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May|June 2007

1910

1922

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Faculty & Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1922

Henry G. Nachman W’22, Camp Hill, Pa., Dec. 9, 2003.

Dr. Samuel J. Sperling C’26 M’29, Los Angeles, Feb. 2006.


1928

Ira Kaufman W’28, Beverly Hills, Calif., Oct. 13.

Edna Stricker King WEF’28, Mechanicsburg, Pa., Sept. 3.


1929

Sadye Hoffman Finestone Ed’29, Greenbrae, Calif., the retired chief operating officer of Superior Chemicals; Nov. 3. Her daughter is Judith Finestone Erdberg CW’68.

Morton Wolf W’29 WG’32, Wyncote, Pa., Oct. 25.


1930

Kenneth Wray Conners W’30 G’32, Gwynedd, Pa., the retired director of public relations at Leeds & Northrup Co., where he had worked for 40 years; Sept. 10. He was the advertising manager from 1947 to 1971, and the PR director from 1971 until his retirement in 1974. He had been a visiting lecturer in the University’s journalism department. Long active at the First United Methodist Church of Germantown, he served at various times as lay leader, trustee, chair of the administrative council, and chair of the pastor-parish relations committee. He also chaired the finance and communications committees. As a lay theologian he preached in many churches in the U.S. and Canada, and the American Church in London. The author of several books, he wrote articles and book reviews for religious publications in the U.S. and abroad. He was a founding member and for 12 years board president of Covenant House Health Services in Germantown. He also served as vice president of the YMCA there and the Delaware Valley Science Council. Earlier he had chaired the junior committee of the Philadelphia Orchestra and had been board president of the Kirkridge Retreat and Study Center in Bangor, Pa.

Frederick L. Hunter WEF’30, Reading, Pa., July 15.

Lowell J. Stevens WEF’30, Clarks Summit, Pa., 2005.


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1931

Margaret Baker Adams Ed’31, Lawrenceville, N.J., Nov.20, 2005.

Esther Read DeSantis NTS’31, Naples, Fla., Feb. 14, 2006.


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1932

Ralph W. Bailey WEF’32, Dennis, Mass., Jan. 28, 2006.

William E. Harrison Jr. W’32, Cherry Hill, N.J., June 28, 2005.

Esther R. Hitchner NTS’32, Salisbury, Md., Aug. 21, 2005.


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1933

Earl L. Cahan W’33 L’37, Philadelphia, Oct. 21.

Nelson H. Downs W’33, Stratford, Conn., May 28, 2005.

Herbert M. Gustow W’33, Philadelphia, October. He had worked for the family business of Morris Gustow & Co., and had earlier served in the U.S. Army in the Pacific.

Dr. Sigmund B. Lichterman C’33 D’34, Coconut Creek, Fla., Sept. 10.


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1934

Edward I. Cutler C’34 L’37, Dover, Fla., Oct. 4.

Robert N. Nathanson WEv’34, Philadelphia, Oct. 24.

Dr. Tyrrell R. Seager M’34, W. Jordan, Utah, a retired physician; Sept. 8. After being the first doctor to receive a medical residency from a hospital in the state of Utah, he opened his practice in 1936. For the next 10 years he was associated with the International Smelting & Refining Co.: Six years at Rio Tinto Copper Mine in Elk County, Nev., and four at Bingham Canyon, Utah. In 1946 he moved to Vernal, Utah, where he practiced for the next 30 years, in general, industrial, and surgical services. Active in the Boy Scouts and community affairs, he served as a board member and officer of numerous organizations and on various medical committees and boards. In 1976 he was honorary president of the Utah State Medical Association. His knowledge of the wilderness, wildlife, and the natural sciences led him to host many field trips for the Uintah Mountain Club. He helped with the designation of the Flaming Gorge-Uintahs National Scenic Byway and the Vernal Steinaker Trail. In 2003 he and his wife, Dorothy, donated the major cost for a replica of an Allosaurus, which was placed outside the Utah Field House of Natural History in Vernal. Dr. Seager was a descendant of George Soule, a passenger on the Mayflower, and seven original Utah Pioneers.

Mildred S. Smyser Ed’34 SW’61, Greenville, Ohio, June 4, 2006.


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1935

Robert D. Barnhart W’35, Fairfield, Conn., March 22, 2005.

Dr. John A. Fritchey Jr. M’35, Harrisburg, Pa., August.

Leon M. Germanow W’35, Rochester, N.Y., Sept. 18, 2005.

Edna Diehl MacNair Ed’35 GEd’48, Glen Mills, Pa., Dec. 5, 2005.

Bernyce White Williams Ed’35, Richmond, Va., Aug. 27, 2004.

1936

Dr. Edwin C. Dreby III ChE’36, Medford, N.J., Sept. 17.

Dr. Maurice B. Gordon C’36, Voorhees, N.J., a physician who practiced in Ventnor from 1941 until his retirement in 1976; Nov. 19. Also known as a medical historian, he wrote two books,: Aesulaplus Comes to the Colonies: The Story of the Early Days of Medicine in the Thirteen Original Colonies (1949) and Naval and Maritime Medicine During the American Revolution (1978).

Rosalie P. Leary DH’36, Norristown, Pa., a retired dental hygienist; October. From 1945 until 1963 she was the hygienist at Roland Elementary School in Radnor. She then went to work for her brother Joseph, a dentist in Conshohocken, until her retirement in 1982. She was a founding member, in 1962, of the women’s guild of the St. Raphaela Center for the Handmaids of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, a religious order in Haverford.

Frank Morell Jr. W’36, Sandy, Ore., March 25, 2004.


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1937

Edward Cohen L’37, Philadelphia, a bankruptcy attorney in the city for 60 years, until his retirement in 2005; Sept. 17. He was known as “the dean of bankruptcy practice in Philadelphia,” said his associate, William M. Labkoff L’65. And he represented a lot of debtors for free, according to his family. During World War II he was a tank commander for the U.S. Army in Europe, attaining the rank of major.

Dr. Joseph Lachman M’37 GM’55, Wynnewood, Pa., July 24, 2005.

Martha Burkhart Miller Ed’37 GEd’38, Havertown, Pa., Nov. 18. At Penn she received an award for pottery and was elected to Pi Lambda Theta, an education sorority. In later years she served on the steering committee of her class. She had taught physical education and art briefly.

Dr. Laura Ehrlich Morrow M’37, West Orange, N.J., a retired psychiatrist and physician who helped advance the cause for women in medicine; Jan. 13, 2004. During World War II she practiced as the only physician in Lyndhurst, N.J., with all the male doctors serving in the armed forces overseas: She delivered babies, performed surgeries, and treated all types of illnesses. As a Red Cross volunteer, she instructed the general public in emergency health care. She later practiced in Rutherford, Passaic, and Clifton, N.J., where she was former director of psychiatry and senior attending physician at Passaic General Hospital. She served on the staffs of Beth Israel and St. Mary’s hospital, also in Passaic, before retiring in the early 1990s. She and her husband, the late Dr. J. Lloyd Morrow, worked to help mentally ill people remain functioning and with their families as long and as much as possible. According to the American Medical Women’s Association (AMWA), they were pioneers in the use of electroshock therapy and electroencephalography. They also pioneered uses of psychotropic medications and were researchers in trial studies of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3) in the treatment of schizophrenia and the anti-psychotic drug Fluphenazine. She served on the first Agent Orange Commission to investigate the effects of exposure on members of the armed forces and their families. Dr. Morrow was a distinguished Life Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, a Fellow of the American Geriatric Society, president of the New Jersey Psychiatric Association, and the first woman president for the Society of Clinical Psychiatrists of Northern New Jersey. Her many honors include the New Jersey Medical Women’s Association Woman of the Year award in 1968 and the AMWA’s Elizabeth Blackwell medal, for her innovative ideas, public relations efforts, and leadership. In 1988-89 she was included in the exhibit at UNDNJ-George Smith Library in Newark, Pioneer Women Physicians of New Jersey. Untiring in her efforts to advance the cause for women in medicine, she actively campaigned and created mentorship programs for medical students and others. She was instrumental in the development of the film Resolved—Medicine Needs More Women. She was involved with the AMWA in the creation of the Elizabeth Blackwell U.S. postage stamp honoring women in medicine. In 1976 Dr. Morrow was inducted into The Douglass Society of Douglass College, Rutgers, for her distinguished contributions as a physician and psychiatrist, and for her efforts to encourage and assist women in entering the field of medicine. Also an artist, she exhibited paintings and drawings throughout her life and was supportive of efforts to include the arts in medical school curricula. Some of her later work was exhibited in the annual UNDNJ-NJMS spring arts festival, “A Celebration of Art, Medicine, and Life—Overcoming Adversity through the Arts.”

Julian B. Slevin Jr. C’37, Stone Harbor, N.J., Nov. 20.


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1938

R. Murray Hoffman W’38, Wayne, Pa., Oct. 3, 2003.

Dr. Joseph W. Stayman Jr. C’38, Hartwick, N.Y., Nov. 2.


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1939

Thomas R. Bevan L’39, Wayne, Pa., a retired partner at the Philadelphia law firm of Duane Morris, where he had worked for more than 50 years; Oct. 25. He was still working for corporate clients, including Elk Mountain Ski Resort, well into his 80s, according to his daughter, Sherrie. He had served as a rector’s warden and chair of the search committee at St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church in Gladwyne, Pa. During World War II he was a U.S. Navy intelligence officer in the Pacific.

Helen Crane Greene GEd’39, Yeadon, Pa., September.

William W. Hindman Jr. W’39, St. Petersburg, Fla., July 19.

Alfred L. Reeser L’39, Malvern, Pa., a manufacturer’s representative for restaurant-equipment companies for more than 30 years; Sept. 12. An avid horseman who rode and owned horses until age 70, he was a longtime member of the Radnor Hunt Club. He was also a tennis enthusiast, playing well into his 70s. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in Germany.

Priscilla Clayden Traynor CW’39, West Grove, Pa., Aug. 16. At Penn she was a member of Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority, in which she remained active for 69 years. A docent at Winterthur, she maintained the archives at Jenner’s Pond Retirement Community, where she lived.

Robert W. Trout GEd’39, Honey Brook, Pa., a teacher in both the private and public school sectors, until his retirement in 1977; Nov. 8. For 20 years he taught third and fourth graders at Roberts School in Wayne. He previously taught at Episcopal Academy in Merion and was an administrator at William Penn Charter School in Philadelphia. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps Division and taught illiterate soldiers to read and write. Later he helped run a military hospital in occupied Japan.

Bradford J. Walker W’39, Bayonet Point, Fla., a retired teacher; Dec. 2, 2005. During World War II he served in the U.S. Air Force.

Raymond C. Webb C’39, Philadelphia, Nov. 2005.


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1940

Thomas U. Crary W’40, Fargo, N.D., Nov. 2, 2005.

H. Francis DeLone L’40, Gladwyne, Pa., a Philadelphia lawyer for more than 60 years; Nov. 22. He was a partner and served a term as chair of Dechert law firm in the city. Several times he argued cases successfully before the U.S. Supreme Court. Although he officially retired in 1982, he maintained an office at the firm and continued to practice until the late 1990s, according to his family. He was past president of the United Cerebral Palsy Association and of the United Way of Southeastern Pennsylvania. He served on the boards of the Friends Neighborhood Guild and Philadelphia Academies Inc. During World War II he served in the U.S. Marine Corps, Stateside.

Robert M. Edmiston W’40, Madison, Conn., Sept. 29. At Penn he played football and was president of both the senior class and Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He was also a member of the Sphinx Society and was the Cane Man for his Class. During World War II he served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. His wife is Louise Humbrecht Edmiston Ed’37 An endowed scholarship has been established in his name at the University.

Barton E. Ferst W’40 L’44, Philadelphia, July 30.

William A. Marquard W’40, Lexington, Ky., former chief executive officer of American Standard Co., which he revitalized during the 1970s and 1980s; Oct. 22. After graduating from Wharton he briefly played semipro baseball; as a pitcher he was known for his fork ball. He then joined Westinghouse Electric Co., where his assignments included operating a plant in Washington, making battleship guns, and running a consumer-products plant in Mexico. In 1952, as a supervisor at Mosler Safe Co., he helped install the system at the National Archives that once lowered the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution into vaults for safekeeping every night. According to The Wall Street Journal, he traveled to Nevada for tests of whether enormous vault doors, designed to protect government leaders in the old West Virginia shelter, could withstand a nuclear blast. He became president of Mosler in 1966, shortly before it was acquired by American Standard. He was transferred to the American Standard’s New York office in 1969 and in 1971 was unexpectedly named chief executive officer. His major assignment was to reduce the company’s debt, which in five years had climbed from $21 million to $426 million. Within eight years he reduced the debt by more than half and substantially increased profits, according to a 1980 report in Fortune magazine, allowing him to boast that “one out of every five bathrooms in the free world is ours.” That same year Dun’s Review voted American Standard one of the country’s five best-managed companies. In 1984, after more than a decade of restructuring, he acquired Trane Co., which expanded American Standard into air conditioning, braking, suspension, and transmission systems for large vehicles. Known for his back-to-basics management approach and his strong work ethic, he prided himself on never missing a day of work as CEO, because—as colleague Frank Nickell remembered—“he believed that that was what you were supposed to do if you were the leader.” After retiring in 1985 he remained a board member and helped American Standard go private in a leveraged buyout with Kelso & Co. to avoid a hostile takeover by Black & Decker Corp. He served on the boards of Chemical Bank, Shell Oil Co., and New York Life Insurance Co. He also raised horses and cattle near Lexington, Ky., including the racehorse Aly’s Alley, which finished second in the 1998 Breeders’ Cup for two-year-olds. He supported cancer research at the University of Kentucky and backed a small health-care company working to prevent heart disease. A trustee of Transylvania University in Lexington, he served on its executive committee and donated nearly $2 million for the school’s baseball stadium, which was named for him.

George L. Miller Jr. WG’40, Radnor, Pa., a history and English teacher at Chestnut Hill Academy in Philadelphia, until his retirement in 1985; Oct. 7. He was known as “Woody.” Earlier he had worked for his family’s business, Lester Pianos, for more than 15 years, until its closing in 1963. Partial to writing and research, he wrote histories of Deer Isle, Maine, his longtime summer home, and of Skidaway Island, Ga., where he lived for eight years after retiring. During World War II he served Stateside in the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, a Pennsylvania Army National Guard unit founded in 1774.

Howard G. Neill ChE’40, Elmhurst, Ill., Aug. 27.

Dr. Herbert Richman C’40 V’42, Bronx, N.Y., Sept. 6.

C. Daniel Shelburne WG’40, Southern Pines, N.C., Oct. 17.

Elizabeth Forster Stephenson CW’40, Sea Island, Ga., July 3.

John S. Toothill W’40, Nags Head, N.C., an industrial engineer and general foreman for the American Steel and Wire Division of the U.S. Steel Corp. in Trenton, N.J., until his retirement in 1972; July 8. A serious collector of American folk art, he became an acknowledged authority on American duck decoys in his retirement. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy, aboard the U.S.S. Winooski; he was the ship’s communications officer when it was torpedoed during the invasion of North Africa. He then served as executive officer on the U.S.S. Fremont in the South Pacific and participated in the invasion of Saipan, Palau, Leyte, Luzon, and Iwo Jima. He achieved the rank of lieutenant commander and was awarded the Bronze Star, among other military honors.

Dr. Albert H. Voegele M’40, Mansfield, Ohio, a physician who had practiced for 59 years, until his retirement in 1999; Aug. 28.


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1941

Dr. James L. Cullather WG’41, South Bend, Ind., a retired professor at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana; April 22, 2004.

Dr. Frank Eisenberg Ch’41 Gr’51, Bethesda, Md., Aug. 30.

Dr. Morton M. Halpern M’41 GM’45, Boca Raton, Fla., July.

George W. Harman W’41, Cloverdale, Calif., March 14, 2006.

William M. Hess W’41, Haddonfield, N.J., a stockbroker who founded two brokerage firms in Philadelphia; Sept. 19. He began his career as a stockbroker at Reynolds & Co. in Philadelphia. He then worked with his father at Hess, Blizzard & Co., also in the city. Together they started a new firm, Woodcock, Hess & Co., Inc., which became the first agency to establish a corporate membership with the New York Stock Exchange in 1953, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer. In 1959 he founded, on his own, Hess, Grant & Remington in Philadelphia, which later became Hess, Grant & Co. He served on the board of governors of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange and was a founding board member of SGL Industries in Westville. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy.

Dr. Donald R. Kindschi M’41, Sauk City, Wis., a physician until his retirement in 1979; May 11, 2006. He practiced in California for nine years before accepting a position teaching anesthesiology at a college in India from 1956 to 1961. He then worked at hospitals for Appalachian coal miners in Kentucky for several years and ended his career at the Veterans Hospital in Madison, Wis., in 1979. Earlier he had worked briefly for the Soil Conservation Service. Active in the Nature Conservancy, he received its highest honor, the Oak Leaf Award.

N. Veryl McElroy W’41, Gloucester, Va., July 22.

Irving Mendelson W’41, Floral Park, N.Y., retired head of the old Townley Manufacturing Co., a textile-converting firm in Manhattan; Dec. 3. One of the famous Munger Men, he played varsity football for Penn and earned national recognition as an outstanding guard in 1938, 1939, and 1940. He was a member of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity. During the Second World War he served with the U.S. Army (106th Infantry), and survived the Battle of the Bulge; taken prisoner early in the counter-offensive, he spent six months in a POW camp in Germany. An active member of the Penn Club of Long Island, Irv Mendelson recruited many student athletes for the University, several of whom went on to distinction at Penn and in the wider world; he also established the club’s coach-of-the-year award, that helped build Penn’s reputation in the area. He was founding chair of the Class of 1941 Reunion Gift Committee. He established the Mendelson Room in the William White Training House in memory of his first wife, Gloria, and he was a noted donor to the George Munger Endowment Fund. Irv Mendelson was honored with Penn’s Alumni Award of Merit in 1998. One of his granddaughters is Mara Wishingrad C’10; they would often sit together talking about Penn—where his dorm room was and where hers is, and how the campus had changed and how it has not.

Dr. Robert W. Nichols V’41, Skaneateles, N.Y., June 30, 2006.

Robert F. Sinclair W’41, Portland, Ore., Feb. 28, 2006.

Dr. Alvin V. Thomas Sr. PH’41, Philadelphia, a doctor in the region for more than 40 years; Oct. 25. He was a general practitioner in Philadelphia, 1945-50, then moved his practice to Paulsboro, N.J., where he worked from 1950 to 1963. He returned to Philadelphia to work in the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in psychiatric services, first in Coatesville and then in West Philadelphia, until his retirement in 1979. “He was a man who came up in a period when there was a lot of segregation and, despite the repressive nature of prejudice, persisted and endured and in many ways prospered,” said his son, Dr. Alvin V. Thomas Jr. C’62. A member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity for more than 35 years, the elder Dr. Thomas was an active contributor to college funds for underprivileged students. During World War II he worked as a physician for the U.S. Army and was stationed in a segregated camp at Fort Huachuca, Ariz.

Rosalie Magen Weinstein CW’41, Merion, Pa., Sept. 12.


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1942

John D. Bakke WEv’42, Lancaster, Pa., the secretary and treasurer of Masland Duraleather Co. in Kensington, Pa., until his retirement in 1975; Sept. 2. He had worked for the firm, which manufactured vinyl fabric, for 40 years. Until 1990 he was a trustee and secretary and treasurer of the Charles and Annette Masland Foundation, which funds religious organizations. He was a longtime member of Trinity United Methodist Church in Philadelphia, where he served as church financial secretary and a Sunday school teacher. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy in the Great Lakes area.

Dr. Alan W. Bernheimer Gr’42, New York, Jan. 3, 2006.

Chester A. Borkland WEv’42, Willow Street, Pa., Sept. 19.

John B. Cohen C’42, Orlando, Fla., a music industry entrepreneur; Aug. 23. At Penn he was president of Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity and the Louis Marshall Society (now Hillel), and served on the fraternity board. An accomplished athlete, he received numerous medals in track and field at the Penn Relays and National AAU Championships. As a lineman on the football team, he won an honorable mention as an All-American Offensive and Defensive Tackle, and played in the 1941 Blue-Grey game. “He was extremely proud to be one of the Munger Men,” recalled his family. Throughout his career in the music industry he owned several record distributorships and over 50 retail record stores countrywide. He was a pioneer in promoting large-venue rock concerts in the 1960s and 1970s. And he became a leader in the nationwide battle against record piracy. He was a former president of the National Recording Merchandisers Association and the Black Music Association. Devoted to the Boy Scouts, he was president of the Northeast Ohio Council and received the Silver Beaver Award. He enjoyed attending Penn reunions and the Penn Relays. During World War II he served as a major in the U.S. Marine Corps, participating in the invasions of Namur, Saipan, and Tinian; he was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for saving the lives of four sailors from drowning during a typhoon off the Kwajalien Atol. His wife, Charlotte Katz Cohen Mu’43, whom he met on the steps of the Furness Library, died in Dec. 2004. (See Gazette, “Obituaries,” May-June 2005.) Two of his sons are Dr. Peter R. Cohen C’70 and Douglas J. Cohen C’78 GAr’81, who is married to Teri Gross Cohen C’78 GEd’79.

William I. English Sr. WEv’42, Blue Bell, Pa., a retired plumbing and heating contractor; Oct. 28. Until his retirement in 1988, he worked for Irwin H. English Co., the plumbing and heating firm his grandfather established in Philadelphia in 1879. For 20 years he served on the Springfield Township (Montgomery County) zoning board. A volunteer with the Oreland Boy Scout Troop 1, he built its Hawk Mountain campsite. He was past council president of the Monday morning men’s maintenance group at Christ’s Evangelical Lutheran Church in Oreland. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy in Puerto Rico. One of his sons is William I. English Jr. W’68.

Leonard B. Gordon W’42 L’48, Narberth, Pa., Oct. 21. His wife is Tamara Steerman Gordon FA’53 G’75.

Glenn E. Miller Jr. G’42, Mechanicsburg, Pa., Dec. 18, 2004. His wife, Dr. Marcia Kelley Miller Gr’50, died Sept. 5, 2006.

Raymond F. Valentine WG’42, Wyncote, Pa., Dec. 29, 2005.

Sherman L. Wagman W’42, Ventnor, N.J., Sept. 15.

Dr. Robert C. Walden Jr. M’42, Manchester, Conn., an obstetrician and gynecologist there for forty years; Aug. 18. During World War II and after he served in the U.S. Navy for six years (1942-48). From 1943 to 1945 he was a medical officer aboard the destroyer U.S.S. Ludlow; he earned three battle stars.

Robert M. Woletz W’42 WG’43, Columbia, Md., Dec. 2, 2005.


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1943

Robert C. Beinbrink W’43, Hilton Head, S.C., a retired principal in the Beinbrink Paper Co. of Floral Park, N.Y.; Sept. 18. He also worked for Westvaco Paper. At Penn he was a member of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity, the Friars Society, Kite and Key, Scabbard and Blade, Army ROTC, and the Varsity Crew Club. He was one of the early members of the Congregational Church of Manhasset, N.Y., and chaired its board of deacons for a time. He was founder of the Manhasset Joggers and active in the Boy Scouts, Rotary, Masons and the YMCA. While in Hilton Head he rediscovered his love of rowing and joined the Palmetto Rowing Club. During World War II he was a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army Air Force, assigned to the Pacific command in the Philippines, for which he received military honors. His son-in-law is Charles A. Gilman W’71, whose sons are Peter H. Gilman C’00 GPU’01 and Douglas B. Gilman C’03.

Dr. Morton C. Chase C’43, Philadelphia, a dentist on South Broad Street for 50 years; Nov. 7.

J. Allison Cochran W’43, Southampton, Pa., Aug. 30.

Edward A. Kirk W’43, Keystone Heights, Fla., March 2, 2005.

Rosalyn Persky Lutin DH’43, Newtown, Conn., May 28, 2003.

Louis H. Meyer W’43, Doylestown, Pa., president of Associated Mortgage Co., until his retirement in 1981; Oct. 11. At Penn he was a member of Pi Lambda Phi. As a student he cast a crucial vote to unify the Jewish and Christian fraternity councils into a single council. After beginning his career at Bamberger’s, he joined fraternity brother Jay Kislak W’43, at Kislak Inc. in the real estate and mortgage finance industry. He then went on to Associate Mortgage, a pioneering national lending institution, eventually becoming president. In retirement he joined his son Thomas H. Meyer G’86 WG’86, in running a large farming operation in Bucks County: they grew soybeans, wheat, barley, and corn at Kirkland Farm for 12 years. And he continued to serve on the boards of numerous hospitals, colleges, and companies. A lifelong Penn enthusiast, he served as president of his alumni class and received the Alumni Award of Merit in 1982. His brother is B. Robert Meyer W’39 and his granddaughters are Kristin Meyer C’00 and Alison K. Malmon C’03.

Col. John B. Moyar M’43, Fort Garland, Colo., a neurosurgeon who had served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War; Aug. 20. At Penn he was a member of the Phi Chi medical fraternity. His last post was at Darnall Army Community Hospital in Fort Hood, Tex., where he retired in 1973 as a colonel, military commander in charge of the hospital, and chief of neurosurgery service.

Everett H. Murray, Jr. Ch’43, Chesterbrook, Pa., Sept. 26.

Julian R. Steuer W’43, Beachwood, Ohio, Dec. 11, 2005.


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1944

A. Douglas Dalton W’44, Niceville, Fla., Aug. 30.

Dr. Kenneth E. Diehl V’44, Northumberland, Pa., a retired veterinarian; Sept. 2. He established private veterinary practices in Northumberland and Sunbury, Pa., and then worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Pittsburgh and Harrisburg until his retirement. At the U.S.D.A. he worked to eradicate diseases in farm animals and studied the links between nutrition and health. Dr. Diehl also developed a nutritional software program in the 1980s. He served on the board of the Northumberland National Bank and on the church council at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Northumberland. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army.

Dr. Richard C. Guise V’44, Elizabethtown, Pa., June 5, 2006.

Marjorie Trasoff Stewart CW’44, Narberth, Pa., Sept. 17. Her husband is Dr. George G. Stewart D’44.

Naomi Nakano Tanaka CW’44, St. Louis, Nov. 5. Her role in overturning Penn’s policy during World War II of excluding Japanese Americans from admission was recounted in “Admission Denied,” in the Jan|Feb 2000 Gazette (www.upenn.edu/gazette/0100). Her daughter is Marilyn J. Tanaka CW’74. Naomi’s sister is Teru Nakano Graves CW’50 G’51, whose husband is Richard L. Graves C’52; their son is Richard N. Graves C’73.

Harold H. Trulear C’44, Media, Pa., Sept. 30.


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1945

Evelyn Kimbell Binter Ed’45 GEd’46, Moorestown, N.J., Oct. 4.

Philip L. Blumenthal Jr. W’45, Indianapolis, a management consultant and former partner in Geo. S. Olive & Co.; April 28, 2006. While at Penn he joined the NROTC program in Sept. 1942; he went on to serve a total of 33 years in the U.S. Navy Reserve, including five years of active duty, retiring as a captain; he had commanded various units in central Indiana.

Charles S. Fischer W’45, West Chester, Pa., a retired accountant; July 31. After working for accountants in Philadelphia, he partnered with the late Henry F. Sanville Jr. W’38 to establish Sanville & Fischer, an accounting firm in West Chester, which later merged with Maillie, Falconiero & Co. He retired in the 1990s. He was past president of the Adirondack League Club and past president and treasurer of the St. Andrew’s Society of Philadelphia. While at Penn he joined the NROTC program in Sept. 1942; he went on to serve in the U.S. Navy towards the end of World War II, and served again during the Korean War. He was stationed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and in the Mediterranean.


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1946

Fred H. Law Jr. WG’46 L’49, Elmhurst, Ill., Sept. 20.

Nancy Schmidt McDowell DH’46, Madison, Miss., April 16, 2006.

Dr. David L. Miller M’46, Chautauqua, N.Y., Sept. 12.


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1947

Ernest A. Alexas W’47, Pompano Beach, Fla., July 23, 2004.

Gorman R. Armstrong C’47, Clinton, Pa., Aug. 15, 2003.

Audrey Lee M. Baldino DH’47, Norristown, Pa., Nov. 16.

Robert E. Gallagher WEF’47, Clarks Summit, Pa., a licensed realtor with John J. Lavelle Real Estate for more than 30 years; Sept. 5. He was previously employed by the Williams Bakery Co., where he was president and business agent for the Bakery Confectionary Union Local 53. He was also a licensed life-insurance agent for Metropolitan Life. He was a longtime board member of the Scranton Roman Catholic Diocese Social Services and a board member of Lackawanna Housing Development Corp., of which he was a co-founder. An active member of Our Lady of the Snows Church, he was among the first group of diocesan Eucharistic ministers commissioned there. He was an organizing member of the church’s men’s club in which he had held several offices. And he was a past president of the Holy Name Society. During World War II he served as a staff sergeant in the U.S. Marine Corps in the Asiatic Pacific Theater, for which he received several medals and awards.

Rev. Robert T. Holt W’47, Deptford, N.J., Jan. 25, 2006.

George R. Kessler W’47, Jenkintown, Pa., owner of the former Germantown Fire Proof Storage Co.; Sept. 21. He was a past president of the Jenkintown Lions Club. During World War II he served in the U.S. Marine Corps.

Bernard L. Lifshutz W’47, Paris, Sept. 18, 2004.

Dr. John A. Munroe Gr’47, Wilmington, Del., Sept. 6.


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1948

Robert F. Agne WG’48, Grosse Pointe, Mich., June 6, 2004.

John A. Clark L’48, Blue Bell, Pa., an attorney with the Philadelphia law firm of Duane Morris from 1970 until his retirement in 1988; Oct. 15. Earlier he had been a lawyer with firms in New York and Reading, Pa., and was counsel to the Internal Revenue Service in New York. He was the author of several professional articles and the handbook, “How to Save Time and Taxes Handling Estates.” He was vice chair of the American Bar Association trusts and estates committee, 1988-89. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army, Stateside and in Japan.

Harry W. Neinstedt W’48, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., June 14, 2006.

Dr. Harold E. Pierce Jr. GM’48, Philadelphia, a dermatologist and cosmetic surgeon in the Philadelphia area for more than 50 years; Oct. 25. In the late 1940s he was chief of dermatology at the former Mercy-Douglas Hospital and at Holmesburg Prison. He specialized in microdermabrasion, treated complex skin disorders, and performed cosmetic surgery and hair transplants. During the 1950s he founded West Park Clinic in West Philadelphia, a dermatological practice that focused on African Americans. In the early 1980s he founded Pierce Cosmetic Surgery Center in Bala Cynwyd, Pa., where he participated in some of the first liposuction procedures on African Americans. He eventually moved his practice to the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, before retiring in 2005. In 1982 he edited the book Cosmetic Plastic Surgery in Nonwhite Patients. For 17 years, beginning in the early 1980s, Dr. Pierce traveled to Washington several times a week to teach dermatology surgery at Howard University Medical School; he also taught dermatology at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. In 2003 the National Medical Association honored him with a Lifetime Achievement Award. A member of the Philadelphia Continental Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution, he was a descendant of Adam Pierce, an African American soldier who fought in the Revolutionary War. Dr. Pierce served in the U.S. Army Air Corps, 1951-54. As a captain, he was head of dermatology at the 1600th U.S. Air Force Hospital at Westover Air Force Base in Massachusetts. He remained a member of the Reserve until retiring in 1976; in 1987 he was promoted to brigadier general while in retirement. “He logged more than 3,800 hours in civilian and military aircraft,” said one of his daughters, Tamara. He also contributed to Black Americans in Military Aviation, a traveling exhibit that was displayed in one of the Air Force museums.


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1949

Doris Smead Abson Ed’49 GEd’56, Williamsport, Pa., Sept. 14.

Dr. Sibyl Schwartz Cohen CW’49, Philadelphia, an adjunct professor of philosophy at La Salle University and Rutgers University, from 1970 until her retirement in 2005; Nov. 1. For more than 20 years she was active in the union for part-time faculty at Rutgers. Earlier she had worked as a legal secretary. During the 1960s she became active in Great Books, a national organization that encourages people to read and form groups to discuss literature. Recently she served on the steering committee of One Book, One Philadelphia, a citywide reading program. Her nephew is Dr. Jonathan Reuben Cohen Gr’91.

Carl G. Crowder Jr. WG’49, Madison, N.J., April 19, 2004.

Donald H. Grubb C’49, Cary, N.C., the retired president and chief executive officer of the Huyck Corp.; Oct. 13. At Penn he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa honor society. He began his career at the U.S. Treasury Department in Washington, where he worked from 1949 to 1957. In 1953 he received the Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his work at the Treasury; in 1957 the William A. Jump Memorial Foundation gave him the Meritorious Award for Exemplary Achievement in Public Administration. He went on to work for Westvaco Paper Co. in New York and Hoboken, N.J., and then for Huyck Corp. in Nova Scotia and Tennessee. He became president and CEO of Huyck in 1973 and moved the corporate headquarters to Wake Forest, N.C. After retiring in 1981, he established a management-consulting business, serving companies in the U.S. and Europe. He also served as a director for a number of companies in the U.S. and U.K., including the Raleigh branch of Wachovia Bank, Morganite, Inc., and the National Electric Carbon Co. In retirement he developed and taught for seven years a seminar program in management at the Business School at Campbell University. Supportive of higher education, he established scholarship funds at North Carolina State University, Campbell University, and West Chester University in Pennsylvania. He was a former chair of the North Carolina World Trade Association and former president of the Friends of North Carolina State University. He served on the boards of numerous community, business, and medical establishments in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Nova Scotia. In 1975 he helped establish the Group of Fifty in the Triangle Area and was its first president; the group remains active today in bringing community leaders together to work for improvements in the area. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army, 1943-46, including service in Europe in the 84th Infantry Division.

Dr. John Hale GEE’49 GrE’57, Denver, emeritus professor of radiology at the University’s School of Medicine and College of Engineering and Applied Science; July 3. He joined the department of radiology at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in 1957 and retired in 1987. During his career at Penn he served on numerous academic and scientific committees, including the Radiation Safety Committee, which he chaired for many years. He served on the American Board of Radiology and the American Board of Health Physics. Dr. Hale was president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), 1961-62, and was on their board of directors, 1958-63. He was the American editor of Physics in Medicine and Biology, 1969-76 and served on the editorial board of the Yearbook of Cancer, 1964-69. He published a book, The Fundamentals of Radiological Science, in 1974, and contributed eight chapters in other books, along with having over forty other publication credits. In 1976 he received a service award from the AAPM. During World War II he was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy for five years, serving as a radar officer aboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Essex. His son is Mark Hale GCP’86.

Elmer W. Heinel Jr. W’49, Chestertown, Md., Aug. 20.

Charles P. Holderbaum ME’49, Penfield, N.Y., Aug. 15.

Dr. Jack B. Jay M’49, Desert Hot Springs, Calif., May 2006.

Dr. Claude R. Joyner Jr. M’49 GM’53, Sewickley, Pa., November.

William C. Kelly WEF’49, Mertztown, Pa., Feb. 14, 2006.

Robert V. Luongo W’49 G’53, Collegeville, Pa., Oct. 24.

Roger Mattes Sr. W’49 L’52, Greentown, Pa., March 17, 2005.

Solomon Myzel MtE’49, Philadelphia, Sept. 13.

Dr. David B. Robinson M’49, Skaneateles, N.Y., July 9.

Earl R. Rose WG’49, Sarasota, Fla., June 2, 2006.

George A. Slossman W’49, Philadelphia, Sept. 14, 2003.

Solomon Sternthal W’49, Delray Beach, Fla., Aug. 3.


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1950

Dr. Bernard D. Blaustein ChE’50, Pittsburgh, former senior scientist in the Office of Project Management at the U.S. Department of Energy; June 25, 2006. He retired in 1993, after 35 years of service. His work focused on coal liquefaction and the reduction of acid rain, promoting coal and other viable alternative fuel sources. He had been a faculty member at Johns Hopkins University, his graduate alma mater, and later served as a volunteer judge for the Pennsylvania Junior Academy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh. In retirement he taught in the Carnegie Science Center Voyager Program. He was the co-author of two books and co-editor of more than 40 publications. He was a 50-year member of Sigma Xi scientific research society and the American Chemical Society, for which he served in various local and national positions, including chairing the Division of Fuel Chemistry in 1977.

Richard L. Holmes Jr. WG’50, Schwenksville, Pa., Nov. 9.

Andrew K. MacBeth W’50, Sarasota, Fla., Sept. 28.

Dr. Marcia Kelley Miller Gr’50, Mechanicsburg, Pa., Sept. 5. Her husband, Glenn E. Miller Jr. G’42, died Dec. 18, 2004.

Dr. Sheppard M. Siegel D’50, Bayside, N.Y., July 28, 2004.

Houston J. Smith W’50, West Chester, Pa., Jan. 16, 2006.

Peter O. Sykora CCC’50, Philadelphia, Sept. 2.

Nathan C. White WG’50, Reading, Mass., Nov. 24, 2005.


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1951

Wilbert S. Anderson Jr. WG’51, St. Albans, Mo., Jan. 23, 2006.

Dr. Winthrop E. Everett Gr’51, Lititz, Pa., a professor of economics and business administration at Franklin and Marshall College from 1946 until his retirement in 1973; Sept. 5. He was a life vestryman at St. John’s Episcopal Church and a former chair of the church finance committee of the Diocese of Central Pennsylvania.

Joseph P. Hoerle III W’51, Philadelphia, Nov. 10.

Louise Clarke Long Nu’51, Green Valley, Ariz., Aug. 12.

Dr. Donald H. Roberts M’51, Palm Bay, Fla., Aug. 5.

Lt.Col. William E. Sexton WG’51, Fairfax, Va., Aug. 10, 2002.

Dr. Richard W. Turner D’51, Wenatchee, Wash., Dec. 29, 2005.

Marjorie Bookout Weest GEd’51, Havertown, Pa., a speech therapist in the Upper Darby School District for 22 years, until her retirement in 1982; Sept. 25. Earlier she had been a school teacher at Marcus Hook School. She served two terms as secretary of the Pennsylvania Association of School Retirees and helped organize the Delaware County chapter. She was a founding member, Retired, of the Pennsylvania State Education Association, and served on the advisory board of Penn State, Delaware County.


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1952

Dr. Seymour L. Brown D’52 GD’57, Allentown, Pa., July 31. His wife is Evelyn Hymowitz Brown Ed’54.

Lucille P. Canuso CW’52 GEd’54, Philadelphia, Jan. 11, 2006.

Dr. Henry G. Cornwell Gr’52, Lincoln University, Pa., professor emeritus of psychology at Lincoln University; Nov. 1. He began his career as an educational adviser for the Civilian Conservation Corps and then worked for the U.S. Office of Censorship in New York. He joined the Lincoln faculty in 1946 and chaired the department of psychology for more than 20 years. He also helped establish the university’s master of human services program. His research, which was published in professional journals, included the study of verbal learning and visual perception. While at Lincoln he was a field assessment officer for the Peace Corps. After retiring in 1980 he continued to consult for the psychology department and served on the Oxford Area school board. Fluent in Spanish, Portuguese, and German, he was also an artist; his watercolors and pastels were exhibited at the Langston Hughes Memorial Library at Lincoln. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army’s 92nd Division in North Africa and Italy.

Thayer Dolan W’52, Columbus, N.J., a mechanical installations manager at the former North American Brass & Aluminum Co. in Philadelphia, until his retirement in the mid-1970s; Oct. 10. Earlier he had been a foreman at the North American Smelting Co. in Wilmington, Del., and then superintendent of daily operations for the North American Marine Salvage Co. in Fieldsboro, Pa. He had served in the merchant marine for several years and worked on oil tankers.

Col. Richard S. Fleming C’52, Brunswick, Maine, Oct. 21, 2005.

Marvin Friedman W’52, New Hope, Pa., Dec. 2002.

Seymour G. Herlich CE’52, Moorestown, N.J., July 1.

Ronald W. McKirdy WG’52, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., Sept. 12, 2005.

Gwat Yong Tan WG’52, Berkeley, Calif., April 17, 2006.

Isaac L. Vanvoorhis W’52, Sarasota, Fla., May 9, 2006.

Hannah Cook Westley CW’52, Tucson, Ariz., Jan. 13, 2005.

Mildred F. Wills Nu’52, Kennett Square, Pa., Sept. 22.


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1953

Thomas J. Burke WEv’53, Newtown Square, Pa., a retired insurance agent for Prudential; Oct. 13.

Dr. George W. Cheek Jr. M’53 GM’60, Burlington, N.C., June 2006.

John A. Connor GEE’53, Centreville, Va., Aug. 6.

Richard W. Emerick WG’53, Stratford, Conn., Aug. 26, 2002.

Dr. Louis A. Ensenat GM’53, New Orleans, July 31, 2005.

Vincent B. Murphy Jr. WG’53, Far Hills, N.J., a former executive managing partner with Salomon Brothers and a senior executive with Merrill Lynch; Oct. 14. He joined Salomon Brothers in 1964 and became a general partner at age 39. Working closely with Bill Salomon, he was responsible for a number of key initiatives that helped the firm develop from a small Wall Street bond house to a major financial institution. He was instrumental in the design and functionality of the trading floor, which became internationally renowned as The Room. He was an executive managing partner for a number of years before leaving Salomon to join Merrill Lynch in 1980, where he was president of Merrill Lynch Capital Resources Inc., and then served as special assistant to the firm. In that role he cultivated the firm’s business relationship with the Vatican and the Holy See, and was successful in implementing major restructurings in order to automate and computerize the complex financial systems of the Roman Catholic Church worldwide. Active within the church, he was anointed a member of the Knights of St. Gregory and the Knights of Malta, including serving on the Board of Councillors. And he was named a Knight of the Holy Sepulchre. He was a board member of the Vatican Museum’s Patrons of the Arts. Passionate about horses, he was a former president of the U.S. Equestrian Team and a former director of both the National Horse Show and the Devon Horse Show. He was a member of the School of Veterinary Medicine’s board of overseers. In his home state of New Jersey, he became the first chair of the Liberty State Park Development Corp., playing a key role in the park’s transition to a thriving waterfront facility. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Marine Corps, where he earned the rank of major and received a Purple Heart. One of his sons is Daniel B. Murphy C’82.

Paul A. Nolle L’53, Chatham, N.J., September.

George J. Werthner C’53, Glenside, Pa., a former public relations writer and creative supervisor; Nov. 3. He began his career as a technical writer and later was associate editor for Philadelphia magazine (then Greater Philadelphia) under editor Alan Halpern C’47. He was a PR writer at the old Smith, Kline & French; he also wrote for Sundheim Advertising and Schaefer Advertising. For 16 years he was employed by Lewis & Gilman (later Lewis, Gilman & Kynett), first as writer/creative supervisor and then as senior medical writer/creative supervisor of the firm’s HealthCom Division. He continued in these roles after HealthCom merged with Foote Cone & Belding to become Vicom/San Francisco. From 1986 to 1992 he worked for Dorland Sweeney Jones and Roska Direct Marketing. He was involved with the North Hills Neighborhood Watch for many years.


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1954

Rose Gallagher Abbott Nu’54, McLean, Va., Sept. 24.

Jerome B. Apfel L’54 G’00, Haverford, Pa., an attorney with Blank Rome in Philadelphia for 46 years; Oct. 16. Although he retired as a partner in 2005, he continued to go into his office several times a week. He was an assistant district attorney for five years before joining Blank Rome, where he specialized in wills and estates. He taught continuing education classes in law and ethics for lawyers. Active at Penn, he was a founding member of the alumni society of the Center for Bioethics and was past president of the Law School board of overseers. In the arts he served on the boards of the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, the Annenberg Center, and the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra. For 30 years he and his wife, Fanchon Marks Apfel OT’54, were among a group who hosted concerts featuring young musicians in their homes. An advocate for the mentally ill, he was a board member of the Mental Health Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania and the Green Tree School in Philadelphia. He served on the Jewish Community Relations Council board and on the national board of the Union of American Hebrew congregations. Passionate about Reform Judaism, he was past president of Beth David Reform Congregation in Gladwyne, where he had served on the board since 1950. During the 1990s he helped save Har Hazaism Cemetery in Gladwyne from developers who were planning to disinter bodies from the 19th-century burial ground. Two of his sons are Ira Aaron Apfel C’90 and Matthew B. Apfel L’90, whose wife is Jacqueline D. Reses W’92.

John W. Bond WG’54, Fullerton, Calif., Oct. 21.

Frank Dolson W’54, Merion, Pa., a former sports writer for The Philadelphia Inquirer and then special assistant to the New York Yankees; Oct. 8. At Penn he was sports editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian, and in the mid-1960s wrote on sports for the Gazette. Following his graduation he was hired by Sports Illustrated; a year later the Inquirer made him the city’s youngest columnist. “He wrote with a love of sports, a flourish-free style, and a sense of moral outrage,” noted the Inquirer. “His affection for sports was so thoroughly genuine that his columns often were filled with heartfelt sentiment and indignation—sometimes side-by-side—that obscured a dry wit.” He was so popular in the 1960s and 1970s that the city’s Evening Bulletin lured him away from the Inquirer in 1975; he returned to the Inquirer as sports editor less than five months later. Yankees’ third-base coach Larry Bowa, who began dealing with the columnist as a Phillies’ minor-leaguer in the late 1960s, called him “a true-blue pro” and “a baseball purist from the word go. He was a great guy.” Along with covering the Philadelphia sports scene, over the years he chronicled several Olympic Games, track and field meets between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, the World Series, and the Super Bowl. His relationships with several generations of sports-world personalities included Olympic champion decathlete Bill Toomey, former Eagles general manager and Penn football coach Harry Gamble, and Yankees manager Joe Torre. In 1998 he wrote the biography of Phillies Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Bunning, who went on to become a U.S. Senator. Despite the celebrity associations he was known for an abiding interest in, as Dan Rottenberg C’64 put it, “amateurs over pros, athletes over administrators, minor leagues over majors, small schools over powerhouses, [and] nice losers over pompous winners.” In 1961 Dolson attended, according to Rottenberg, “every Penn football practice, including the three sessions held at 7:00 a.m.” because for him it “epitomized the high ideal of selfless sacrifice and struggle against overwhelming odds.” Following his retirement from the Inquirer in 1995, he was hired as a special assistant by Yankees owner George Steinbrenner. “Frank was at so many games … that Steinbrenner finally said, ‘Why don’t you come work for me?’” Decker W. Uhlhorn C’69, a former Penn basketball player and current senior advisor to the athletic director, told the Inquirer. At games he was often seated beside the Yankees’ public relations director, Rick Cerrone, who noted that “George found Frank’s knowledge valuable and wanted him around. He valued his opinions, and Frank had opinions.” A longtime friend of Penn basketball and the Penn Relays, he made a $1.2 million endowment to the Relays in April 2006, according to the Inquirer.

Dr. John Helwig Jr. M’54 GM’60, Lansdale, Pa., a retired cardiologist who had practiced at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and was chief of cardiology at the former Germantown Hospital; Oct. 1. He was past president of the Philadelphia County Medical Society and a board member and trustee of the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

Dr. C. William Heywood Gr’54, Mount Vernon, Iowa, emeritus professor of history and emeritus dean at Cornell College; Nov. 16, 2005. From 1949 to 1953 he taught history at the College of Wooster in Ohio. He joined the Cornell faculty in 1954, where he taught American, Latin American, and European history. In 1966 he introduced the first course on African American history at Cornell. From 1983 until his retirement in 1987 he served as dean of the college. Dr. Heywood was a Cornell College trustee, 1992-2002, when he became a life member. He served as acting president of the college for six months in 1994. During his retirement he co-wrote the book Cornell College: A Sesquicentennial History, with colleague Richard Thomas. The Delta of Iowa chapter of Phi Beta Kappa at Cornell College elected him as an honorary member in 1981, and the college awarded him the honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree in 1987. Active in the American Association of University Professors, he held several offices, including a two-year term as vice president. He was a member of the Mount Vernon Board of Education, 1965-71, serving as president from 1967 to 1971, and was elected to the Mount Vernon City Council for three terms.

Hon. A Romeo Horton WG’54, Laverock, Pa., Dec. 13, 2005.

Gerald L. Robinson W’54 GEd’67, Philadelphia, former executive director of personnel at the University; Dec. 11. He had worked at Penn for over 30 years: joining the Admissions Office in 1957, he was promoted to vice dean of admissions in 1965. He became director of residences in 1966, and was appointed dean of men in 1968 and dean of residential life in 1970: In these positions he was highly regarded by students. He headed the personnel department from 1971 to 1982. He then left Penn to work for Educational Advisory Services, International, but returned as a part-time consultant in the Wharton School, 1986-90. As a student at Penn, Jerry Robinson was a dorm counselor and a member of the freshman student government; he was a member of the Friars Senior Society and the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He played varsity football and was one of the Munger Men. Also in the ROTC program, after graduating he served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army, before returning to Penn. For 10 years he served as President of the Class of 1954 and terms as Class gift chair and Reunion chair. He served on the board of the Faculty Club (now the University Club), as president of the Wharton Club of Philadelphia, as board president of the Friars (was twice Friar of the Year), and as a member of the Football Club and the athletic advisory committee. Jerry Robinson was honored with Penn’s Alumni Award of Merit in 1997. “My father loved everything about Penn,” Susan Robinson Malta C’80, a daughter, said: “He often wore red and blue, and greeted everyone, from the president to janitors, when he strolled on Locust Walk.” One of his grandchildren is Megan T. Malta C’05.

Marvin Schwartzstein W’54, Scottsdale, Ariz., the owner of Marvin Schwartzstein & Associates; Oct. 31. At Penn he was a member of Phi Epsilon Pi fraternity and Hillel. His wife is Charlotte A. Schwartzstein CW’53 and his brother-in-law is Dr. Walter L. Arons C’41 M’44.

Theodore Zboyan Ar’54, Trenton, N.J., May 27, 2006.


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1955

Jean Shott Dohner SW’55, Cornwall, Pa., Oct. 11.

Oliver D. Groff Jr. WEv’55, Wilmington, N.C., June 30, 2005.

Roy E. Heffelfinger C’55, Bethlehem, Pa., the retired managing editor of The Morning Call newspaper, where he had worked for 43 years; Sept. 6. He played football at Penn and was a member of Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He worked part-time at The Philadelphia Inquirer while in college. At The Call he held reporting and editing positions in the newspaper’s Allentown, Bethlehem, and Carbon County offices. He worked for a brief period in circulation and handled news moving across the state, national, and world wire services before becoming managing editor in 1981. Under his leadership the newspaper won many journalism awards, including an international award for design and the Pennsylvania Newspaper Publishers Association’s premier award for vigorous defense of First Amendment rights. During the 1960s he also worked as the sports-information director at Moravian College in Bethlehem. Ray Holton, the subsequent managing editor of The Call, recalled him as “the heart and soul” of the newspaper. Staff members remembered his mentorship to two generations of journalists, extending even to the paper’s longstanding program of advising and encouraging high school newspaper staffs. He was a member of Emmanuel Congregational and Olivet Evangelical Congregational churches, where he served on the boards and was a lay minister. After retiring from The Call in 1995, he was the manager of the Arabic Living Evangelical Congregational Church food bank, for which he had worked previously.

Franklin King III WG’55, Northampton, Mass., Jan. 15, 2006.

Col. Glenn B. Owen WG’55, Moscow, Ind., March 9, 2006.

Charles C. Rohlfing Jr. W’55, Madison, Ind., Oct. 21, 2005.

Llewellyn A. Rubin EE’55 GEE’58, Parker, Colo., Oct. 20.

Rev. Robert F. Scott ChE’43 G’55, Hockessin, Del., Oct. 20.


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1956

Dr. Richard C. Clelland Gr’56, St. David’s, Pa., professor emeritus of statistics and operations research and deputy provost emeritus at the University, where he had worked for nearly 40 years; Oct. 8. He began his career at the Wharton School in 1953 as a research investigator and was promoted to assistant professor of statistics three years later. After service in operations analysis with the Alaskan Air Command in the late 1950s, he became associate professor in 1961 and was named full professor and chair in 1966. He chaired the graduate group in operations research, 1969-70; served as acting dean of the Wharton School, 1971-72; and was its associate dean, 1975-81. He also held faculty appointments in the School of Arts and Sciences and the Engineering and Nursing schools. Dr. Clelland also administered and taught in the Ford Foundation summer program for the mathematics education of business school faculty members at the Wharton School. After serving as acting associate provost in 1981, he was appointed the University’s first deputy provost in 1982, a position he held until his retirement in 1992. He served as a consultant for various business and governmental activities and chaired numerous university and school committees. And he was a trustee of the old Presbyterian Medical Center. Earlier he had taught at both Hamilton College and Syracuse University. His extensive publications include major articles on planning and decision-making as well as studies in ecology and health. While serving as the associate editor of The American Statistician from 1963 to 1970, Dr. Clelland published widely in health journals here and abroad as well as in journals of mathematics and statistics, such as American Mathematical Monthly, Behavioral Science, and the Journal of Accounting. During the 1940s he served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps, earning the rank of master sergeant. His wife is Dr. Anne B. Clelland Gr’66 and his son is Richard B. Clelland C’90.


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1957

George W. Kaelin Jr. WEv’57, Warminster, Pa., Oct. 20.

John J. Keenan G’57, Bryn Mawr, Pa., professor emeritus of English at La Salle University, where he had taught for 36 years; Oct. 14. After a brief time teaching at West Catholic High School for Boys, he worked as a medical writer for the old SmithKline & French while teaching night classes at LaSalle. He began teaching full-time at the college in 1959 and retired in 1995. While at LaSalle he chaired the English department and was editor of Four Quarters, the school’s literary magazine. In 1968 he received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. “He was an engaging and challenging teacher and the epitome of what it means to be part of La Salle University,” recalled his former student and La Salle president, Brother Michael McGinniss. His first book, Feel Free to Write: A Guide for Business and Professional People, was published in 1982. In 1987 he co-wrote Writing for Business and Industry: Process and Product. As a teenager he had played saxophone in a band with future jazz great Gerry Mulligan. In later years he played sax with Big Band Professionals, a local swing band. He was a board member of the Bryn Mawr Volunteer Fire Co.

Dr. Donald J. Oda GEE’57, Apple Valley, Calif., June 24, 2005.

Arthurlyn V. Smallwood Nu’57, Philadelphia, Sept. 24.

William E. Turner Jr. G’57, Lafayette Hill, Pa., Aug. 18, 2005.


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1958

Dr. Dean A. Brainerd D’58, Bonita Springs, Fla., Dec. 9, 2005.

Laurence R. Brown GEE’58, Springfield, Va., Oct. 30.

James A. Tanney W’58, Maple Glen, Pa., Sept. 18. One of his sisters is Mary R. Tanney GNu’90.


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1959

Dr. Donald M. Beardwood M’59, Willow Grove, Pa., Oct. 26.

Arnold H. Block W’59, Lafayette Hill, Pa., Oct. 18. His son is Jonathan A. Block C’85.

Marianne Palmer Gledhill Nu’59, Alamo, Calif., Oct. 1.

Ellen Green Nu’59, Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 19.

Dr. Douglas W. Houston Gr’59, Bronxville, N.Y., a professor of history at Fordham University for 28 years; May 10, 2006. A specialist in 20th-century diplomatic history, he taught international relations, modern Asian history, modern European history, and German history, as well as the western civilization survey. In addition to teaching at Fordham he held appointments at St. John’s University in Jamaica, N.Y.; West Virginia University; the University of Tennessee; Adelphi University; and Rutgers University, Camden. And he lectured occasionally on U.S. history for the USIA. A teacher and scholar dedicated to archival research, he compiled and edited documents for volumes in the Foreign Relations of the United States: Diplomatic Papers series, vols. 2-5, for the years 1943-45. An early contributor to what became ABC-Clio’s Historical Abstracts series, he was co-editor of Clio Press’ 20th-Century series of monographs. He published articles in the Austrian History Yearbook and French Historical Studies, in addition to documentary projects on Austro-Czech relations, 1919-24, and Sino-American relations since 1942. He had been a Fulbright scholar in Vienna and had served as a diplomatic historian in the U.S. Department of State. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II and in the U.S. Army during the Korean War.

Harold J. Jones G’59, Whitemarsh, Pa., Sept. 30.

Dr. Martin E. Sandry C’59 Gr’74, Chicago, a psychologist and self-help author; Oct. 5. He began his career as a psychologist at the Children’s Seashore House Child Development Center in Atlantic City, N.J., and then worked at Reed Mental Health Center in Oak Park, Ill. In the early 1990s he co-founded, with colleague Dr. Kenneth Peiser, Midwest Psychological Healthcare in Chicago. Because the business often had trouble collecting payments from patients and insurers, Dr. Sandry came up with the idea of publishing a self-help publication, according to Dr. Peiser, who said, “What started out as a pamphlet became a book.” The Universal 12-Step Program was published in 2000. After becoming ill in 1999, he continued to see patients and updated another book, Beat Your Addiction (2004). He and Dr. Peiser were working on a new book idea at the time of his death. He was also about to start an offsite practice, video-conferencing with patients who were unable to commute to Chicago. Also a jazz aficionado, he was an accomplished clarinetist and saxophonist.

Foster L. Shannon WEv’59, Laguna Woods, Calif., March 27, 2003.


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1960

Willliam A. Marino GEd’60, Lansdale, Pa., a retired teacher and head of the science department at Springfield High School in Montgomery County, where he had taught for 15 years; Sept. 26. He was also wrestling coach and assistant track and football coach there. In 1968 he retired to run Comar Landscaping in Horsham. He was a volunteer wrestling coach at Jenkintown Elementary School. Also a swimmer, in 1997 he won a national championship in the Senior Olympics as a member of a three-man relay team. He was a volunteer coach for special-needs children at North Penn YMCA, where he swam, according to his wife, Connie. During World War II he served in the U.S. Marine Corps on Saipan in the Pacific.

Melvin A. Moskowitz WG’60, Bethesda, Md., a chemical engineer who had worked for Mobil; Sept. 9. He had served in the U.S. Navy.


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1961

Theodore H. Green Ed’61, Springfield, Pa., a surveyor and retired associate professor of engineering at Temple University; Oct. 22. He joined Temple’s faculty in 1957 and founded a student chapter of the Pennsylvania Society of Land Surveyors at the university. During summers he worked as a surveying consultant for developers at the Jersey shore. After retiring from Temple in 1988, he taught surveying for three years at the Williamson Free School of Mechanical Trades in Media. He was a fellow of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping. Earlier he had worked for General Electric Co. in Philadelphia. He was a lifelong member and former chief of the Springfield Fire Co. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy on landing ships in the Philippines.

Richard J. Miller W’61, Piermont, N.Y., Nov. 16, 2002.


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1962

Milton Berkowitz GEE’62, Villanova, Pa., Nov. 13.

Dr. Anthony F. Garito Gr’68, Radnor, Pa., professor emeritus of physics; Nov. 1. He came to Penn in 1965 as an advanced research projects pre-doctoral research fellow. After obtaining his Ph.D he spent the next two years as a research associate at the University. He joined the faculty as an assistant professor of physics in 1970. He was promoted to associate professor in 1973 and to full professor five years later. He became emeritus professor in 2002. He also served as a visiting professor at the University of Paris and as a director of the Frontier Research Program at the Institute for Physical and Chemical Research in Japan. He was adjunct professor of optical sciences at the University of Arizona from 1995 to 2004, the year he retired from teaching. During the 1970s he was a consultant to Pennwalt Chemical Co., DuPont, and Hughes Corp., and in the 1980s he consulted for U.S. Industries. He had served on the advisory board for Nonlinear Optics and on numerous committees for events in the U.S. and abroad, including the Conference on Magnetism and Magnetic Materials and the Lake Arrowhead Conference on One Dimensional Organic and Inorganic Conductors. His research, which was widely published, focused on nonlinear optical phenomena at fast and ultra-fast timescales, along with studies in many-body effects and material physics. In 1999 he was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society for his “contributions to the understanding of enhancement mechanisms for second- and third-order nonlinear optical processes in organic and polymer structures.” Since 1997 he had been president of his own firm, Photon-X, which develops devices for optical communications. One of his sons is Anthony L. Garito C’90.

Edward B. Kostin W’62, Darien, Conn., a retired managing partner for PriceWaterhouse Coopers’ office in Stamford; Sept. 30. He spent his entire career at PriceWaterhouse, where he was a taxation advisory specialist. His assignments included Boston, New York, Washington, and London. After retiring he embarked on a second career teaching tax policy and law at the Wharton School and the Law School. Active in community affairs, he was a board member of the Stamford Center for the Arts and served a four-year term as a member of the Darien Board of Finance. He served on the investment and audit committees of Temple Sinai in Stamford. From 1962 to 1966 he served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Supply Corps, stationed in Alaska and Japan. His wife is Susan Finkelstein Kostin W’76, whose brother is James N. Finkelstein C’73.


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1963

Elaine Meltzer CW’63, Toughkenamon, Pa., March 16, 2006.

Dr. Ronald M. Wasserstrom D’63, North Palm Beach, Fla., June 25, 2006.


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1964

Dr. William D. Brinckloe Gr’64, Carmel, Calif., Sept. 28, 2003.

1965

Dr. Michael M. Drucker M’65, Newport Coast, Calif., June 25, 2006.

James J. Kelly W’65, Warrington, Pa., May 25, 2006.

Eileen G. Lepoff CW’65 GEE’74, Los Angeles, July 31.

David C. MacGregor WG’65, Bryn Mawr, Pa., Sept. 8.

Everett M. May WG’65, Stamford, Conn., April 9, 2005.

Dr. Francis E. Rosato GM’65, Gladwyne, Pa., a retired professor of surgery at Jefferson Medical College and retired chief of surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital; Oct. 18. Earlier he had taught at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where he headed the solid tumor program and was co-director of the neoplastic chemotherapy clinic. He taught at Hahnemann Medical College and, for a few years, at Eastern Virginia Medical School. Returning to Philadelphia in 1978, he was named professor of surgery at Jefferson and chief of surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, positions he held until retiring in 2005. Known for his skill in cancer treatment and surgical prowess, he performed the Philadelphia area’s first liver transplant at Jefferson in 1984. “His surgical techniques doubled the life spans of patients with pancreatic cancer,” said Dr. James W. Fox IV, professor and chief of reconstructive surgery at Jefferson. Also a revered teacher, he was remembered by Dr. Herbert Cohn, professor of surgery at Jefferson, as “a master surgeon [who] developed the most popular surgical teaching program in the region.” Dr. Rosato wrote several books and more than 250 scientific papers on cancer. He was the recipient of numerous professional awards. Two of his children are Gertrude M. Rosato C’89 and Dr. Gary E. Rosato C’86, whose wife is Jeannette K. Rosato C’86. Francis’ brother is Dr. Ernest F. Rosato M’62 GM’66, a professor of surgery at Penn. One of Ernest’s daughters is Catherine Jane Rosato C’95. Four of his sons are Ernest F. Rosato Jr. C’85, William John Rosato C’87 GAr’92, Rafael F. Rosato C’88, and Gerard Michael Rosato C’92.

1966

Marsh W. Bates WG’66, Sarasota, Fla., Sept. 21, 2004.


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1967

Helen S. Addy Nu’67, Venice, Fla., March 2, 2006.

Robert G. Bjoring WG’67, San Antonio, June 8, 2006.

Claire D. Garabedian CW’67, Larchmont, N.Y., March 7, 2006.

Harry Printz WG’67, Novato, Calif., April 28, 2006.


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1968

Col. Gail N. Liberty Nu’68, San Antonio, Sept. 18.

Donald B. Schaller WG’68, Asheville, N.C., May 5, 2005.


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1969

Dr. Henry G. Hodo III C’69, Brentwood, Tenn., the president and co-owner of Business Cards Tomorrow; Aug. 10. At Penn he was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity, in which he remained active throughout his life. He had taught biochemistry at Meharry Medical College in Brentwood, and then at Vanderbilt University before leaving academia to start Business Cards Tomorrow with a longtime friend, Stanley Lane. He had been a volunteer with the Salvation Army and GraceWorks, and was an active member of Brentwood United Methodist Church.

Christine Carlson Kohnstamm GEd’69, Vreeland, Netherlands, July 12. She had worked for the Kim-Am Info Center in Amstelveen.

Dr. Douglas G. MacDonald C’69, Plainfield, N.H., Sept. 18, 2003. He had worked in the Hitchcock Clinic of Dartmouth Medical School.


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1971

Dr. Harold B. Heiss GM’71, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Oct. 1.


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1972

Sandra Eberwein Nu’72, Slatington, Pa., Aug. 8, 2005.

Joan Clapper Wargo Nu’72, Glenside, Pa., Aug. 4.


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1973

Sandra B. Handford GCP’73, Glen Mills, Pa., September.

Rodger F. Hinton GAr’73, Pickens, S.C., a senior associate of architecture with LS3P Associates in Charlotte, N.C.; July 21.

Martin L. Rosenstein WG’73, New York, Nov. 12, 2003.


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1974

John A. Gillis Jr. WG’74, Swarthmore, Pa., Oct. 14.


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1975

Margaret Ruffin Cooke WG’75, Oakton, Va., Feb. 17, 2003.


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1976

Dr. Patricia J. Grayson Gr’76, Secane, Pa., the owner and operator of The Bookworm in Norwood since 1983; Sept. 29. “She was known for turning the reluctant student and occasional reader into book lovers, captivating many with her exceptional knowledge of books, literature, and many things in between,” said Jennifer J. Conway, her life partner. Earlier she had taught German and comparative literature at Penn, Temple, and Rowan universities. As a linguist she was fluent in German, French, and Dutch; she served as a freelance translator and editor of books and journal articles for Penn’s Medical School and the School of Veterinary Medicine. In the late 1970s she was business manager for the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies when it was based at Penn; she went on to copy-edit texts and journal articles for J.B. Lippincott, the American College of Physicians, W.B. Saunders Co., William & Wilkins, and Aspen Publishers.

Dr. Lawrence Schein Gr’76, Denver, May 24, 2005.


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 1978

Linda Grace Baldwin WG’78, Ross, Calif., July 18, 2002.


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1979

Harald Bowen WG’79, Jacksonville, Fla., May 19, 2006.


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1980

Dr. Thaddeus W. Anderson V’80, Union, Maine, Feb. 2006.

F. Erich Goetting EAS’80 W’80, Cupertino, Calif., vice president and general manager of the Advanced Products Division of Xilinx, where he spearheaded the development of the Virtex series of products; Nov. 17. At Xilinx he was responsible for product research and development, systems and applications engineering, product and technical marketing, and computer and network infrastructure. A key driver of industry-wide partnerships, he initiated Xilinx relationships with such companies as IBM, Conexant, Agilent, Arithmatica, Apache, MontaVista, WindRiver, and QNX. At Xilinx he was known as “a consummate problem-solver with an uncanny ability to quickly get to the heart of the most complex technical issues and propose possible solutions,” according to colleagues. Most recently he had been a speaker at DesignCon 2006.

Sylvia Wishoff Hantman CGS’80, Philadelphia, Oct. 23. Her daughter is Rabbi Shoshana Hantman C’79.


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1989

Mark Cassorla C’89 G’89, Olivette, Mo., Aug. 28.

Kerry Ann Hogan C’89, New York, Sept. 13, 2005.


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1990

Dr. Tarek K. Alameldin GEng’90 Gr’91, Fresno, Calif., professor of computer science at California State University, Fresno; Nov. 6. He was also assistant to the dean for research and development in the College of Science and Mathematics. At Penn he worked under Dr. Norman I. Badler, professor of Computer and Information Science. Dr. Alameldin began his teaching career in 1983; prior to coming to Fresno in 1990, he taught at Widener University, Penn, and Texas A&M. He was a NASA Research Fellow during the 1995-96 academic year. While at Texas A&M he was a founding faculty member in a groundbreaking Ph.D program in scientific visualization. He was active in developing computer science-related grants in applied parallel processing, scientific visualization, facial modeling, and animation. At Fresno State he successfully received grants from the National Science Foundation for research on scientific visualization and virtual-design environment. During an earlier budget crisis in Fresno’s College of Engineering, he served as chair of both the Computer Science Department and the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, according to Dr. Walter Read, current chair of Computer Science. “Tarek was a faculty member of great vision and imagination, always looking for new opportunities for his students,” he said. Dr. Alameldin served as project director for IQ Biometrics, 2000-02, and for Central Valley Dermatology and Laser Medical Center, 1999-2002. He was an adviser in information-technology cluster training for Development Informatics Inc. and PriceWaterhouse Coopers Global, 2000-01. He was senior adviser for information technology for ARD Inc. and an academic advisory board member for the science faculty at United Arab Emirates University. He published widely in professional journals.


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1991

Cecil M. Chopin WAM’91, Austin, Tex., Nov. 14, 2004.

John K. Joe C’91, Bethany, Conn., Aug. 8.


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1995

George M. Sokolowsky GEx’95, Marlboro, N.J., Jan. 2, 2006.


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1996

Susien Kim Helfinstine C’96, Reston, Va., Nov. 19. At Penn she was a member of the sailing team, where she met her future husband, Charles A. Helfinstine EAS’96. She had worked for the National Cancer Institute in Washington.


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2000

Craig L. Nelson C’00, Lansdowne, Pa., a financial analyst for RBC Capital Markets in Philadelphia; Oct. 11. A competitive swimmer, he was a member of Penn’s varsity swim team for all four years. He kept in touch with his swim teammates and visited them around the country; they were “incredibly supportive” during his seven-month illness, said his father, David L. Nelson. Before joining RBC, he had worked for Commerce Capital Markets in Cherry Hill, N.J., and for Potomac Fund Management in Mt. Laurel. He was a former assistant manager and swim coach at Briarcliffe Swim Club in Glenolden, Pa.


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2007

Casey K. Slayton Gr’07, Philadelphia, a behavior therapist and dancer; Sept. 10. At Penn she was working toward a doctorate in clinical psychology. For more than seven years she was a popular therapist who worked with autistic and special-needs children in their homes and classrooms. Also a dancer, she held degrees in dance and movement therapy; she conducted weekly movement-therapy sessions for clients.


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Faculty and Staff

Dr. Frank Paul Bowman, Philadelphia, professor emeritus of Romance languages who had specialized in 19th-century French literature; Nov. 14. He joined Penn’s faculty in 1963 as an associate professor of Romance languages and was promoted to professor in 1966. He received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1982. He retired in 1991 after nearly 30 years of service, but continued to teach, and serve as director of the University’s newly formed French Institute in 1992, before becoming emeritus in 1995. During his tenure he served as department graduate chair, 1975-78, and as faculty master for the Modern Languages College House. He founded and directed the Penn Exchange with Lyons in 1989. The author of many books and articles, he served on various editorial boards, including French Forum, Nineteenth-Century French Studies, and Romanticism. Dr. Bowman received numerous awards, including a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities (1977-78) and two Guggenheim fellowships (1968-69 and 1986-87). In 1992 he was made an Officier des Palmes Academique by the French government in recognition of his contributions to French studies, and noted for his work in 19th-century intellectual life and literature.

Dr. Richard C. Clelland. See Class of 1956.

Kenneth Wray Conners. See Class of 1930.

Dr. William A. Creasey, clinical pharmacologist and former research professor of pharmacology and pediatrics; Aug. 30. He came to Penn in 1976 as a lecturer in the School of Medicine’s pharmacology department; three years later he was appointed research professor there. He enjoyed teaching basic and clinical research of cancer chemotherapy and clinical pharmacology. He left the University in 1982. Earlier he had been a faculty member at Yale. In later years Dr. Creasey held positions for E.R. Squibb & Sons, Pharmaceuticals/VRG International, Information Ventures, Inc., and the American Association for Cancer Research, Inc. His daughter is Maria Creasey-Baldwin C’83.

Dr. Anthony F. Garito. See Class of 1968.

Dr. John Hale. See Class of 1949.

Edward B. Kostin. See Class of 1962.

Dr. David Kritchevsky, Bryn Mawr, Pa., professor emeritus of animal biology at the School of Veterinary Medicine; Nov. 20. Before coming to Penn he was a staff member in the bio-organic group of the Radiation Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, 1950-1952. From 1952 to 1957 he was a staff member at Lederle Laboratories in Pearl River, N.Y. He joined the faculty at the Wistar Institute in 1957. He was associate director of Wistar from 1975 to 1991, and in 1985 he was named Caspar Wistar Scholar at the Institute. Dr. Kritchevsky was a member of many graduate groups at Penn: molecular biology (1965-1992), chairing it from 1972 to 1984; biochemistry (1965-1992); and pathology (1971-1995). He was a professor of biochemistry in surgery at Penn, 1972 to 1992; an adjunct professor of biochemistry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania, 1988 to 1998; and the Wistar Professor of Biochemistry in the School of Veterinary Medicine at Penn, 1966 to 2001. He was professor emeritus of animal biology at the Veterinary School at the time of his death. Dr. Kritchevsky wrote the first book on cholesterol in 1958 and, in 1981 with O.J. Pollak, the first book on sitosterol, an extract with anti-cholesterol properties found in wheat germ oil, corn oil, and other grain and nut oils. He received many national and international awards during his lifetime, including awards from the University of Graz, the American Heart Association, and the American Institute of Cancer Research. In 2006 the American Society for Nutrition announced the establishment of the David Kritchevsky Career Achievement Award in Nutrition, to be awarded annually. Dr. Kritchevsky was a past president of the American Society of Nutritional Sciences (then known as the American Institute of Nutrition), the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, and the John Morgan Society. He also served on numerous editorial boards and scientific advisory committees in academia, government, and industry. In addition to his distinguished career, he was also known for his humorous take on life and science, perhaps expressed best in a series of songs he used for teaching, including the “Cholesterol Biosynthesis Song,” sung to the tune of “Jingle Bells,” and “If I Had a Big Grant,” a takeoff on “If I Were a Rich Man,” from Fiddler on the Roof. His wife is Dr. Evelyn S. Kritchevsky Gr’78 and one of his daughters is Dr. Janice Kritchevsky Sojka V’82.

Dr. Robert F. Lucid, Philadelphia, emeritus professor of English; Dec. 12. Before coming to Penn he had taught at the University of Chicago (his graduate alma mater) and Wesleyan University. He joined Penn’s faculty as an assistant professor of English in 1964, was promoted to associate professor in 1968, and to professor in 1975. During his 32 years at Penn, he served as graduate chair of English, 1974-76, and chair of the department, 1980-85, and 1990. He was chair of the Faculty Senate, 1976-77. Dr. Lucid founded and served as faculty director of the Penn in London program, and was associate director of the Provost’s Council on Undergraduate Education. As chair of PEN at Penn and the Steinberg Symposium, he brought a wide range of writers and thinkers to campus, including Arthur Miller, Nadine Gordimer, and Yevgeny Yevtushenko (see Gazette, “Lucid Observations,” October 1996). He also chaired the Collegiate Planning Board, the Council of Undergraduate Deans, and the Residential Faculty Council. Heavily involved in campus life, he was a principal architect of Penn’s college-house system, which transformed the undergraduate residential experience. He spent over 20 years living on campus, as faculty master of Hill College House for 17 years and, most recently, of Gregory College House. Dr. James J. O’Donnell, a former Penn faculty member and now provost of Georgetown University, who succeeded Dr. Lucid as faculty master at Hill, recalled that “even when he left, his spirit stayed. He had shaped a community and a spirit that were a privilege to inherit … He wasn’t the biggest guy you ever met, but … he was a giant.” Dr. Lucid received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1975 and the Ira Abrams Award in 1987. “He was, for me, the most passionate of the scholars who pushed me to look beyond the easy and simple reading of literature … I thought he was wonderful and stimulating and brilliant—he was everything I loved about learning at Penn,” said Elsie Sterling Howard CW’68. Carol Morgenstern Kaufman CW’71 remembered his “towering presence. After every one of his brilliant and shapely lectures, students clustered around him, as if unwilling to let go of the almost magical clarity, order, and insight he had given us.” At his retirement in 1996, he was honored with a colloquium featuring Norman Mailer and Richard Wilbur, former U.S. poet laureate. Dr. Lucid was the original proponent of the Kelly Writers House, which was established in 1996 (see Gazette, “The House That Writers Built,” July 2006). His publications include an edition of Richard Henry Dana’s Journal and two collections of work by and about Norman Mailer: The Long Patrol: Twenty-Five Years of Writing from the Work of Norman Mailer and Norman Mailer, the Man and His Work. At the time of his death, Dr. Lucid was completing Mailer’s authorized biography, on which he had been at work since retiring from Penn. An excerpt from the book will appear in the first issue of the Mailer Review in September. His wife was Joanne Tharalson Lucid [“Obituaries,” Nov|Dec 2002]. He is survived by their son John Michael Lucid II C’86 GEd’86.

Dr. Donald B. Martin, Bryn Mawr, Pa., professor emeritus of medicine and former director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; Nov. 1. Before coming to Penn he taught at Harvard Medical School and worked at Massachusetts General Hospital, where he was chief of the diabetes unit, 1967-79. He studied in Paris on a Fulbright scholarship in 1962 and in Geneva on a Guggenheim fellowship in 1974. Dr. Martin joined Penn in 1979 as the founding director of the Rodebaugh Center for Diabetes Research and Education. He became associate chair of the Department of Medicine in 1985, the same year in which he assumed directorship of the Internal Medicine Residency Program. Known for his dedication to clinical education, he was equally devoted to his residents and stood at the forefront of a movement in medical education to make residency more humane for doctors during their training. He received the Donna K. McCurdy Department of Medicine Housestaff Teaching Award in 1990, the Penn Pearls Teaching Award for excellence in student teaching in 1993, and the Medical Student Government Teaching Award for Clinical Medicine in 1994. In 1996, the year he became emeritus, the medical school established the Donald B. Martin Teaching Service Award in his honor. He continued to teach until 2006. Dr. Arthur H. Rubenstein, executive vice president of the University of Pennsylvania Health System and dean of the School of Medicine, said Dr. Martin’s “dedication to the field of medicine and passion for educating future physicians greatly impacted the Penn community.” In 1997 the American College of Physicians board of regents awarded him a Mastership. Dr. Martin co-wrote numerous articles in medical journals, including the Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet, and Science. He had served stateside in the U.S. Navy during World War II.

Gerald L. Robinson. See Class of 1954.

Dr. Cletus W. Schwegman. See Class of 1948.

©2007 The Pennsylvania Gazette
Last modified 04/28/07