for the invasion of Japan. After the surrender he was assigned to General Douglas MacArthur’s Surgeon General’s staff in Tokyo. Back in the States, he became chief of medicine at the Army’s 361st General Hospital and later deputy commander and then acting commander of the 31st Hospital Center in Philadelphia. He was a member of the special medical group at the Pensacola Naval Base and Cape Canaveral that examined the cardiovascular effects of space flight. Two of his sons are Dr. Michael H. Zinsser M’73 and Daniel F. Zinsser WG’75; his daughter is Sally Ann Zinsser Nu’76.

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1950

Marshall M. Kloda WEv’50, Philadelphia, Sept. 14.

Morton D. Waldbaum W’50, Wynnewood, Pa., Sept. 11.

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1951

Marleen Maxwell Burt DH’51, Forked River, N.J., a retired dental hygienist; April 2005.

Robert H. Cody WEv’51, Philadelphia, Oct. 14, 2004.

Dr. W. Richard Gilliam M’51, West Columbia, S.C., a retired physician; August 2004.

Dr. Loretta Esposito Scuderi Ed’51 GEd’63 GrEd’77, Glen Mills, Pa., a longtime educator and administrator in the Philadelphia school system, until her retirement in 1992; Sept. 29. She began her career as a teacher in Sharswood Elementary School in South Philadelphia. She was principal of Powell and Harrington Elementary Schools and designed the district’s math curriculum before being named superintendent of District 3 in 1974. She was superintendent of Districts 7 and 8 before retiring. “Loretta was extraordinarily gracious, kind, and compassionate,” said Connie Clayton, former superintendent of the Philadelphia school district. “She had high expectations for herself and others….Her final outcome was always what was best for students.” Dr. Scuderi wrote math books, produced a television series on math, and lectured at several universities. She received numerous honors, including being named Woman of the Year in 1975 by the Sons of Italy. She was president of the Education Alumni Association at the University’s graduate school of education. And she had served on the Garnet Valley School Board.

Martin A. Stohlman Jr. W’51, Alexandria, Va., Nov. 21, 2003.

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1952

I. Newton Flounders Jr. Ar’52, Phoenix, a retired architect and leading American collector of gay literature; May 18, 2005. Known as “Bud,” he recounted in a 1994 interview that he had discovered gay life while working summer jobs on oil-company tankers during his years at Penn. On moving from California to Phoenix in 1990, he donated 3,000 volumes from his collection to the Stamford University’s Green Library. He went on to donate 5,400 volumes in total over the next 15 years, including a delivery of 14 additional boxes in January. “The Flounders Gay Fiction Collection is one of the largest and most important collections of such books,” said the curator of special collections at Stamford. “It will continue to serve as a vital tool for literary research.” Bud’s unpublished bibliography of the collection, along with documentation of his activities as a collector, are preserved in the archives of the Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Historical Society in San Francisco. He was an active supporter of the Walt Whitman Bookshop, a pioneering gay and lesbian bookstore that operated in San Francisco from 1978 to 1989. He invested in the store, joined the board, and designed and built the bookshelves and other fixtures. As an architect he worked in Philadelphia, Phoenix, and Anchorage, Alaska, before moving to California to join the firm Edward Durrell Stone, and working on the design of the Stanford Medical Center. He was also involved in the development of BART, the Bay Area Rapid Transit System. In addition to his book-collecting, he was active in the old Gay People’s Union at Stanford during the 1970s and 1980s, and helped develop its library. In 1974-7 he volunteered with the Gay Community of Concern, a Stanford social-services agency, the first such gay organization in the country to receive federal funding. During World War II he had served as a technical sergeant in the U.S. Army supply division in North Africa and Italy.

Milton P. King L’52, Philadelphia, a retired attorney; Sept. 22.

Dr. Gerald W. Kronfeld D’52, Chadds Ford, Pa., a retired dentist who had maintained a practice in Wilmington, Del., for over 40 years; Aug. 16.

Dorothy Zielinski Simmons Nu’52, Beaverton, Ore., a retired nurse and teacher who spent 10 years as the occupational health and safety nurse at the former Crocker National Bank in Oregon; Sept. 15.

Wilmer Souder ChE’52, Pottstown, Pa., Sept. 2.

1953

Frank E. Koder W’53, Telford, Pa., 2005.

Leo J. Porter C’53, Philadelphia, Sept. 5.

back to topJohn C. Purinton W’53, Devon, Pa., Sept. 8.

1954

Dr. Harold C. Cox C’54, Hightstown, N.J., an educator, former councilman, and mayor of Hightstown; July 10. As a child he attended Penn football and basketball games with his father. Known as “Skip,” he was social chair of Delta Tau Delta fraternity and became “Willie the Quaker” at Penn football games. He later served as an officer of his class. Dr. Cox was a teacher, guidance counselor, and house master in the East Windsor Regional School District for 36 years, where he also served as director of student and community services. Deeply interested in children, he was a co-founder of Cox Pre-School of Hightstown. First a councilman, he was mayor of Hightstown from 1979 to 1982. Robert Patten, the current mayor, described him as “Mr. Hightstown,” saying “he was the model for caring about your town and being proud of it.” A past president of the Hightstown Historical Society, he most recently served as the announcer for the borough’s Memorial Day parade last May. The Jaycees honored him as Outstanding Young Man in 1966. He received the LeRoy Pullen Award in 1993 and the Mayor’s Shining Star Award in 1998. A past elder of the Presbyterian Church, he was a deacon in the Baptist Church, both in Hightstown. He was a Korean War veteran.

Robert B. Kelley Jr. WEv’54, Wilmington, Del., Sept. 4. He had worked in the credit department of Hercules for many years, until his retirement in 1982. Active in civic and community organizations, he served as a trustee and president of the Delaware Foundation for Retarded Children and was instrumental in developing the All-Star football game held for its benefit. During World War II he served with the U.S. Navy in the South Pacific.

Betty R. Eaton Koechling DH’54, Cambridge, Ohio, Aug. 1.

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1956

Dorothy A. Morris CW’56, Philadelphia, March 31, 2005.

Stuart N. Sosler C’56, Coconut Grove, Fla., president of the Sosler Group; Sept. 17, 2004.

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1958

Dr. Wiley V. Behler V’58, Malvern, Pa., the owner and operator of the Malvern Veterinary Hospital for 38 years; July 4. He began his career working with Malvern veterinarian Thomas Gasser and later took over the practice, working alone for many years. He changed the name to Malvern Veterinary Hospital, and added several associates. He chaired the Pennsylvania State Veterinary Association in 1970. Dr. Behler was an officer of the Great Valley Schools PTA and coached Little League baseball for girls and boys. He was a longtime member of the Malvern parade committee and inspired the annual cakewalk. He was a eucharistic minister for St. Patrick’s Church, where he headed a building-fund committees. And he was a volunteer for Mother Theresa’s soup kitchen and the Missionary Sisters of Charity shelter in Norristown. He had served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army at Fort Bliss, Tex., where he inspected meatpacking plants and other businesses that provided food staples for the troops.

Stanley H. Murray W’58, Greenwich, Conn., a syndicated travel journalist who focused on premier hotels and resorts; Aug. 31. At Penn he was a member of the football and hockey teams and achieved honors in speed skating. He began his career at The Herald Tribune, where he became the youngest circulation director in its history. He then worked for Look magazine before opening his own ad agency. He and his wife, Nancy, began their travel writing in the 1980s; after her death he continued to write travel features. He was a travel editor of several publications and wrote books about the Caribbean and Europe. Active in numerous community and civic organizations, he was a volunteer member of the Port Chester Fire Department for over 40 years. And he was an accomplished woodcarver who specialized in hand-carved whales.

1959

Doris Jean Blessing Nu’59, Camp Hill, Pa., Sept. 6.

Harold J. Mitchell WEv’59, Norristown, Pa., May 31.

William Miehle GEE’59, Havertown, Pa., Dec. 1, 2003.

Richard L. Taylor WEv’59, Blackwood, N.J., September 1.

back to topEldera J. Vordenbaum SW’59, Kerrville, Tex., Dec. 29, 2002.

1960

Rev. Stephen A. Garber G’60, Philadelphia, a chemistry teacher at St. Joseph’s Preparatory School for 42 years, until his retirement in 2002; July 18. Before joining the faculty there in 1960, he had taught chemistry for three years at Gonzaga College High School in Washington and was an instructor and acting chair of the chemistry department at St. Joseph’s University. “He was a master teacher and really engaged the students,” said Father Frank Skechus, a teacher at St. Joe’s Prep. “If a boy forgot his lunch, he saw he got something to eat, and if he had a family problem at home, he would get him help.” When Father Garber arrived at the school, the laboratories were poorly equipped. As head of the chemistry department, he made it a priority to raise money for new equipment, which he installed himself on weekends. After a fire heavily damaged the school in the 1960s, he salvaged the science lockers and had them refurbished for installation in the new school. He received several research grants during his career, including one from the American Heart Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania. He helped develop the SAT test for chemistry and, during summers, taught teachers how to prepare students for the SATs. He served on high school accreditation committees for the Middle States Association’s commission on secondary schools. “I wanted my students to have experience with real research,” he said in a 1969 interview, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. “From research, frequently the path to a science career is a short one.”

back to topCapt. Milton M. Finkelstein EE’60, Brookeville, Md., a retired naval captain; Feb. 14, 2005.

1961

Hon. Burton S. Kolko W’61, Takoma Park, Md., an administrative law judge with more than 40 years of service; Sept. 15. He began his career as an attorney at the Civil Aeronautics Board in 1964. He was promoted to administrative law judge, a position he held at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the National Labor Relations Board. He spent the last 15 years at the U.S. Department of Transportation in Washington, deciding his last major case—a high-profile dispute in which American air cargo companies sought to ban foreign-owned competition from U.S. skies—in January 2005. Other of his noteworthy cases included the landing rights of small aircraft owners and fledgling airlines. He was known in legal circles for the Rochester Red Wings baseball he used as a gavel and the cowboy boots he wore with his robe. A movie buff, he often incorporated quotations from films (such as Raiders of the Lost Ark and Guys and Dolls) in his legal decisions. He was also an accomplished horseman and rode weekly at Equestrian Enterprises, carrying oxygen tanks in his saddle bags after he became ill. His sons are David J. Kolko W’90 and Joshua H. Kolko C’92; their mother is Naomi Greenwood CW’62. Mark W. Kolko W’61 is his cousin.

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1962

Madlyne Altshuler MacDonald CW’62, Sacramento, Calif., an attorney, teacher, and civic activist; July 25. She had worked as a publicist for CBS Records and Ivor Associates before becoming director of publicity and advertising at Vanguard Recording Society in New York. Later she taught part-time in the communication-studies department at California State University, Sacramento, for 25 years. A colleague there called her “a bundle of energy and an absolutely gifted teacher who loved students.” Active in community and civic organizations, her involvement often focused on education, children, voter-awareness, and the arts. In her 25 years with the League of Women Voters of Sacramento she served as a public relations director, chair of the state of community fundraising luncheons, and as president (2001-03). She was a board member of numerous organizations and was a co-founder of the Capital Investment Club. And she did pro bono legal work for the Legal Center for the Elderly and Disabled. “When Madlyne thought something needed to be done, she … got out and did something about it,” said a longtime friend Lois Wright. Her father, Herman Altshuler W’23, died in 1987; her daughter is Jennifer E. MacDonald C’93.

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1966

Dr. David W. Morris M’66 GM’70, Bound Brook, N.J., a physician; June.

Frank Pinchick Ed’66, Doylestown, Pa., Oct. 1.

Lewis H. Platt WG’66, Portola Valley, Calif., the former chief executive officer of Hewlett-Packard and latterly of Kendall-Jackson Wine Estates; Sept. 8. He joined Hewlett-Packard as an engineer in 1966. He served as its chief from 1992 to 1999 and was known for his low-key management style, straightforward manner, and high principles, according to The New York Times. Under his leadership the company prospered in the 1990s. He then expanded the firm into the medical-instruments business. In 1999, when HP decided to recruit an outside chief executive, he supported and led the search for his successor. However, as a board member of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, he opposed a controversial merger with Compaq in 2002. After leaving Hewlett-Packard, he served for two years as the chief executive of Kendall-Jackson, a position in keeping with his own 2,500-bottle wine cellar. In 2005, as a lead board member and nonexecutive chair of Boeing, he initiated an investigation into then-CEO Harry C. Stonecipher’s affair with a company executive, which he found “inconsistent with Boeing’s code of conduct” and a hindrance to his ability to lead. Stonecipher was asked to resign.

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1968

Betty N. H. Mosteller Nu’68 GEd’87, Honey Brook, Pa., Sept. 3.

1971

William R. Keul WEv’71, Philadelphia, Feb. 3, 2005.

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1973

John V. Spangler GEE’73, Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., an electrical engineer with the U.S. government for 32 years, at the Frankford Arsenal in Philadelphia and then with Picatinney Engineering and Arsenal in New Jersey; Sept. 11. He had served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War.

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1980

Dr. Anthony D. Guerrieri C’80 D’84, Marlton, N.J., a dentist who practiced in Moorestown for nearly 20 years; Sept. 25.

Dr. Patricia O. Wachholz GEd’80 GrEd’00, Wayne, Pa., a retired human resources consultant; Sept. 19. For several years she taught English at Henderson High School in West Chester before becoming a human resources specialist at Rosenbluth Travel Agency in Philadelphia. She was then a human resources consultant until retiring in 2004. She was an adult literacy tutor and a volunteer with the Orphan Grain Train, an organization that distributes materials to areas in the U.S. and developing countries that have been hit by natural disasters. She was a board member and choir member of Christ Memorial Lutheran Church in Malvern.

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1981

Angela Petersen Cerf C’81, Philadelphia, September. She was a consultant at the American College of Physicians.

David R. Kahn C’81, Scarsdale, N.Y., president and CEO of Croscill, Inc., a home furnishings company; October. He was an advisory board member of the Duke University Eye Center.

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1985

Francis Liu ChE’85, São Paulo, a partner at Booz Allen & Hamilton in Brazil; July 25.

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1986

Dr. Matthew F. Granoff D’86 GD’87 GD’88, Cherry Hill, N.J., a dentist; Sept. 8.

Gerard E. Tarzia WG’86, Ambler, Pa., director of the monomers business unit of Rohm and Haas since 2002; Sept. 16. He joined the firm in 1986, and held numerous marketing and business assignments. During the 1990s he was general manager of the branches in Germany and then in Spain. He was became a corporate vice president in 1998. He was a trustee of Lehigh University and president of its alumni association.

1987

Lisa J. Maisels C’87, Cambridge, Mass., a project coordinator in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Office on Health and Disability; July 12, 2004. Earlier she had worked for the health and disability working group at the Boston University School of Public Health. Carol Tobias, the director, said Lisa “was passionate about the issues of health care for people who really need it—the systems, performance, access, and equity. She immediately started to conduct research and improve care for people with developmental disabilities and people with AIDS.” She coordinated a video, Making Parents Your Partners, which is used to teach hospital emergency department staff how to provide family-centered care to children with special health care needs. She developed and revised the Massachusetts Arthritis Action Plan and co-chaired the Cardiovascular Health Initiative’s access and disparities committee. The groundbreaking work she did on evaluating access to mammogram services for women with disabilities is being replicated in other states, such that the Breast Health Access project in California is using the “Lisa Maisels Mammography Checklist” in its training workshop for medical professionals. A co-worker, Janice Mirabassi, said “a major part of Lisa’s legacy is the way in which she taught medical personnel about the importance of ‘people first’ thinking: that a patient is not a ‘disabled person’, she is a person who happens to have a disability. Lisa had a brilliant energy … and a tenacity for justice and equality that was awe-inspiring.”

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1996

Adam J. Anhang W’96, San Juan, P.R., chief executive officer of the gaming software firm CasinoWebCam and former chief financial officer of Dr. Ho.com; Sept. 23. According to David Carruthers, CEO of Sportsbook BetonSports, he advanced the online gaming industry through his software, which brought the energy of the casino environment to users at their home computers. “Adam possessed the gift of being able to look at the status quo and find within it the potential of what could be,” said Carruthers, who cited his “creativity, commitment to excellence, and attention to detail.” Also a real estate developer and investor, he was a part-owner in the trendy Martineau Bay Resort & Spa, in Vieques, P.R. He was a popular guest lecturer in real estate at the Wharton School and had hoped to make teaching a large part of his life in the future. A fellowship in his name has been established, by faculty member Dr. Peter D. Linneman and his wife, at the Zell-Lurie Real Estate Center at the Wharton School. Adam’s sister is Rebecca J. Anhang C’98.

1998

Marilyn Maneely GNu’98, Haddonfield, N.J., a nurse and activist for marriage rights for gay people; Sept. 7. A home-care nurse, she specialized in assisting nursing mothers. In 2002 she became part of a lawsuit against the state of New Jersey, in which six same-sex couples filed for the right to legally wed, citing marriage as a civil right protected by the state constitution. The lawsuit is currently before the state supreme court. She and her domestic partner were active in the gay-rights struggle, often speaking at community rallies. Steven Goldstein, chair of Garden State Equity, a gay and lesbian political organization, called her an “irreplaceable, gallant fighter for civil rights. She was an extraordinary woman.”

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2001

Xavier G. Morelle WG’01, Gockhausen, Switzerland, Aug. 11. He had worked for McKinsey in London and for UBS in Zurich.

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Faculty & Staff

Dr. Florence S. Downs, Closter, N.J., emeritus professor of nursing; Sept. 8. She was appointed professor of nursing in 1977 and became associate dean for graduate studies. Before her retirement in 1994, she was instrumental in developing the master’s program and oversaw the establishment of the doctoral program. Within the greater nursing-research community, she was involved in the creation of both the Council of Nurse Researchers and the Eastern Nursing Research Society. And she served as academic editor of Nursing Research for 17 years. Throughout her 40-year career Dr. Downs taught seminars on research design and dissertation, and served as a research and graduate-curriculum consultant to national and international institutions. She published nine books, 50 articles, and 81 editorials. The American Academy of Nursing named her a “Living Legend” in 2004.

Dr. Chung-Tao Yang, Alexandria, Va., professor emeritus and former chair of mathematics; Sept. 15. Before coming to Penn, he was a post-doctoral fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. He joined the faculty as assistant professor of mathematics in 1956 and was promoted to associate professor two years later. He became full professor in 1961. During his tenure Dr. Yang helped the department achieve international prominence. He served as graduate chair in the early 1970s and as chair from 1978 to 1983. He became emeritus in 1991. He and his longtime collaborator, Deane Montgomery, were regarded by many as world leaders in the field of topological transformation groups, according to Dr. Herman R. Gluck, professor of mathematics. Later in his career he specialized in differential geometry—the language Einstein used to express his theory of relativity. “He was an unbounded, imaginative thinker,” said Dr. Gluck. Dr. Yang taught at the University of Illinois and at Nankai Institute in China and Taiwan. He was an honorary member of the Academia Sinica, the most academic institution in Taiwan. And he was instrumental in raising funds for a mathematics institute at Zhejiang University. One of his sons is Deane Yang C’79, and his daughters are Lynne Yang Hamrick C’81 and Jeanne Yang C’83.

Dr. Harry F. Zinsser Jr. See Class of 1949.


©2006 The Pennsylvania Gazette
Last modified 03/01/06

 


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