May | June 2005

1910

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1926

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Faculty & Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1922
Aline G. Mayer Ed’22, Wyndmoor, Pa., April 16, 2000.

1925
B. Milo Mitchel W’25, Flintridge, Calif., May 19, 2004.

Marguerite Shepler NTS’25, Harrisburg, Pa., June 19, 2004.

1927
Hope Mercer Balle Ed’27, Rydal, Pa., Nov. 16.

Dr. Leon L. Berns C’27, Wynnewood, Pa., a family practice physician for 70 years; Dec. 26. For 40 years he practiced medicine from his family home in the Strawberry Mansion district of Philadelphia. For the next 30 years he maintained an office in northeast Philadelphia, retiring five years ago. Dr. Berns taught anatomy for 63 years at Jefferson Medical College, donating his salary to Jefferson, his graduate alma mater.

Rudolph R. Glanckopf Sr. W’27, Plymouth, Mich., Sept. 4.

Francis A. Reddy Jr. WEv’27, Holland, Pa., May 25, 2004

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1929
Dr. Edward J. Matlavage D’29, Phoenix, a retired dentist; June 13, 2003.

Dr. William E. Reid D’29, Fort Plain, N.J., a retired dentist; April 17, 2004.

1930
Harry G. Kohler C’30, Fairfield, Conn., Dec. 23.

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1931
John H. Bertolet L’31, Reading, Pa., a retired attorney; Oct. 24.

Grace F. Dungan Ed’31, Southampton, Pa., Feb. 14, 2004.

William M. Neustaedter W’31, Laguna Hills, Calif., Oct. 10.

Walter E. Rapp C’31, Hartford, Conn., Dec. 19, 2002.

Edward R. Schwartz C’31, New York, June 7, 2004.

Naomi C. Sullivan Ed’31, Ambler, Pa., March 22, 2004.

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1932
Helen Korday Miller Ed’32, Center Point, Iowa, Oct. 31.

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1933
Margaret Kostenbauder NTS’33, Burlington, N.J., July 10, 2002.

Walter Lee Sheppard Jr. G’33, Havertown, Pa., Sept. 6, 2000.

Hyman Shiff W’33, Sandusky, Ohio, March 24, 2002.

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1934
William F. Blackman W’34, Mullica Hill, N.J., head of the estate planning unit of the old Girard Bank until his retirement in 1976; Jan. 19. He also was an estate planning tax adviser in Philadelphia for many years. As one of the founders of Natural Land Trust, his property was preserved without alterations to the land for future generations.

Lila Brinker NTS’34, Bethlehem, Pa., Feb. 10, 2002.

Dr. Charles S. Hertz M’34 GM’41, Allentown, Pa., a surgeon for more than 40 years, until his retirement in 1981; Dec. 30. He was chief of surgical services at Sacred Heart Hospital during the 1950s and at Quakertown Hospital for many years. He was also a staff surgeon at Allentown Hospital. Dr. Hertz was a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha honorary medical fraternity, and, in 1965, served as president of the Lehigh County Medical Society. A member of the Allentown Rotary Club for many years, he served as its president in 1953. In 1960 he was a commander of the Honorary First Defenders. He served as a director of the First National Bank of Allentown for 30 years. And he was a past director of the Allentown Chamber of Commerce and the Allentown chapter of the American Red Cross. Dr. Hertz participated in many athletic activities throughout his life, including playing tennis regularly until his late 80s. During World War II he served overseas in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, 1942-46.

Herbert D. Setlow W’34, Woodbridge, Conn., Oct. 21.

Dr. Earl J. Trexler D’34, Allentown, Pa., a retired dentist; Jan. 27, 2003.

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1935
Rodman V. Buggy EE’35 GEE’50, Milford, Del., Dec. 28.

Joseph A. Carnevale W’35, Stuart, Fla., a co-founder of Algen Press, a printing company in Queens, N.Y.; May 29, 2004. He founded the company in 1948 and served as an executive there until his retirement in 1972. In Florida he served as treasurer of the Lighthouse Point Homeowners Association for 10 years. He volunteered as a Meals on Wheels driver for 14 years and began volunteering at Martin Memorial Hospital at the age of 89. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in the European theater as a second lieutenant, and was discharged as a captain.

Ramon V. Gonzalez W’35, Condado, P.R., December. He was a dedicated follower of Penn Soccer, according to his wife.

Florence E. Horton DH’35, Woodbridge, Conn., June 1, 2004.

Ruth Roeder Miller Ed’35, Binghamton, N.Y., an elementary school teacher for 40 years in the Fulton, N.Y. school district; Dec. 7. At Penn she was one of the first female presidents of the Student Council. And she was one of the first women to receive academic scholarships to attend the University. She attended her 60th college reunion in 1995.

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1936
Russell H. Danielson W’36, Shelburne, Vt., Nov. 9, 2003.

Ralph J. Kunis C’36, Philadelphia, July 3.

Ruth Z. Lindenberg PSW’36, Honolulu, May 7, 2004.

Lloyd H. Rhodes W’36, Beachwood, Ohio, owner of the first health food store in Dallas, which he opened in 1952; Dec. 24. Earlier, he worked in radio and television, both before the microphone and in executive positions. He went on to own and operate a travel agency in Los Angeles for 15 years, which led to his writing a book, The World We Saw Is Gone Forever. During his retirement in Palm Springs, Calif., he taught travel geography, agency sales and management, and conversational English to foreign-born adults.

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1937
Carl D. Buchholz Jr. ME’37, Lansdale, Pa., Aug. 31.

Cornelia D. Cree Ed’37, Chambersburg, Pa., Nov. 2, 2001.

William Ernst WEv’37, Glenside, Pa., June 30, 2004.

Robert Fenton C’37, New York, a children’s book publishing executive for over 30 years; Oct. 13. He had served as vice president of Platt & Munk (publishers of The Little Engine That Could) and was a co-owner of Lion Press. At Penn he played basketball and tennis; he continued to play tennis on the amateur circuit for several years. His children are Paula B. Fenton CW’69, who is a vice president of her class, and Joan Fenton CW’73.

Edward E. Kagermann W’37, Treasure Island, Fla., Sept. 14.

Dr. Morris Kramer C’37, Wilkes Barre, Pa., April 14, 2000.

Rita Ficchi Price CW’37 G’41, Annapolis, Md., a sixth-grade teacher in the school system of Cherry Hill, N.J., from 1963 until her retirement in 1979; Dec. 2. She had worked for the Curtis Publishing Co. in Philadelphia from 1937 to 1941 and at Bloomingdale’s in New York, 1946-49. During World War II she was one of the first Women’s Army Corps officers, serving as a lieutenant colonel, 1941-46. She was a training officer in Des Moines, Iowa, and Daytona Beach, Fla., and a member of the War Department’s general staff at the Pentagon.

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1938
Nelridge N. Evans NTS’38, Newark, Del., Oct. 29.

Col. Norman H. Gold W’38, La Jolla, Calif., Oct. 10.

Alfred B. Pikus Ch’38, Oaklyn, N.J., March 21, 2001.

Martin P. Snyder L’38, Gladwyne, Pa., a retired attorney; Nov. 24.

Dr. William S. Tinney Jr. M’38, Lititz, Pa., a retired physician; July 5.

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1939
Irving A. Bornstein W’39, Canton, Mass., Sept. 2.

Sabina O. Keller NTS’39 Nu’57, Malvern, Pa., Aug. 5, 2002.

Robert J. Peel C’39 L’42, Frederick, Md., Jan. 25, 2004.

F. F. Troncelliti L’39, Ardmore, Pa., a retired attorney; Sept. 24, 2000.

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1940
Dr. Morgan Berthrong C’40, Colorado Springs, Colo., a retired physician; Aug. 13.

Dr. Richard H. Driscoll M’40, Pocono Lake Preserve, Pa., a staff surgeon at Presbyterian Hospital and Jeanes Hospital for 30 years and an associate professor of surgery at the Medical School; Jan. 12. From the late 1970s he served on the staff at Palmerton Hospital in Pocono Lake Preserve until retiring in the early 1980s. A lifelong sports fan, Dr. Driscoll was a member of the Medical School Alumni Club, the Football Club, and the Basketball Club. During World War II he served as a surgeon in the U.S. Navy, “island hopping” around the South Pacific. He retired from the Navy as a lieutenant commander.

Dr. Robert C. Gaul V’40, Hamburg, Pa., a retired veterinarian; Oct. 8.

Dr. Herman Miklowitz D’40, Boynton Beach, Fla., a retired dentist and periodontist; Jan. 8. As a medic in World War II, he was among the first allied troops to reach and free the concentration camp at Multhausen, Austria.

Alfred J. Moccia WEv’40, Rancho Mirage, Calif., Sept. 30.

Dr. Allen Nussbaum C’40 G’40 Gr’54, Minneapolis, Jan. 5.

Rabbi Elihu Schagrin C’40, Sarasota, Fla., a rabbi at Temple Concord of Binghamton, N.Y., for 32 years; Dec. 28. In retirement he served as interim rabbi in Melbourne, Australia; Wilkes Barre, Pa.; and Norwich, N.Y. He was a lifelong leader in numerous civic and professional organizations. A reform rabbi, he was honored by Binghamton’s Orthodox synagogue as their Man of the Year in 1981. Known for outreach beyond the Jewish community, Rabbi Schagrin was asked to represent other faiths at the ordination of Bishop Frank Harrison in 1971.

Dr. Pinkney C. Walker WG’40 Gr’55, Fort Myers, Fla., Aug. 29, 2003.

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1941
Hildegarde B. Harvey CW’41, Ocean View, N.J., Oct. 4.

John T. Higgins W’41, Greensboro, N.C., the retired vice president and tax counsel of Burlington Industries; Oct. 10, 2003. Earlier he had worked as an attorney for Haskins and Sells in Manhattan. At Penn he was a member of Beta Gamma Sigma fraternity. His brother-in-law, who was his roommate at Penn, is Dr. John W. Drebinger ME’41. His son is John T. Higgins Jr. C’69.

Clara Sleighter NTS’41, Hershey, Pa., May 25, 2004.

Joan Keller Williams Ed’41 GEd’42, Wilkes Barre, Pa., Nov. 10.

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1942
Dr. Amedeo Bondi Jr. Gr’42, Rydal, Pa., a retired microbiologist and teacher at Hahnemann Medical College; Jan. 28.

David L. Brody W’42, Monroe Township, N.J., Jan. 6.

Jack W. Goldman W’42, Elkins Park, Pa., July 8. His daughter is Janice D. Goldman-Whiddon FA’73.

Nancy Thompson Miller CW’42, Harvey Cedars, N.J., the former art editor of Presbyterian Life; Dec. 29. Earlier she had worked for Holiday magazine. Her husband is Austin R. Miller ChE’40 L’47.

Eleanor V. Quinn NTS’42, Willow Grove, Pa., March 7, 2001.

Charles Sabin W’42 L’47, Delray Beach, Fla., a retired attorney; May 3, 2004.

Dr. Louis Schoenleber C’42 D’43, Saddle River, N.J., a retired dentist; Jan. 7.

Robert B. Seipel ChE’42, Bradenton, Fla., a retired glassworks executive; Dec. 31. He began his career at Corning Glass Works in New York. He was a plant manager of Blue Ridge Glass in Tennessee before becoming executive vice president of manufacturing and engineering for ASG Industries, Inc., a company in partnership with American-Saint Gobain, a historic European glass producer. In 1977 he moved to Bradenton to oversee construction of the newest Tropicana glass furnace and manage the glass plant. He was a founding partner of both the Waterworks and Seipel and Seipel Insurance until his retirement in 2004. Active in civic and community organizations, he was a past president of the Tennessee-Virginia Palsy Center and received an award for 25 years of service to the Boy Scouts. He was a deacon and elder at Kirkwood Presbyterian Church. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy aboard the battleship U.S.S. Alabama in the Pacific Theater. He continued as a lieutenant in the Naval Reserve.

William A Snelling C’42, Sequim, Wash., April 16, 2004.

Dr. George Vogel D’42, Boynton Beach, Fla., a retired dentist; Nov. 30.

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1943
James C. Arthur W’43, Gwynedd Valley, Pa., Feb. 24, 2004.

Charlotte Katz Cohen Mu’43, Orlando, Fla., an opera singer and, for many years, a teacher of life skills to mentally retarded and emotionally troubled children; Dec. 21. She also served on the Geauga County Board for Mental Retardation. Her husband is John B. Cohen C’42. Two of her children are Dr. Peter R. Cohen C’70 and Douglas J. Cohen C’78 GAr’81, who is married to Teri Gross Cohen C’78 GEd’79.

Newell C. Doubleday W’43, Ontario, N.Y., Dec. 7. During World War II he served with the U.S. Navy in the South Pacific on board the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Shangri-La.

Warren Gray Jr. Ar’43 GAr’48, Washington, Aug. 16, 2003.

Richard J. Holt W’43, Easton, Md., Nov. 21.

Alexander H. Pappas W’43, Towson, Md., Oct. 15.

Stanley H. Pollinger W’43, Roslyn Heights, N.Y., Oct. 28.

Watson A. Sherrard WG’43, San Diego, June 29, 2003.

Benjamin E. Van Rensler EE’43, Lansdowne, Pa., a retired manufacturer’s representative; Jan. 11. He was a past president of Keystoner’s Association, a businessman’s organization. During World War II, he served in the U.S. Coast Guard, aboard the U.S.S. Samuel Chase, an attack carrier that participated in the invasions of North Africa, Sicily and Normandy, and the occupation of the Philippines.

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1944
Dr. Jerald M. Snyder C’44 D’45, Brookline, Mass., a dentist in Old Fort, N.C., for many years, until his retirement; April 13, 2004. His sister-in-law is Janet Brodsky Snyder Ed’52.

Jane H. Todd Ed’44, Juno Beach, Fla., a business teacher at Neshaminy High School in Langhorne, Pa., for 25 years; Nov. 28. She was a former volunteer for the U.S. Coast Guard and for the book shop of the Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea.

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1945
Dr. Samuel Abramson V’45 G’48, Bethesda, Md., a retired veterinarian; Sept. 1.

Dr. Frank S. Entwisle V’45, Langhorne, Pa., a veterinarian who established the Delaware Valley Animal Hospital in Fairless Hills, Pa., in 1956; Jan. 14. He had served as a captain in the Veterinary Corp of the U.S. Air Force.

Dr. Howard M. Grindlinger D’45, Boca Raton, Fla., a retired dentist; Nov. 8.

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1946
Benjamin Coates L’46, New York, a businessman; Dec. 7. In the 1950s he owned a box company and a furniture company. He then went into the oil business, and in 1955 launched a 50,000-ton tanker in Nagasaki, Japan. He subsequently owned two 300,000-ton tankers before switching his interest to real estate during the 1970s. He enjoyed riding and owning horses. In 1980 one of his seven racehorses, Tropicaro, won the Prix de Marcel Boussac at Longchamps in France. A student of history, he bought a set of autographs of the signers of the Declaration of Independence from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in 1976 because, as he said at the time, “this was the most important group of people ever gathered at one time in one place.” His own family history included an ancestor who was an original 1682 Pennsylvania settler; ancestors who managed property for Benjamin Franklin; and Samuel Coates, an early benefactor of Pennsylvania Hospital, who helped care for the sick during the yellow fever epidemics of 1793 and 1794. In 1981 he established two scholarships at Princeton University for Japanese students in honor of Fumitaka Konoe, a college classmate (at Princeton) whose father, Fumimaro Konoe, serving as prime minister of Japan in 1941, had tried to prevent war with the United States.

Dr. Aubrey J. Lewis C’46 D’46, Orlando, Fla., a retired dentist; Jan. 14. He worked as a dentist at the Florida State Hospitals in Chattahoochee and Arcadia, 1947-48, where he was promoted to senior dentist status. He established a private dental practice in 1948 in Arcadia and then in Orlando, where he practiced dentistry until his retirement in 1994. Dr. Lewis was granted the Retired Life Membership status in the American Dental Association and the Florida Dental Association. He was the dental officer for Fleet Air Squadron 51 at the U.S. Naval Air Station in Jacksonville from 1951 to 1953, during the Korean War.

Dr. Francis J. McLaughlin M’46, Boston, a retired physician; Dec. 21, 2002.

Ruth Heermann Ruddy CW’46, Naples, Fla., July 29. Her husband, Richard S. Ruddy ME’45, died Nov. 23, 2001.

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1947
Ella Benkoski NTS’47, Pittsburgh, Aug. 28, 2000.

Robert T. Boylan W’47, Falls Church, Va., June 21, 2004. At Penn he was a member of the football team.

Dr. Genevieve Burton Ed’47, Newtown Square, Pa., Sept. 13.

Robert O. Dellinger W’47, Fort Wayne, Ind., Oct. 23.

Kathleen Grussenmeyer NTS’47, Shoreview, Minn., March 25, 2004.

Margaret C. Kauffman Ed’47 GEd’49, Philadelphia, Sept. 16, 2001. Her husband, Joseph Kauffman C’50, died Dec. 24, 2003.

William G. Killhour C’47, Hilton Head Island, S.C., the retired president of W. B. Killhour and Sons, Inc., a paper distributorship in Philadelphia; Dec. 3. His family had been in the paper business since 1881. He was president of the company in 1981 when fire destroyed its warehouse and offices in south Philadelphia. Despite an opportunity to move to the suburbs, he rebuilt in the Eastwick section of the city. A civic booster, his trucks were imprinted with the slogan “Believe Philadelphia.” He retired in 1987, three years after his company merged with Commercial Card and Paper Co. He took up rowing at age 49 and went on to win 23 world medals and 19 national championship gold medals in master’s rowing events. A member of the Undine Barge Club in Philadelphia, he helped found the Palmetto Rowing Club in Hilton Head. He stopped rowing three years ago, following his third hip replacement, according to his son. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy as a torpedo officer on the destroyer U.S.S. Stanly in the Pacific.

Robert M. Landis L’47, Gladwyne, Pa., a partner and former chair of the Philadelphia law firm Dechert, Price & Rhodes, where he worked for nearly 50 years; Jan. 1. He remained counsel there after retiring in the late 1980s. At Penn he was editor of the Law Review. He was a guest lecturer at Temple University Law School and spoke often to groups about his concern that Congress was attempting to limit federal courts’ jurisdiction, according to his former secretary. In a 1982 commentary in The Philadelphia Inquirer, he wrote that liberties and rights must not be jeopardized by congressional attempts to “mutate” the First Amendment of the Constitution. Early in his career he served as a deputy city solicitor for Philadelphia. He was chancellor of the Philadelphia Bar Association in 1970 and later president of the Pennsylvania Bar Association. He was past president of the American College of Trial Lawyers. During the 1980s he served two terms as chair of the Federal Reserve Bank in Philadelphia. He was director of the Greater Philadelphia Urban Affairs Coalition, president of the Fellowship Commission of Philadelphia, and chair of the Children’s Aid Society of Pennsylvania. A bibliophile, he served on the board of the University of Pennsylvania Press and Houghton Mifflin Publishing Co., where he was a legal consultant for Houghton’s American Heritage Dictionary. And he reviewed books about law and justice for The Philadelphia Evening Bulletin for several years. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in Europe.

John D. Lee Jr. WEv’47, Wilmington, Del., the retired Worldwide manager for the Teflon and Silverstone divisions of the DuPont Co.; Dec. 4. He began working for DuPont as a stock boy in Philadelphia at age 14. Following his retirement after a 48-year career with the company, he remained as a consultant for DuPont and engaged in a marketing venture with the Edgecraft Corporation. He served on the boards of many community organizations. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army as a captain of ordinance.

William N.W. Pass G’47, Eagles Mere, Pa., a vice president of Tasty Baking Co. of Philadelphia, until his retirement in 1984; Jan. 2. He joined the company in 1957 and established its human resources department. Earlier, he taught elementary students at the Houston School and at Chestnut Hill Academy for 11 years. And he taught biology at Chester High School.

Frederick R. Scheerer C’47, Littleton, Colo., Sept. 18. He had worked for Atlantic Richfield Co. His sister is Dr. Anne E. Scheerer Ed’46 GEd’47 Gr’53.

Robert W. Smith Jr. G’47, Marietta, Ga., a retired mathematician; Dec. 27. For most of his career he was a research mathematician for the Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh. He retired from the U.S. Department of Energy. And he was a part-time instructor of mathematics at Carnegie-Mellon University. He was active in civic and social organizations, including the WMCA, in which he held several leadership roles. For many years he served on the vestry of Holy Cross Episcopal Church. During World War II he served overseas as a Warrant Officer in supply for the U.S. Army.

Dr. Albert Van Eerde II M’47, Wayne, N.J., a retired physician; July 18, 2002.

Elias Wilson GEd’47, Baltimore, Jan. 28, 2003.

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1948
Eugene Arnold Jr. W’48, Newtown Square, Pa., a retired head of an investment company; Jan. 22. He began his career working with his father in the stock brokerage business. In 1965 he and a partner purchased Hopper Soliday, a brokerage firm that had been founded in Philadelphia in 1873. After the firm was sold to Decision/Capital Fund in 1988, he remained as chair until 1993. He was then managing director of Philadelphia Corporation, an investment-services company, until his retirement in 2004. During the 1970s he was chair of the National Association of Securities Dealers and helped found the Nasdaq stock exchange. As a B-17 pilot and squad leader based in England for the U.S. Air Corps during World War II, he completed 30 combat missions over Germany, including two missions in planes disabled by enemy fire. According to his wife, he was able to return to base in one disabled plane, and landed the other in a Belgian strip that had been liberated by the Allies the day before. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Peter Bedrick C’48, New York, the former publisher of Schocken Books, who later founded two publishing companies; Dec. 8. After working in his father’s drugstore, he joined the sales staff of Schocken Books in 1963. Founded in 1931, the company published Judaica, including the works of Kafka and S.Y. Agnon, who later won the Nobel Prize in literature. As Schocken expanded its areas of interest, he became executive vice president and publisher and was responsible for two sleeper hits in 1981: Masquerade, by Kit Williams, and When Bad Things Happen to Good People, by Harold S. Kushner. Both books became bestsellers. He left Schocken in 1983 and, with his wife, founded Peter Bedrick Books, which published children’s illustrated nonfiction. When the house was sold to the Tribune Company and, in 2000, to McGraw-Hill, he remained as a consultant. The couple went on to found Enchanted Lion Press in 2003, which published nonfiction books for children, young adults, and adults.

E. Palmer Comegys Jr. WEv’48, Lancaster, Pa., Dec. 24.

Solomon Ellis W’48, Bala Cynwyd, Pa., Sept. 21.

Rev. Wilson M. Evans C’48, Allentown, Pa., a Presbyterian minister who served churches in New Jersey, New Mexico, Colorado, and Texas; Dec. 31. In his later years he worked as an accountant for Bethlehem Steel Corporation. During World War II he had served in the U.S. Navy.

Dr. Henry D. Garrett GM’48, El Paso, Tex., a retired physician; April 7, 2004.

Leonard M. Heine Jr. W’48, Weston, Conn., Oct. 28.

Kalvin Kahn C’48, Philadelphia, an attorney and animal-rights activist; Jan. 1.

Edwin B. Lickfield WEv’48, Haddonfield, N.J., Dec. 2.

Ehrman B. Mitchell Jr. Ar’48, Philadelphia, a retired architect and co-founder of the architectural firm Mitchell/Giurgola (now MGA Partners); Jan. 18. In 1958 he and partner Romaldo Giurgola founded their firm, which became a leading member of what became known as the Philadelphia School. With Giurgola as the design talent, “‘Mitch’ was the constructor,” said Alan Greenberger, who joined the firm in 1974 and is now a partner with its successor, MGA Partners. “He was the one who took an image on a piece of paper and gave it life.” The firm’s first big success occurred in 1960, with the design of a visitor center for the Wright Brothers National Memorial on the North Carolina coast. Two years later they produced a two-window wide addition to the Philadelphia Life Insurance Co. “Although the original portion features a columned classical façade, the addition is as flat and geometric as a Mondrian painting. Yet they harmonize perfectly,” said architectural critic Inga Saffron in The Philadelphia Inquirer. This mix of modern design and urban values helped the firm gain an international reputation and win commissions, including the Penn Mutual Tower, the United Way headquarters, and the 1976 Liberty Bell Pavilion. In 1972 his complaints about Philadelphia’s “pay to play” culture, with architects and engineers required to hand over five percent of their fees on government projects to Democratic party bosses, led to a grand-jury investigation. Known for his high principles, he and Giurgola withdrew from a coveted commission to design the AIA’s headquarters in Washington to protest intrusive design revisions. He was elected national president of the American Institute of Architects in 1979.

Rev. C. Glenn Orr G’48, Doylestown, Pa., Feb. 21, 2002.

Roy Larry Schlein ChE’48, Cherry Hill, N.J., Dec. 13.

Ella Troster NTS’48, Rowlett, Tex., Oct. 11, 2000.

Eileen Kehr Vansant GEd’48, Pinehurst, N.C., April 25, 2004.

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1949
Col. John C. Bane GEE’49, Jekyll Island, Ga., Nov. 24.

Thomas G. Clark WG’49, Wooster, Ohio, Jan. 29, 2004.

Catherine Riley Gibson CW’49, Sun City Center, Fla., a retired attorney; Nov. 22.

Rita Packman Korn Mu’49, Bala Cynwyd, Pa., Dec. 10. She wrote and directed two plays for Rosemont College.

Martin Levine C’49, Jenkintown, Pa., Oct. 29, 2002.

Ann Allen Mandel SW’49, Levittown, Pa., Oct. 23.

Emil J. Medvidik WEv’49, Downingtown, Pa., Nov. 10.

Harold Musnitsky EE’49, Narberth, Pa., March 23, 2003.

Francis X. O’Brien C’49, Philadelphia, Sept. 10.

Joseph L. Roantree G’49, Philadelphia, Sept. 28, 2002.

Lt.Cmdr. Harry E. Scarborough W’49, Merritt Island, Fla., April 13, 2004.

Dr. Norvel L. Smith Ed’49 GEd’50, Oakland, Calif., Nov. 27.

Nicholas Zulli Ed’49 GEd’54, Havertown, Pa., March 9, 2001.

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1950
Dr. Joseph E. Alfano GM’50, Chicago, an ophthalmologist and a retired clinical professor of ophthalmology at Northwestern University Medical School; Sept. 21. He chaired the eye department at Children’s Memorial Hospital and served on the staff of then Passavant and Wesley hospitals (now Northwestern Memorial Hospital). Dr. Alfano was a consultant to the Cook County Hospital and lectured to the Cook County School of Nursing. He was consultant to the Lakeside Veterans Administration Hospital as well as the Eye and Ear Infirmary, and served as co-chair of ophthalmology for the Illinois Central Railroad. He was on the editorial staff of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, primarily translating the Italian journal of ophthalmology into English. He published 50 papers in the ophthalmology field and wrote the eye sections of two books. Dr. Alfano received two Awards of Merit from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the Physicians Recognition Award from the American Medical Association. The Chicago Medical Society and the Medical College of Wisconsin honored him with distinguished physician awards. In 1981 he received a Juris Doctor degree and became active in medical-legal affairs. On his retirement, Dr. Alfano donated all of his eye equipment, furniture, and instruments to the Haiti Eye Clinic. An ardent fan of ballet and opera, he once dined with opera legend Renata Tebaldi and her mother following a performance. And he once carried a pheasant across the stage in the ballet Giselle at the Lyric Opera House. He served in the U.S. armed forces from 1943 to 1947, receiving a Victory Ribbon and an Overseas Ribbon.

Harry J. Bagley C’50, Southfield, Mich., Aug. 20.

Frances E. Dyson SW’50, New York, Nov. 9, 2000.

William G. Eads ME’50, Villanova, Pa., an engineer who was an authority on environmental systems; Dec. 9. He worked for area building contractors for more than 30 years before establishing an engineering consulting firm in 1981. He was the author of a nationally-used guide for testing, balancing, and adjusting environmental systems such as heating, refrigeration, ventilation, and air conditioning. He taught courses on environmental balancing at Temple University and taught and wrote syllabi for trade association training programs. During World War II he served stateside in the U.S. Navy.

Dr. George R. Gray D’50, Longmeadow, Mass., a retired dentist; Aug. 17.

Joseph Kauffman C’50, Philadelphia, Dec. 24, 2003. His wife, Margaret C. Kauffman Ed’47 GEd’49, died Sept. 16, 2001.

Dr. Burton R. Landes G’50, Collegeville, Pa., Sept. 30, 2003.

Dr. Aaron Lemonick C’50, Princeton, N.J., professor emeritus of physics and former dean of the Graduate School and dean of the faculty of Princeton University; June 19, 2003. “I never did ‘decide’ to be a teacher,” he said in a 1972 interview. “In my senior year it just became clear that that’s what I was!” He began his career in higher education as an assistant professor of physics at Haverford College, where he taught for seven years and chaired the physics department for four. In 1961 he returned to Princeton (his graduate alma mater) as associate professor of physics and associate director of the Princeton-Penn Accelerator, where he was in charge of the research program. He became professor of physics in 1964. He served as dean of the Graduate School from 1968 to 1973 and dean of the faculty from 1973 to 1989. As dean of the Graduate School, he initiated imaginative new efforts to recruit graduate students from previously underrepresented populations, especially African Americans. After 21 years in administration he returned to the physics department in 1989. In 1990 Dr. Lemonick joined the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as deputy director for administrative operations. At his retirement in 1994, Princeton awarded him its President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching, being cited as a “master teacher” who was able to “make difficult concepts obvious and the most routine problems adventures in understanding.” In a letter to Dr. Lemonick a former student wrote, “If your goal as a teacher is to be remembered by your students as caring, approachable, and involved, you have more than succeeded … Thank you for being what a teacher should be. I feel lucky to have been in your class.” Dr. Lemonick returned to Princeton to teach freshman physics labs and served as director of the Quest program, a summer science seminary for local elementary school teachers. He was associated with the Princeton University Press for 30 years, serving as vice president of the board and chair of the executive committee. And he participated for several summers in the Latin American Institutes for Physics Teachers, instructing teachers in South America. In 2001 Princeton awarded him an honorary Doctor of Science degree. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, where he was General Mark Clark’s radio operator in the North Africa campaign.

Mario Montanaro Ed’50 GEd’51, Broomall, Pa., Jan. 1, 2004.

Archibald Nicholas Jr. W’50, Dover, N.J., Dec. 21.

Henry C. Senger WG’50, Fort Lee, N.J., a retired financial consultant and senior vice president of Smith Barney; Jan. 5. Earlier he was a supervisor with Curtiss Wright. He served on the boards of Emmaus House Homeless Shelter in New York and St. Aloysius Church in Manhattan. He was also a member of the Smith Barney chair council and was a longtime volunteer at Covenant House in New York. While serving in the U.S. Army during World War II, he was present at the liberation of the Dachau concentration camp and helped in the capture of its S.S. commandant.

Dr. Fred Stephenson C’50 D’52, Watchung, N.J., a retired dentist; Nov. 20.

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1951
Dr. Julio J. Amadio GM’51, Haverford, Pa., a retired physician; Jan. 4.

Dr. Eleanor M. Aurand M’51, Lewistown, Pa., a retired physician; Sept. 15.

David Tsu Yu Chen WG’51, Great Neck, N.Y., the retired owner and president of a shipping business, United Transport Co. NYC and Transocean Navigation, Inc. NYC; Nov. 27. He owned a fleet of ships transporting cargo from port to port worldwide.

Mary E. Crisman Nu’51, Coatesville, Pa., April 11, 2002.

William A. Crump Jr. EE’51, Cincinnati, Nov. 13.

Horace M. Fetterolf Jr. WEv’51, Havertown, Pa., July 14, 2004.

John B. Harden WEv’51, Media, Pa., a retired businessman; July 19.

Frank Z. Higley W’51, Norwich, N.Y., Dec. 14.

William H. Ramin Ar’51, Reynoldsburg, Ohio, Nov. 27.

Dr. Frank C. Saponare GEd’51, Cherry Hill, N.J., June 2, 2003.

Dr. William Siegler D’51, West End, N.C., a retired dentist; Oct. 28.

Dr. Charles M. Stephenson D’51, Mentor, Ohio, a retired dentist; Sept. 17, 2002.

Richard H. Stohlman W’51, Chevy Chase, Md., founder and chair of Stohlman Volkswagen/Subaru and Stohlman Mitsubishi; Nov. 10. He began his career working for his father’s Chevrolet dealership, which was founded in Washington during the 1930s. He became vice president in 1956 and started his own company, Stohlman Volkswagen, in 1971. He added Subaru in 1977 and Mitsubishi in 1981. Throughout the expansion of the two businesses, which have ranked in the top 20 nationally in sales, he maintained the family atmosphere of a small company. Active in numerous civic and trade associations, he was also an avid art collector. And he received the AIADA-Sports Illustrated Dealer of Distinction Award. Five years ago he set up a research grant for the study of gastric and breast cancer through the Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation, based in Alexandria, Va. He had served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army, stationed mostly in Paris, until 1956.

Isabel Dinnage VanDolsen CW’51, Wilson, N.C., Dec. 23.

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1952
Col. John W. Bowen W’52, Green Valley, Ariz., May 22, 2004.

Rosannah V. Cole CW’52, Wading River, N.Y., April 7, 2004.

David J. Frey WEv’52, Bryn Mawr, Pa., Oct. 24.

Albert M. Garber ME’52 GME’55, Wynnewood, Pa., March 17, 2001.

Albert O. Hamilton WEv’52, Somersworth, N.H., September.

William R. Risden Jr. C’52, Freehold, N.J., Dec. 10, 2003.

Mary Louise Rubenstein SW’52, Syracuse, N.Y., Feb. 8, 2003.

Dr. William L. Saunders D’52, Greensboro, N.C., a retired dentist; Jan. 21, 2004.

Dr. Warren Schneider GD’52, Boca Raton, Fla., a retired dentist; Nov. 8.

Eugene H. Trapp W’52, Newton, N.J., Nov. 30, 2003.

David C. Webster W’52, Norwalk, Conn., Nov. 20.

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1953
Robert E. Beris W’53, Boca Raton, Fla., Sept. 8.

Dr. Earl G. Blackburn V’53, Sellersville, Pa., a veterinarian who co-ran the Quakertown Veterinary Clinic and owned a house-call practice until his retirement in 1994; Dec. 25. He also worked as a veterinary supervisor for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In 1987 he received the certificate of supervisory excellence from the Food Safety and Inspection Service. During World War II he was a sergeant in the U.S. Army, serving in England, Africa, and Italy.

Dr. Walter J. Demer GD’53, Ashburn, Va., a retired dentist; Jan. 29, 2004.

John S. Hinkle IV W’53, Wilmington, Del., retired president of the Employers Association of Florida; Dec. 21. Earlier he had worked in New York, St. Louis, and Kansas City. After moving to Orlando in 1975, he was president of Vanda Beauty Counselor and then the Employers Association. He had served in the U.S. Marine Corps.

Marion Shannon Kern GFA’53, Stratford, N.J., Jan. 18, 2002.

Arnold J. Palmer W’53 WG’53, Parsippany, N.J., Dec. 8.

Matthew Picard W’53, Woodbury, N.Y., a retired attorney; June 6, 2004.

Richard M. Saul L’53, Washington, a retired attorney who helped develop federal antipoverty programs; Dec. 20. He began his career at his father’s Philadelphia law firm, Saul, Ewing, Remick & Saul, and was active in the creation and early operation of public television station WHYY in Philadelphia. In 1960 he became a lawyer with the broadcast bureau of the Federal Communications Commission in Washington, where he served as the first chief of the complaints branch in the bureau’s complaints and compliance division. In 1965 he joined the new federal Office of Economic Opportunity, part of President Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society and war on poverty. He was first a program developer for Volunteers in Service to America, establishing projects in Oklahoma and Texas. He went on to become chief of program development for nine states in the Southwest and West. In 1967 he joined the OEO's Action Program, developing and overseeing grant programs and nationwide initiatives to address the needs of low-income individuals and communities, including setting up community credit unions and consumer cooperatives and creating jobs and economic development. He also worked on addressing the energy needs of low-income people. Responding to the 1973 energy crisis, he conceived the idea of insulating homes of the poor and funded a pilot project, which was operative within six weeks, that was the first step toward comprehensive federal weatherization programs. He retired in 1981. In 1987 he established a nonprofit environmental consulting firm, Jobs for a Clean Environment. In 1989 he developed the booklet “Seeds of Opportunity,” which described the OEO programs at that time. He rejoined the office of Health and Human Services in 1994 and retired again in 2004. He served on the board of the National Center for Appropriate Technology of Butte, Mont., and Educating Children for Parenting of Philadelphia. And he enjoyed a long association with Los Desempleados, an informal group of former OEO employees who lost their jobs when the Reagan administration ended the federal antipoverty program in 1981. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in France.

Paul V. Spillar W’53, Napa, Calif., a retired advertising executive, marketing consultant, and travel director; Dec. 2. At Penn he was a member of Theta Chi fraternity. Born in Prague, Czechoslovakia, he emigrated to America with his family in 1941 to escape the Nazi invasion, while losing some of his family members to the Holocaust. He began his career as a senior copywriter for the New York advertising agency Doyle Dane Bernbach, where he contributed to the “Think Small” ad campaign for Volkswagen that ignited American Sales of the Beetle. Later, working as creative director for Grey Advertising and other firms in San Francisco, he coined ad slogans, including “Take the Easy Way Out” for the Oakland Airport and “Easy Come, Easy Go” for United Airlines. For most of the last 20 years he was a marketing consultant, publisher and editor of The Single Traveler newsletter, and an international tour director, using his knowledge of Spanish, German, Czech, and French to guide Americans to the great cities of Europe and introduce Europeans to the natural and manmade wonders of the United States. He served in the U.S. Army from 1955 to 1957, where he was a sports reporter for the Stars & Stripes newspaper in Japan.

Edward S. Stouch WEv’53, Media, Pa., July 8.

Viola (“Gene”) Allinson Thomas Ed’53 GEd’55, Marmora, N.J., a retired teacher of elementary school and later remedial reading; Jan. 1. She taught at schools in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, most recently at Atlantic City High School, until her retirement in 2000.

James F. Trautman WG’53, Sunrise, Fla., March 4, 2004.

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1954
Neil C. (“Pete”) Estabrook Jr. W’54, Indianapolis, a retired stockbroker; Dec. 1. At Penn he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. And he had been a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. Two of his sons are Ross F. Estabrook C’92 and Neil C. Estabrook III C’90, whose wife is Nancy Achre Estabrook W’90.

Dr. Frederick R. Innes Gr’54, Boston, a physicist at the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hanscom Air Force Base in Bedford, Mass., until his retirement in 1985; Jan. 4. He conducted research on the interaction of atomic particles in the upper atmosphere. During the 1950s he worked on a number of research projects with physicists in Japan, which led to his interest in Asian art. Following his retirement he became an avid collector, purchasing Asian art, American landscape paintings, and objects from the Arts and Crafts Movement of the late 19th century. Shortly before his death he had rented a second apartment in order to house his extensive collection. “He was obviously eccentric, but he was a true renaissance man who was an expert on Oriental art,” said his nephew, James E. Innes II CGS’80. Dr. Innes spent many evenings at the MIT library, where he claimed to be working on his theory of the “hypersphere”—but, according to a friend, “I think he just liked the company.” During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy as an information officer aboard the heavy cruiser U.S.S. Northampton. After the ship was sunk during the Battle of Tassafaronga in the Pacific, he served on the heavy cruiser U.S.S. Baltimore. His niece is Genevieve R. Innes C’86.

Aaron Kauffman WEv’54, Scottsdale, Ariz., Nov. 25, 2003.

Leonard G. Levy C’54 WG’56, Montclair, N.J., Aug. 1, 2003.

Sheldon P. Neuhard W’54, Orlando, Fla., Nov. 12.

Robert E. Shakeshaft Ed’54, Hillsborough, N.C., May 4, 2004.

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1955
Dr. Arthur D. Beard C’55, Surprise, Ariz., an internal consultant for the DuPont Company until his retirement in 1999; Oct. 10. He began his career as a journalist for the U.S. Navy. He then worked in women’s fashion merchandising for Marshall Field & Co. in Chicago and for R. R. Donnelly, in the production of magazines such as Road & Track and National Geographic. He was a professor of marketing at Texas Tech University, the University of Iowa, and Central Michigan University before joining DuPont, where he worked for almost 18 years. While at DuPont, he worked on five continents with managers of various DuPont businesses to help them improve their marketing skills. A lifelong model train enthusiast, he helped found the Grand Railroaders Group in Sun City Grand, Ariz.

Ellen R. Convery Nu’55, Philadelphia, July.

Kathryn Confair Garrison Nu’55, Glen Ellyn, Ill., Oct. 8.

Rev. David J. Hoh G’55, York, Pa., Dec. 23, 2003.

Harry W. Unruh WEv’55, Cape May, N.J., Nov. 29.

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1956
Thomas G. Ashton C’56, Chester Springs, Pa., a lawyer in Coatesville and West Chester, where he served as district attorney; Dec. 28. He was a township supervisor and solicitor of West Pikeland. And he was a former captain of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry.

Dr. Bruce S. Blauch V’56, Manhattan, Kan., a retired veterinarian; Jan. 8.

Robert W. Rainey W’56, Doylestown, Pa., May 10, 2004.

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1957
Jane P. Bradbeer CW’57, Wayne, Pa., June 23, 2004.

Dr. Edward H. Devine V’57, Little Silver, N.J., a veterinarian who attended to Allaire duPont’s great horse, Kelso, and also to the 1980 Horse of the Year, Spectacular Bid; Dec. 15.

Shafique Saigol W’57, Cherry Hill, N.J., June 8, 2004.

Frederick B. Ziesenheim L’57, Pittsburgh, a retired attorney; Dec. 8.

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1958
Richard L. Bell C’58, West Palm Beach, Fla., Oct. 12.

Dr. Morton I. Bromberg D’58, Boca Raton, Fla., a retired pediatric dentist who maintained a practice for over 40 years in Newburgh, N.Y.; Feb. 28, 2004. A patient library at Holy Cross Hospital in Lauderdale has been established in his memory. His wife is Beverly Chester Bromberg DH’58. One of his daughters is Michele Bromberg Title DH’81 C’82 and his son-in-law is Jeffrey H. Title C’81.

Theodore R. Davis W’58, Delray Beach, Fla., Nov. 10.

Willard D. Lorensen GL’58, Morgantown, W.Va., a former dean and professor emeritus of law at West Virginia University; Oct. 26. He began his career as a Bigelow Teaching Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, 1958-59. In 1959 he joined the faculty at West Virginia University College of Law, where he taught criminal law, local government, and federal courts, among other courses. He served as dean of the College of Law from 1972 to 1978, when he returned to teaching. At his retirement in 1996, he had the honor of being one of the longest tenured professors at the College of Law. “He taught for 37 years,” said John W. Fisher II, the current dean. “He was an extremely knowledgeable, Socratic teacher who guided students with questions instead of giving you answers.” In 2000 he received the Justicia Officium award, which recognizes outstanding contributions and service to the legal profession. He served in the U.S. Army in Korea, 1952-54.

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1959
Dr. Egal Feldman Gr’59, Superior, Wis., professor emeritus of history and former dean of the College of Letters and Sciences at the University of Wisconsin at Superior; Aug. 21. He began his teaching career as an assistant professor at the University of Texas at Arlington in 1960. In 1966 he joined the faculty at Wisconsin, where he taught American history and courses on Israel and the Middle East. He served for four years as dean and for 16 years as chair of the department of history. He retired in 1994, after 35 years of teaching. Dr. Feldman was the author of numerous books, most recently, Catholics and Jews in Twentieth-Century America 2001 (University of Illinois Press), which won the Kenneth Kingery Scholarly Book Award from the Council of Wisconsin Writers in 1992. His earlier books include Dual Destinies: The Jewish Encounter with Protestant America and The Dreyfus Affair and the American Conscience, 1895-1906. He contributed chapters and essays to many books, and scholarly articles and book reviews to numerous journals. He guest-lectured at the Sorbonne and American universities. Dr. Feldman was a four-time recipient of the Max H. Lavine Award for Scholarly Contributions to Contemporary Concerns, given by the University of Wisconsin at Superior. He also received the Burlington Northern Foundation Faculty Achievement Award for Research, and was named Teacher of the Year. He was featured as a historical commentator in the television documentary film, Silent Cal Goes Fishing, made in commemoration of President Calvin Coolidge’s fondness for fishing in the Brule River. Dr. Feldman was a past president of Temple Beth El in Superior and served on the board of Temple Israel in Duluth.

Nicholas Kloap ChE’59, Allison Park, Pa., Aug. 24.

Joseph P. Mundy MtE’59, Ballston Lake, N.Y., Aug. 12.

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1960
Margaret T. Cahoon GEd’60, Atco, N.J., Sept. 1, 2003.

Charles B. Moore GEE’60, Wilmington, Del., Sept. 1.

1961
Dr. Charles P. Hall Jr. Gr’61, Glenside, Pa., professor emeritus and former associate dean at Temple University, who founded its graduate health administration program; Jan. 21. He taught at the University of Washington in Seattle before joining the faculty at Temple in 1966. There he developed the program in health administration, which has become widely recognized at the college’s Fox School of Business and Management. He chaired the program for its first seven years and then again from 1987 to 1994, serving as associate dean of the business and management school between those terms. In 1995 he became director of Temple’s International MBA program. After retiring in 2001, he continued to serve as a consultant to the program. Dr. Hall wrote numerous articles on risk, health care, and insurance, including research that was used as part of a 1993 White House briefing on health-care reform. He served as an elder at Carmel Presbyterian Church in Glenside and sang with the Breath of Dawn Music Ministry. Dr. Hall was inspired to become an educator by his service in the U.S. Air Force, where he taught navigation classes to groups of international servicemen while stationed in Germany.

Elliott J. Turetzky W’61, Las Vegas, a physician who practiced in Woodmere, N.Y., and later in Las Vegas, until his retirement; Dec. 30.

Gilbert S. White W’61, Worthington, Ohio, Sept. 28, 2002.

1962
Dr. Albert J. Allen Jr. D’62, Halifax, Mass., a dentist; Oct. 19. He joined his father’s dental practice in 1964 and practiced in Braintree, Mass., his entire career. He also taught at Tufts Dental School. Earlier he was a dental officer at the U.S. Marine Corps Recruit Depot at Parris Island, S.C., from 1962 to 1964. During the 1980s he was a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army National Guard.

Dr. Milton R. Horwitz C’62 GM’68, Longboat Key, Fla., a physician; March 20, 2004.

Dr. Ralph S. Shay Gr’62, Lebanon, Pa., Dec. 2.

Charles L. Zimmerman GEd’62, Palmyra, Pa., Dec. 11.

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1963
Rupert Hoover GEE’63, Las Vegas, June 4, 2003.

Selina B. King SW’63, Philadelphia, Sept. 26, 2000.

Janet Movshovitz Nystrom CW’63, Richmond, July 20.

Dr. Thomas F. Toomey Jr. M’63, Collegeville, Pa., a physician; Jan. 28.

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1964
William C. Frankle WEv’64, Hyattsville, Md., Sept. 4.

Harry F. Hochman C’64, Whitehouse Station, N.J., May 13, 2004.

Jonathan B. Kamber C’64 WG’66, New York, June 6, 2004.

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1965 |

Mary A. Yost Thompson Nu’65, Hummelstown, Pa., Dec. 23. She was retired from the Pennsylvania Department of Health, where she worked in community health.

Dr. Alexander O. Williams W’65 Gr’72, Dunwoody, Ga., May 27, 2004.

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1967
Alison W. Barker G’67, Concord, N.H., a classics teacher for over 30 years; Dec. 28. Between 1995 and 2004 she was on the faculty at St. Paul’s School in Concord. At the time of her death she was teaching Greek and Latin at St. Joseph’s College in Windham, Maine. A veteran traveler, she often led student trips to Greece and Italy. She was a member of the Classical Association of New England for many years, and served as its president in 2003-04.

Rose Mary Boheler GEd’67, Wallingford, Pa., July 28, 2001.

Abraham Schwartz SW’67 GCP’69, Riverside, Calif., Nov. 13.

Judith Nisenholtz Scioli CW’67, Philadelphia, Jan. 18. At Penn she was president of Sigma Delta Tau sorority. In 1984 she was a reporter for the Potomac Almanac. Within seven years she became the general manager and editor-in-chief of the parent company’s 16 weekly newspapers. She became the public information officer for Montgomery County, Maryland in 1993, and eventually served as press secretary to then Governor Parris Glendening. Her last position was general manager of communications and external affairs for the Maryland Port Administration. At the time of her death she was writing a novel based on her experience as a journalist and public information officer. Her husband, Robert S. Barnett C’67, said that while at Penn, “Judi, along with her sorority sister, Leslie Simons Stiles CW’67, were the rock band E-Jax’s first, and perhaps only, groupies … In 1998 Judi and I reunited.” The couple lived in Philadelphia for the past five years, where they reconnected with other classmates, particularly Leslie and her husband, Hon. Michael R. Stiles C’67. Judith’s sons are Dr. Adam D. Scioli C’94, whose wife is Corinne Basmeson Scioli C’95 GEd’96; and Anthony D. Scioli C’96, whose wife is Andee Friedlander Scioli C’96. Her brother is Martin A. Nisenholtz C’77 ASC’79 and his wife is Anne E. Stockler C’79.

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1968
Harriet H. Bond G’68, Towson, Md., Jan. 12, 2004.

Andrew W. Butler GLA’68, San Francisco, Sept. 6.

Lawrence D. Landy EE’68, Freehold, N.J., July 16.

George Thomas Rogers GEE’68, Buena Vista, Va., an electrical engineer for RCA for 30 years, until his retirement; Jan. 12. Known as “Tom,” he worked in project management for NASA’s Spacelab while at RCA.

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1969
Dr. Roberto Franco-Saenz GM’69, Toledo, Ohio, April 17, 2004. He was associated with the Medical College of Ohio.

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1970
Hernan A. Floyd WG’70, Augusta, Ga., Aug. 21.

Dr. Michael A. Glatt V’70, Portland, Ore., a veterinarian and the owner of Capitol Hill Animal Hospital; Dec. 10. In 2000 he was appointed to the Veterinary Disciplinary Review Board for the state of Oregon. Dr. Glatt volunteered many hours of public service to low and no-cost spay and neuter clinics. He served as a captain in the U.S. Army in Thailand during the Vietnam War.

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1971
Dr. Ivan D. Ancell GD’71, Hayward, Calif., a periodontist; Nov. 11.

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1972
William C. Crooks C’71 G’71 WG’74 L’75, a managing director with Morgan Joseph and Co., a New York-based investment banking firm; Greenwich, Conn., Nov. 14. He began his career as an attorney with Winthrop Stimson Putnam & Roberts in New York before moving to the financial services business. After moving to Connecticut in 1977, he joined The Historical Society of the Town of Greenwich and served as president of the group from 1996 to 1998 and as chair from 1998 to 2004. And he was a member of numerous other historical societies. He served on the board of The Lawrenceville School and was a former president of the school’s alumni association. He was also on the board of the Yale Alumni Association of Greenwich.

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1976
Dr. Samuel W. Golden C’76, Washington, a physician; Nov. 2.

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1978
Jacqueline M. Calimer WEv’78 WEv’85, Philadelphia, Aug. 26.

Eric A. Kirkland W’78, Washington, June 21, 2004.

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1982
Dr. Harold B. Goldman M’82, Cambridge, Mass., a neurologist; Dec. 3. After serving as a physician with Harvard Community Health Plan, he opened a private neurology practice in Athol, Mass., during the late 1990s. Known as a physician who was personally invested in his patients, he attended an underserved rural population as a staff physician at Heywood Hospital and Athol Memorial Hospital, which named a sleep lab after him. Dr. Goldman developed an annotated and referenced casebook dealing with HIV and the nervous system, a work that is used by doctors for teaching purposes. A passionate lover of nature, he supported the Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust and aided in the group’s successful effort to protect Tully Mountain in Massachusetts.

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1983
Richard G. Buckley GAr’83
, Seattle, a partner at NBBJ, an architectural firm in Seattle; Jan. 2.

1985
Linda E. Feinne-Roth W’85, New York, a former vice president and head of the international asset back security division of J.P. Morgan; Oct. 3. She was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

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1986
Dr. Mitchell R. Gropper C’86
, Highland, Ind., a neurosurgeon; December.

1988
Lori A. Lopez WG’88
, Albany, Calif., Dec. 26, 2000.

Dr. Bernard L. Rossier GrD’88, Myerstown, Pa., a retired dentist; Jan. 28, 2004.

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1989
Suzanne R. McGeorge GAr’89
, Chagrin Falls, Ohio, Sept. 18, 2003.

1992
Dr. Arlene Herzberg GM’92
, Urbana, Ill., a physician; Oct. 6. She had worked in the pathology department of the Carle Clinic Association.

Stephanie R. Williams C’92, Brooklyn, N.Y., a magazine journalist and novelist; July 3. She was a senior writer at SmartMoney and contributing editor at Teen People. She also wrote for New York, Men’s Health, and Glamour, among other publications. Earlier she was a staff writer at Self and TV Guide. In 2002 the National Headliner Awards named her a runner-up for magazine feature writing for her articles in SmartMoney. Her novel, Enter Sandman, was published by McWitty Press in 2004; 30% of the book’s profits go toward breast cancer research. [See “Writing for Her Life,” Sept./Oct. 2004 and “Duly Noted,” Sept./Oct. 1999.]

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2001
Dr. Roberta L. Campbell Gr’01
, Silver Spring, Md., Nov. 14.

2003
Carol A. Caldwell CGS’03
, Philadelphia, June 15, 2001.

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Faculty & Staff

Dr. Richard H. Driscoll. See Class of 1940.

Dr. Richard A. Winchester, West Chester, Pa., the retired director of speech and hearing services at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and an associate professor at the School of Medicine; Dec. 2. He was an audiologist with a group of ear, nose, and throat doctors in Philadelphia for five years before joining the staff at Children’s Hospital in 1963. Before the advent of sophisticated diagnostic equipment, Dr. Winchester devised a test involving an infant’s eye response to help determine the cause of a hearing problem, according to one of his sons, Anthony R. Winchester L’82. He retired in the mid-1980s. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Signal Intelligence Corps in Europe. He was wounded twice by shrapnel and awarded a Purple Heart. His son said that his father became interested in the properties of sound while deciphering code and translating German radio transmissions. He was passionately devoted to opera, especially Wagner.


©2005 The Pennsylvania Gazette
Last modified 05/03/05

 

 

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