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July|August 2007

1910

1921

1923

1924

1925

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Faculty & Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1921

Grace C. Monteith OT’21, Philadelphia, a retired occupational therapist; Jan. 21. She first worked in veterans’ and military hospitals in Washington and New Haven, Conn. She served as chief of occupational therapy at Coatesville Veterans Administration Hospital from 1939 to 1948. Shortly before retiring she lost sight in one eye after a patient struck her with a chair; she then worked as an occupational therapist until a bus accident forced her into a second retirement. She later became a volunteer at the Deshler-Morris House in Germantown; she greeted guests at the annual Christmas Tea there a few years ago. Her son noted that at age 107 she “could do crossword puzzles in ink, and heavily salted everything she ate.”


1925

Henry L. Gartner W’25, Boynton Beach, Fla., the co-founder of National Department Store and founder of Garwood Mills Discount Department Store; Feb. 2. He was past president of the Atlantic City Merchants Association, Congregation Beth Judah, and the Delaware Valley Region of United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism. In 2005 he attended his 80th Reunion and was honored as the oldest alumnus of the Wharton School.


1927

Dr. Rudolf J. Noer M’27, Northfield, Minn., 2003.


1929

Clarence J. Nickman W’29 L’32, Owings Mills, Md., Dec. 10.


1930

Alfhild A. Brickbauer Ed’30, Reading, Pa., Sept. 29, 2005.

Horace E. Kramer WEF’30, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Nov. 9.


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1931

Allyn R. Bell W’31, Advance, N.C., Oct. 26.

George T. Bowes W’31, Denville, N.J., April 3, 2006.

Elizabeth MacKy Wentz Ed’31, Media, Pa., June 20, 2005.


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1932

Karl W. Brandau ChE’32, Cedarburg, Wis., Nov. 13.

Franklin W. Wolfgang WEF’32, Lititz, Pa., Dec. 23, 2005.


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1933

Arthur B. Compton Jr. W’33, Dayton, Ohio, Dec. 6, 2005.

Harry E. Owens Ed’33, Broomall, Pa., June 13, 2006.

Ruth Thompson Stamps Ed’33, Galloway, N.J., Jan. 6.


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1934

Harold F. Crocker W’34, Mount Pleasant, Tex., Dec. 9.

Bertram P. Haines EE’34, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., a retired mechanical engineer for Philco Corp., where he had worked for 34 years; Nov. 9.

Robert N. Nathason WEv’34, Philadelphia, Oct. 24.


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1935

Dr. William H. Waddell V’35, Kaaawa, Hawaii, a veterinarian who was also one of the last two surviving “Buffalo Soldiers”; Jan. 30. In 1935 he became the first African American granted a license to practice veterinary medicine in Pennsylvania, and the first to practice in West Virginia. He was the first black member of the American Veterinary Medicine Association. In 2003 he was honored as a co-founder of the historic Tuskegee Institute School of Veterinary Medicine. The Honolulu branch of the NAACP awarded its first scholarship in his name. During World War II he served with the U.S. Army’s 9th and the historic 10th Cavalry.

1936

Erwin H. Eisen W’36, San Diego, Feb. 26, 2006.

Raymond B. Evans W’36, Beverly Hills, Calif., popular-song lyricist and one of the famous duo, Evans and Livingston; Feb. 16. At Penn he met the late Jay Livingston C’37 and joined his dance band, The Continentals; they played at college parties and, during school vacations, with cruise-ship bands. After graduation they continued to perform on cruise ships before moving to New York, where Ray worked as an accountant while they began their songwriting collaboration. Their first hit, “G’bye Now” came in 1941. In 1944 they moved to Hollywood at the urging of benefactor Johnny Mercer, and scored a hit with Betty Hutton’s recording of “Stuff Like That.” They were under contract at Paramount from 1945 to 1955. Their first Oscar nomination came in 1945 for “The Cat and the Canary,” from the film Why Girls Leave Home. In 1946 five versions of their song “To Each His Own” were listed on Billboard’s Top 10 List. They won their first songwriting Oscar for “Buttons and Bows,” from the 1948 comedy Western The Paleface; sung by Bob Hope in the film, it was later recorded by Dinah Shore and others, making it a jukebox hit. In 1951 they won the Oscar for “Mona Lisa,” from Captain Carey, U.S.A.: Originally entitled “Prima Donna” until renamed by Ray’s wife, it remained his favorite of all their songs. In 1950 Evans and Livingston made a cameo appearance, playing themselves, in Billy Wilder’s classic film, Sunset Boulevard. After leaving Paramount to freelance in 1955, they won their third Oscar for “Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera),” which was sung by Doris Day in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1956 thriller The Man Who Knew Too Much. They earned three other Oscar nominations for “Tammy,” sung by Debbie Reynolds in Tammy and the Bachelor (1957); “Almost in Your Arms” from Houseboat (1958); and the title song for Dear Heart (1964). Foremost among their songs, which reportedly have sold nearly 500 million copies, is the Christmas standard “Silver Bells”; introduced in the 1951 Bob Hope comedy, The Lemon Drop Kid, it is said to have been recorded by nearly 150 artists and has sold more than 160 million copies. They also wrote the music and lyrics for two Broadway musicals, Oh Captain in 1958 (a Tony nominee for best musical) and Let It Ride in 1961. In 1979 two of their songs were included in the hit Broadway revue Sugar Babies. They made television history in 1954 when they wrote the tunes for the first 90-minute color television “spectacular,” NBC’s Satins and Spurs, starring Betty Hutton. They also wrote the memorable themes for the television series Bonanza and Mr. Ed. In later years they provided special material for Bob Hope and charity shows. In 1993 Ray returned to his hometown, Salamanca, N.Y., which renamed a renovated theater in his honor. Two years later they earned a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and in 1996 they were saluted in a special presentation by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. In 1998 Ray and Jay were honored when the Los Angeles city council designated February 6 as Jay Livingston-Ray Evans Day, in recognition of their 60 years of collaboration and contributions to the world of popular music. After Jay died in 2001 [see “Obituaries,” March/April 2002], Ray wrote a few songs with other collaborators, though he found it a strange experience after being teamed with him for over 60 years: “Jay is a marvelous musician,” he told The New York Times in 1985. “I have a tin ear.” Yet singer-pianist Michael Feinstein, who released an album in 2002 devoted to the Evans-Livingston songbook, told The Times, “Ray had a great ear for language, for the vernacular … He was able to distill a mood or feeling into a song without it sounding clichéd. He did not consider himself a sophisticated writer, but he knew how to express the thoughts, feelings, and emotions of the common man in an eloquent way.” [See “Alumni Profiles,” May 1997].

David P. Garcia Ed’36 GEd’54, Avalon, N.J., July.

Milton Glaser C’36, Richmond, Va., an interior designer who was instrumental in the restoration of the White House Library during the Kennedy Administration; Jan. 10. He worked for the Walter Ballard Co. in New York and was an associate with the George Howe architectural firm in Philadelphia. During World War II he designed battleship and aircraft-carrier interiors for the New York Shipbuilding Co. He moved to Richmond and established one of the first interior-design firms in the South. His projects, which appeared in many national publications, included the Bull and Bear Club, the Reynolds Metals Co., and A.H. Robins Pharmaceutical Corp. in Richmond; the Forsythe Memorial Hospital and Salem College in Winston-Salem, N.C.; and the White House Library. The first president of the Virginia chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers, he became national president in 1958 and board chair in 1960. He served on the acquisitions committee for the Virginia governor’s mansion and on the board of the Virginia Center for Creative Arts.

Lillian P. Koltnow Ed’36, Palo Alto, Dec. 27.

Dr. James J. McCort C’36 M’40, Walnut Creek, Calif., June 12, 2006.

Dr. William B. Patterson M’36, Wailuku, Hawaii, a retired obstetrician-gynecologist; Dec. 29. From 1941 to 1961 he served as a plantation physician for Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co. and later for Wailuku Sugar Co. In 1961 he and a group of physicians founded the Maui Medical Group in Wailuku, where he practiced his specialty until retirement in 1979. He wrote an autobiography, From the Isle of Sky to the Isle of Maui, about his life on the island.

Emerson M. VanDoren W’36, Seaside Park, N.J., July 2, 2006.


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1937

Dr. Bertram M. Bernstein C’37, Osprey, Fla., medical director of the New Jersey Department of Human Services from 1951 until his retirement in 1984, who established the state’s Medicaid program in 1970; Feb. 13. He was also a faculty member for more than 20 years of Hahnemann University Medical School. A particular interest in medical-insurance issues led to his initiating the Medicaid program. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a flight surgeon at bases in the U.S.

Michael Busha WEv’37, Avalon, N.J., Aug. 6, 2005.

Stanley Worth W’37, Delray Beach, Fla., Oct. 22.


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1938

Dr. Frank F. Allbritten Jr. M’38 GM’45, Cunningham, Kan., May 16, 2005.

Inez Bellow Gottlieb CW’38 ASC’61, New York, the Emmy Award-winning former director of public affairs at Philadelphia’s WCAU-TV, Channel 10; Dec. 2. From the 1960s to the early 1980s, she developed and supervised documentaries and special programs for the CBS affiliate. The program Now Is the Time, with Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee, dealt with the Civil Rights movement and won the station an Emmy in the 1967-8 season. Other programs that she created featured Mike Wallace, Imogene Coca, Jack Palance, John Facenda (WCAU-TV’s longtime news anchor), and Gene London, who hosted The Learndromat, a long-running program for children. She was executive producer for the children’s program Star Stuff. Long active in Philadelphia civic and cultural organizations, she founded the Arts Council at the YM and YWHA and produced theater for children through Pied Piper Productions, a company she co-founded.

Dr. Norman E. Mendenhall M’38, Sudbury, Mass., a retired obstetrician-gynecologist; Jan. 1. During the 1940s he began his own private practice in in Johnstown, Pa.; he served on the staffs of Conemaugh Valley Memorial, Mercy, and Lee hospitals. Fascinated as well by aviation, he received his pilot’s license in 1938. He was an examiner for the FAA, performing the physical examinations for licensing pilots. He held pilot’s ratings for private, instrument, commercial, single-engine, multi-engine, seaplane, and glider aircraft. With an undergraduate background in aeronautical engineering, he was able to maintain and repair his own aircraft, including its electronic equipment. During World War II he served with the U.S. Army Air Force Aviation Medical Corps. He conducted altitude training of B-26 pilots and crew, and he set up the altitude-training unit for B-24 and B-29 bombers at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

Frank J. Ratschof Ed’38 GEd’39, Stanhope, N.J., May 2005.

Yetta Felt Shapiro PSW’38, Denver, Oct. 30, 2005.

Robert R. Solenberger C’38 G’40, Tucson, Ariz., Dec. 22.

Milton Sternberg WEv’38, Marlton, N.J., Sept. 3.

Robert W. Sykes W’38, Sharpsburg, Md., Oct. 31.


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1939

Dr. Ryland Croshaw V’39, Moorestown, N.J., Jan. 15.

Edla M. Dahlquist Ed’39 GEd’51, Norristown, Pa., Dec. 7.

Dr. Hyman Lewis D’39, Boca Raton, Fla., Dec. 21.


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1940

Dr. Milton T. Edelman WEF’40 WG’47, Carbondale, Ill., a former professor of economics at Southern Illinois University; Aug. 3.

Joseph P. Sims Jr. C’40, Devon, Pa., a retired travel agent; Feb. 7. During World War II he was a U.S. Naval aviator. One of his sons is David L. Sims C’76.


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1941

Claire Cox Cahill G’41, Paoli, Pa., a chemist who had worked for Rohm & Haas and the CIA; Jan. 30. During World War II she was a rocket-fuel scientist at Rohm & Haas. After joining the CIA in the late 1950s she traveled to Jordan, India, Germany, Brazil, and other countries to train agents in the use of invisible inks, hidden cameras, and other spy craft. She then worked on the U.S. space and missile program at the Redstone Arsenal in Alabama. A bridge enthusiast, she had played with justices of the Supreme Court when she lived in Washington.

George G. Embick W’41, Coatesville, Pa., a retired national account sales manager of Stephen F. Whitman Co. of Philadelphia, the makers of Whitman’s Sampler chocolates; Nov. 11. He worked there for 40 years, retiring in the late 1980s. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps.

George W. Goodell WG’41, Fairview, N.C., 2006.

Dr. George G. Graham C’41 M’45 GM’59, Gibson Island, Md., founding director of the of human-nutrition division in the Department of International Health at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University; Jan. 14. He held positions at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio and the British-American Hospital in Lima, Peru, including acting medical director, 1961-65; while there he established the Institute for Nutritional Research, which he served as president until 1990. He was chief pediatrician at the old Baltimore City hospitals. In 1968 he was appointed professor of international health at what was then the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, and in 1976 became the founding director of human nutrition. Dr. Keith P. West, a nutritionist in the international-health department at Hopkins and former student of Dr. Graham’s, called him “a champion and specialist in the prevention of early-childhood malnutrition in Peru and the South American continent,” citing his consuming attention to the issue of malnutrition in developing countries. During the 1980s Dr. Graham served on the Presidential Task Force on Food Assistance. In 2005 the George G. Graham Professorship in Infant and Child Nutrition was created at Johns Hopkins. Dr. William C. MacLean, another former student, recalled, “He was also a wonderful teacher and mentor. Nobody in my training had ever focused on nutrition or made it come alive.” One of his daughters is Marianne G. Moxon CW’72. His brothers are Harry F. Graham W’48, whose son is Bruce A. Graham W’76; and Bruce J. Graham Ar’49, whose children are George A. Graham C’82, Lisa Graham C’84, and Mara G. Dworsky C’86.

Raoul A. Ibarguen Ar’41 GAr’42, Los Angeles, a retired architect and designer; Jan. 26, 2006. He began his career in 1944 as a structural packaging designer before establishing his own design studio in Philadelphia, which he managed from 1948 to 1962. He was a founding member of the Artists Guild of Philadelphia. And he was a part-time instructor in drawing and rendering in the University’s School of Fine Arts, 1947-51. After moving to California he served as a design consultant to the Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley in 1963 then joined the staff as a designer from 1964 to 1966. He re-established his own design practice in 1966. From 1970 to 1972 he was a designer for the Oakland Museum.

Charlotte Puttmann Menaker CW’41, Tarrytown, N.Y., a retired reference and acquisitions librarian at the Finkelstein Memorial Library in Spring Valley; Dec. 14. She was known as “Putt” while at Penn, and graduated Phi Beta Kappa, according to her daughter, Drusilla Menaker C’78, whose husband is John J. Daniszewski W’79. Among her mother’s files, Dru found an English essay marked A+, with a comment from the professor: “One of the best papers I’ve ever read.” Charlotte had lived in Sergeant Hall, where later Dru and John worked for The Daily Pennsylvanian. After retiring she was a part-time librarian at the Nyack Public Library into her early 80s. Earlier she had worked in journalism and advertising. She served on the board of Friends of Nyack, the Edward Hopper House of Arts Center, and the Tappan Zee Theater. She edited the first Guide to Nyack, and was editor of Nyack in the 20th Century: A Centennial Journal (2000).

Herbert L. Myers W’41, Columbus, N.C., a retired executive in the dental industry; July 30. Known as “Bud,” he joined his family’s business, Climax Dental Supply, in Philadelphia in 1946. He went on to lead the company, which became a subsidiary of IU International, before his retirement in 1980. He had been an associate trustee at Penn’s School of Dental Medicine and an honorary member of the International College of Dentists. He was a former president of the American Dental Trade Association and former treasurer of the American Fund for Dental Health. Devoted to horses, nature, and land conservation, he and his wife, Deborah, helped save thousands of acres near their horse farm in Bucks County, Pa., and then in Polk County, N.C., where they moved in 1990. In North Carolina he was active in conservation efforts through the Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, the Collinsville Equestrian Trails Association, and Greenspace Consultants. As a teenager he had played clarinet with big bands on the Borscht circuit in the Catskills and in Cuba. During World War II he served as a first lieutenant with the 90th Infantry Division, Third Army, leading an ambulance corps from D-Day through a march across Europe. He was awarded five Battle Stars, a Purple Heart, and a Bronze Star. He was prominent in the United World Federalists, an organization founded after World War II to promote world peace. One of his daughters is Bouzha S. Cookman C’79, whose husband is Dr. William H. Lehr C’79 ChE’79 GCh’84 WG’85.


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1942

David Bullen W’42, San Francisco, Oct. 27, 2005.

Dr. Walter Clavan Ch’42 Gr’49, Wynnewood, Pa., Dec. 15.

Elise Duncan Danforth CW’42, Gainesville, Fla., July 2006.

E. Dillwyn Darlington G’42 L’48, Lexington, Ky., an attorney who practiced in Morrisville and Feasterville, Pa., for 56 years; Oct. 18.

Michael Kranick WEv’42, Modesto, Calif., March 30, 2006.

James D. McMuray W’42, Tulsa, Okla., Oct. 8.

Hon. Paul H. Roney W’42, St. Petersburg, Fla., senior judge of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals; Sept. 16. He practiced law in New York during the 1940s, then returned to his hometown of St. Petersburg, where he opened his own office in 1957. He was appointed to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in the early 1970s; when the jurisdiction was divided with the creation of the Atlanta-based 11th Circuit Court, he became one of the 12 original judges. In 1986 he was named chief judge, a post he held for three years, before becoming senior judge in 1989. As the 11th Circuit’s second chief judge, he was known for his efforts at fostering an allegiance among the federal judges, including visiting all of them in their hometowns. A longtime pioneer for civil rights, as a young lawyer he helped racially integrate the Bar Association in St. Petersburg, and as a judge he hired clerks of diverse backgrounds. As senior judge he continued to take cases on a limited basis until the end of his life. He was a former director and vice president of the American Red Cross, and a trustee of the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg.

Herbert P. Wallace W’42, Fort Myers, Fla., Dec. 2.


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1943

Stuyvesant Barry G’43, Newtown, Pa., retired teacher and former principal of Buckingham Friends School; Nov. 22. He was principal from 1950 to 1973, but continued to teach art history and religion there until 1989, when he was over 80. Earlier he had been an attorney, practicing in Boston and New York, before beginning a teaching career in the late 1930s. A Quaker, he was active with the American Friends Service Committee.

Edward J. Budzyko Jr. ME’43, Edina, Minn., a retired mechanical engineer who held management positions in various companies; Oct. 22. During World War II he served with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific theater.

Stuart H. Carroll C’43, West Chester, Pa., a retired Penn figure, both cherished by the alumni and popular within the administration, who had served the University in many roles over several decades; Jan. 25. He began his career at the Philadelphia Textile Institute, now Philadelphia University, before returning to Penn in 1955 as director of the Campaign for the Law School. He went on to what is now the Department of Development and Alumni Relations to serve in various positions, including director of alumni annual giving in 1958; director of development in 1968; assistant vice president for development and public relations, 1971; and assistant vice president for alumni relations, 1980. The following year he became executive vice president of the General Alumni Society. From 1962 to 1968 he served as secretary of the corporation (now secretary of the University). By official University account, he signed 21,641 diplomas and liked to note that thousands of copies of his signature hung on the walls of alumni homes and offices. After working at Penn for more than three decades, Stu Carroll retired in 1987, but continued in a part-time role until 1988. He remained active as an alumnus: for the Class of 1943 he served as class president, as class officer, as gift chair, and as a member of both the gifts and reunion committees. He was a Penn Phonathon Volunteer and was a member of the Friars Senior Society Graduate Board, the Penn Newman Center, and the Organized Classes Board. “Personable as well as professional, he was regarded as a skilled administrator who had a way of humanizing the University’s administrative bureaucracy,” recalled Michel T. Huber W’53 ASC’61, former general secretary of the General Alumni Society and director of alumni relations. In 1986, Stu Carroll was declared “Boss of the Day” by radio station WIP 610 AM, when nominated by his secretary, Kristina L. Clark, now director of operations for the Alumni Relations Office, who noted his “wonderful sense of humor and charming personality.” He received the Alumni Award of Merit in 1989 “in recognition of outstanding service to the University.” Stu Carroll was a board member of the Wayne Library and the Wayne Senior Center, where he volunteered for 28 years. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II and again during the Korean War. Two of his children are Elizabeth C. Hanson C’81 GEd’81 and J. Douglas Carroll C’74, whose son is Charles Carroll C’09.

Dr. Guerrant H. Ferguson Jr. M’43, Narberth, Pa., a physician who served on the staff of Bryn Mawr Hospital for 50 years; Feb. 3. At Penn he was a member of Phi Chi fraternity. He worked at the Veterans Administration, 1946-47, before opening a private practice in Bala Cynwyd in 1947. He was also on the teaching staff of what was the old Presbyterian Hospital. At Bryn Mawr he chaired the staff-admissions committee for 10 years. He had received the Legion of Honor of Four Chaplains in 1984. During World War II he was a captain in the U.S. Medical Corps, 1944-46. He served under Adm. Chester W. Nimitz and was assigned to the fleet headquarters in Guam; he also served in the U.S. Army occupation of Japan, where he was assigned to Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s headquarters.

Dr. Ammon G. Kershner Jr. Ed’43 GEd’44 G’47 Gr’52, a retired professor of English at West Chester University; Exton, Pa., Dec. 30. He had also taught at Ursinus College.

William P. Parsons WEv’43, Ocean City, N.J., June 25, 2006.

Peter C. Spinelli W’43, Bellerose, N.Y., May 27, 2005.

Dr. W. North Sterrett M’43, New Oxford, Pa., Nov. 10.


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1944

Dr. Harold M. Kaller D’44, Newington, Conn., a dentist who had maintained a practice in Meriden from 1946 to 1996; Oct. 20. He was past president of the Meriden Dental Society and a former trustee of Meriden Public Library. He was a past vice president of Temple B’Nai Abraham. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Dental Corps as a captain in the Philippines, Japan, and Korea.

Dr. Jacob H. Ludwig Jr. D’44, Bethlehem, Pa., Aug. 11.

Gwen D. Lysaught CW’44, Lansdowne, Pa., Nov. 14.

Neal K. Schnaitter W’44, Albuquerque, N.M., Jan. 22, 2006.

Ralph J. Taussig W’44, Huntingdon Valley, Pa., an international-investment banker for 45 years; Jan. 11. For 30 years he commuted to New York; since the late 1980s he had worked from his home office. A frequent traveler abroad, he spoke French, German, and Arabic. For the last 10 years he lectured on current events and politics at Masterman School in Philadelphia. He chaired the Jewish Welfare Board of Philadelphia for 18 years. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army’s 29th Infantry Division. He landed at Omaha Beach on D-Day and participated in campaigns in northern France and the Rhineland, as well as in the liberation of the Buchenwald concentration camp. He later prosecuted war criminals in Germany, and remained active with the USO, organizing events and activities for military personnel. One of his sons is Andrew R. Taussig WG’78.


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1945

Peter J. Blake Ar’45, Branford, Conn., architectural writer and publisher; Dec. 5. He was curator of architecture and design at the Museum of Modern Art from 1948 to 1950. He then wrote books on Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Philip Johnson. From 1950 to 1972 he edited the now-defunct Architectural Forum before founding his own magazine, Architecture Plus, where he worked until 1975. He both critiqued and criticized Modernism—a term he despised—in books such as Form Follows Fiasco: Why Modern Architecture Hasn’t Worked (1977). Also an architect, Peter Blake designed many houses in the Hamptons on Long Island, including his own. One of his most-discussed designs, however, was never built; in 1949 he conceived an “Ideal Museum” for his friend Jackson Pollock, envisioning a spare building behind the artist’s East Hampton house in which paintings would be set between mirrored walls, creating a sense of infinite views. His 1993 memoir, No Place Like Utopia: Modern Architecture and the Company We Kept, vividly chronicled his relationships with a wide variety of artists, architects, and writers. He also taught architecture at several schools and was chair of architecture and planning at Catholic University in Washington from 1979 to 1986.

Dr. Wesley E. Bramnick C’45 D’47, Huntingdon Valley, Pa., Sept. 14.

Francys Zaltzman Leeds Ed’45, Haverford, Pa., Feb. 16. Her daughter is Dana J. Leeds CW’72 and one of her sons is Brandon Y. Leeds GEE’84.


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1946

John L. Krupp WEv’46, Lansdale, Pa., June 22, 2006.


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1947

Edwin S. Klein W’47, Flushing, N.Y., Jan. 10, 2006.

Dr. Robert Schwarzmann V’47, Culver City, Calif., Dec. 20.

Max M. Solomon WEv’47, Audubon, Pa., a certified public accountant and tax collector for Abington from 1990 to 2005; Jan. 24. He became tax collector in 1990, vowing to restore credibility to the office after his two predecessors had been charged with stealing tax receipts. During World War II he was a medic in the U.S. Army.

Dr. Herbert Tauger C’47, Newport Beach, Calif., a retired psychologist and administrator of drug and alcohol abuse programs in California and at military bases in Europe; Nov. 25. He had also maintained a private practice in San Bernardino. During World War II he was a cryptanalysis technician in the U.S. Army.


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1948

Percival Harris Jr. Ar’48, Bay Head, N.J., Jan. 25.

Stanley Novak Ed’48 GEd’50, Media, Pa., Oct. 21.

George W. Ryan C’48, Ardmore, Pa., a Philadelphia public school teacher for 29 years; Dec. 21. He taught English at Sayre Junior High School in West Philadelphia and at Lamberton School in Overbrook Park, until his retirement in 1982. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps as an X-ray technician. His medical unit landed on Omaha Beach after D-Day and, nearly a year later, treated survivors of the Buchenwald, Bergen-Belsen, and Dachau concentration camps. In his X-ray lab he developed some of the first film footage of the Allies entering the camps.

Dr. Cletus W. Schwegman GM’48, Gladwyne, Pa., professor emeritus of surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; Dec. 8. He joined the hospital’s staff and the medical school’s faculty as chief surgical resident in 1946. He continued to perform surgeries until he was 70, and taught in the surgical clinic until Jan. 2006. For nearly 25 years Dr. Schwegman was secretary of the American Board of Surgery, and traveled around the country administering oral boards. While earning his medical degree he had worked as a pharmacist. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy Medical Corps, including time spent at a military hospital in India. He remained in the Army Reserve until 1962. His son is Dr. Cletus W. Schwegman Jr. D’77.

Richard Srebnick W’48, Franklin, Tenn., Nov. 7, 2004.


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1949

Max L. Burdick W’49, Melbourne, Fla., Nov. 22, 2005.

Warwick M. Carter W’49, Washington, a retired chartered life underwriter; Dec. 18. At Penn he was a member of Delta Psi fraternity, St. Anthony Hall. He and his five brothers also owned a small shopping center in Arlington, Va., known as Lee Heights Shops. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in the American occupation of Japan and later served in the U.S. Army Reserve, retiring as a captain.

Dr. Andrew N. Conte GM’49, Trenton, N.J., April 2004.

Gabriel D. Dietrich W’49, Norwalk, Conn., a fiduciary accountant for the Greenwich law firm of Hirschberg, Pettengill, Strong & Nagle, where he had worked for 30 years; Aug. 25. During World War II he served in the U.S. Eighth Air Force, 445th Bomber Group, as a B-24 navigator.

Dr. George W. Fisher V’49, Newtown Square, Pa., a veterinarian who had maintained a practice in Radnor for over 35 years; Nov. 19.

Dr. Robert C. Jones W’49 WG’55 Gr’58, Wayne, Pa., founding director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics from 1967 to 1982 and an emeritus associate professor of statistics and health-care systems in the Wharton School; Jan. 13. He joined the Penn faculty in 1954 as an instructor in statistics and became an assistant professor in 1958, and was promoted to associate professor in 1971; he was appointed emeritus in 1994. Dr. Jones was one of the first recipients of the Anvil Awards for excellence in teaching at Wharton in 1974 and received a Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1979. He also held appointments in the Schools of Medicine and Nursing. He served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and received a Bronze Star for safely leading soldiers through a mine field. His daughters are Dr. Kathryn S. Jones C’78, Carolyn Jones Gould PT’81, and Laura Jones Reed C’85 Nu’98.

Howard Leventon W’49, Bala Cynwyd, Pa., Nov. 1.

James J. McGinley W’49, Norristown, Pa., October.

Dr. Milton Miller GEd’49 GrEd’62, Philadelphia, Oct. 2004.

Dr. A. Thomas Richie M’49, Doylestown, Pa., Aug. 28, 2005.

Arthur W. Tompkins Jr. WG’49, Seattle, a retired regional vice president of State Farm Companies; Aug. 23, 2006.


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1950

Alex G. Baxter W’50, West Chester, Pa., Dec. 10.

Jefferson Craig CCC’50, Audubon, Pa., a retired engineer and accountant; Dec. 6. He had worked as an engineer at factories near Philadelphia, then in the early 1990s, joined the accounting department of Stroehmann Bakeries in East Norriton, where he remained until retiring in 2002. He was treasurer of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, a service organization. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army, Stateside.

James H. Davis WG’50, Sewickley, Pa., Oct. 27.

C. Edward Goebel WEv’50, Lansdale, Pa., Jan. 29, 2006.

Dr. Richard C. Newsham V’50, West End, N.C., a veterinarian who had maintained a practice in Gettysburg, Pa., for 29 years; Sept. 6.

1951 | Russell A. Altenberger G’51 Orono, Maine, a retired teacher of mathematics and statistics at Iowa State University and the University of Maine, where he established the computing center in 1961; Oct. 24. He was also an antiquarian bookseller.

Henry Bialecki WG’51, Cheshire, Conn., Dec. 5.

Mervin G. Holland Jr. W’51, Harrisburg, Pa., former president and CEO of Millers Mutual Insurance Co.; Jan. 5. He worked 45 years in the insurance industry, joining Millers in 1967 and served as president and chief executive officer from 1972 to 1994. He was a director of the Pennsylvania Manufacturers Association and PMA Insurance Group of Philadelphia for 17 years; he served as president of the Improved Risk Mutuals of Charlotte, N.C., and was past chair of the Pennsylvania Association of Mutual Insurance Companies.

Gerald F. McMahon WG’51, Manassas, Va., Sept. 26.

Clifford W. O’Key WG’51, Tucson, Ariz., a retired city manager; Jan. 25. He was manager of a number of cities, including Rahway, N.J., Norman, Okla., Little Rock, Ark., Miami Beach, Fla., Tucson, Ariz., and Las Cruces, N.M.

Edward A. Wilson WEv’51, Oxford, Pa., Sept. 10.

Norman E. Wright Jr. G’51, Palm City, Fla., a longtime municipal-bond dealer on Wall Street, where he worked with several firms, including Alex Brown and Sons and Merrill Lynch; Feb. 18, 2006. He had served in the U.S. Army.


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1952

Bruce W. Brown W’52, Vero Beach, Fla., a retired vice president of Merrill Lynch; June 23, 2006. He first worked with E.F. Hutton Co., and then with Merrill Lynch in Lawrenceville, N.J. He was a board member of the Children’s Home Society in Trenton. In Florida he was board member and president of both Southwinds at The Moorings and The Moorings Club. He served on the boards of the Indian River Hospital Foundation, Harbor Branch Oceanic Institution, Fort Pierce, and Indian River Estates. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army.

Eugene Chestnut W’52, Cherry Hill, N.J., Feb. 14, 2004.

Joanne Healy Hines SW’52, New Hartford, Conn., psychiatric social-work supervisor for the Delaware State Hospital from 1975 to 1994; July 20, 2006. A committed Democrat, she ran for state representative in 1970 and state senate in 1972. She served as a delegate to the state conventions of 1972 and 1974, and as vice chair of her representative district.

Thomas J. Johnston G’52, Castleton-on-Hudson, N.Y., June 30, 2002.

Dr. John F. Patt V’52, Gilbertsville, Pa., a retired veterinarian who had maintained a practice for 45 years; Aug. 31. He was a life member of the Boyertown Museum of Historic Vehicles. An authority on vintage motorcycles, he was a chief judge and past president of the Antique Motorcycle Club of America.

Dr. Heber E. Yeagley M’52, Wesford, Pa., March 8, 2006.

John R. Zartarian WEv’52, Philadelphia, Sept. 28, 2002. His son is Dr. Ronald W. Zartarian D’80.


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1953

David Fink L’53, Irwin, Pa., Nov. 22, 2005.

Sheldon Fox Ar’53, Fairfield, Conn., a co-founder of the Kohn Pedersen Fox architectural firm, of which he was managing partner for 21 years; Dec. 16. He began his career in 1955, as a draftsman for Kahn & Jacobs, Architects, where he later became a partner. In 1972 he moved to John Carl Warnecke & Associates as senior vice president. Four years later he teamed with A. Eugene Kohn Ar’53 GAr’57 and William Pedersen, to found Kohn Pedersen Fox Architects, which became known as KPF. He served as manager. The tightly managed partnership quickly rose to the top rank of American architectural firms and now has offices in New York, London, and Shanghai. He oversaw some of its prominent projects, including the World Bank headquarters in Washington; 333 West Wacker Drive in Chicago; and a cluster of buildings for ABC television on the West Side of Manhattan.

Dr. Richard L. Heberling G’53, Park City, Utah, a virologist who co-founded Virus Reference Lab, Inc., in San Antonio; Nov. 25, 2005. He began his career in simian and non-human primate virology in 1957 at the University of Pittsburgh. From 1963 to 1967 he was head of the simian-virus laboratory at the National Cancer Institute. In 1967 he joined the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research in San Antonio, as foundation scientist and assistant director of the Simian Virus Reference Laboratory. During the next 20 years Dr. Heberling and his colleagues advanced diagnostic virology and serologic testing. After retiring in 1988 he co-founded Virus Reference Laboratory, for the testing of animals for zoos, veterinarians, and research, pharmaceutical, and biotech organizations worldwide. It also became a reference laboratory for WHO. He retired in 2004.


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1954

Lt. Col. David O. Boxwell D’54, Sequim, Wash., Jan. 4.

Alfred H. Cole WEF’54, Dublin, Ohio, Dec. 16, 2004.

Dr. Robert D. Flowers V’54, Mechanicsburg, Pa., a veterinarian who had maintained a practice in the Harrisburg area for over 40 years; Jan. 11. In 1965 he opened the West Shore Veterinary Hospital. He founded the Willow Mill Veterinary Clinic in 1985. He was a former president of the Capital City Veterinary Medical Association and the Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Association. From 1977 to 1982 he was the local director of the American Animal Hospital Association. And he served on the Pennsylvania board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. Dr. Flowers was a member of the University’s Commonwealth Relations Council and class agent for the Class of 1954. During World War II he served as a forward observer in the U.S. Army field artillery, stationed in the Philippines.

Dr. William H. Frank GM’54, Davidsville, Pa., Dec. 21.

Dr. Fred D. Hagerty V’54, Vero Beach, Fla., a retired ophthalmologist who had maintained a practice in York, Pa., from 1967 to 1991; Jan. 26. He had earlier maintained a family practice in York. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army. One of his daughters is Linda L. Hagerty CW’75.

Dr. John W. Robertson GM’54, Wyncote, Pa., a retired surgeon and civil-rights activist; Jan. 27. For more than 20 years he was on the surgical staffs of Mercy Douglas Hospital and Albert Einstein Medical Center, while also maintaining a general practice in West Philadelphia. He became chief of surgery at John F. Kennedy Memorial Hospital in 1975 and later served as medical director. At his retirement in 1996 he was adviser to the hospital’s board chair. The first African American appointed to the Pennsylvania State Board of Medical Education and Licensure, Dr. Robertson served on the board from 1968 to 1980, chairing it for three years. As an activist he served on the Philadelphia Martin Luther King Non-violence Committee and was a lifelong member of the NAACP. He participated in the March on Washington in 1963, and he attended the first Million Man March in 1995.

Alan A. Steinberg ME’54, Bala Cynwyd, Pa., a retired business owner and a real estate developer for over 50 years; Dec. 2. He joined his family’s metal-fabrication business, American Steel Engineering Co. in Philadelphia, becoming president of the firm at his father’s death. While working at American Steel, he was also a partner for many years in Frankel Enterprises, developing multi-family buildings in the area, including the William Penn House and the Kennedy House in Philadelphia, and golf communities in Florida. Since the early 1990s he built single-family homes with partners in Philadelphia and on the Main Line. His wife is Joan Lepow Steinberg Ed’54 and his son is Laurence L. Steinberg W’77.

Dr. S. Steven Wolfson M’54, West Hartford, Conn., a retired physician who had maintained a practice there for more than 35 years; Dec. 22. Early in his career he had focused on forensic medicine, serving as an expert witness in Connecticut courts. He was a longtime member of the West Hartford Republican Town Committee and was a justice of the peace in the Town of West Hartford. He had been a second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force Reserve.


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1955

Dr. Norman Bernstein C’55, El Paso, Tex., May 21, 2006.

Charles L. Crangle G’55, Delmar, N.Y., Oct. 27.


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1956

Joseph J. Dempsey WEv’56, Maple Glen, Pa., Feb. 12, 2005.

Paul S. Dobkin W’56, New York, Feb. 8.

David H. Freeman GAr’56, King of Prussia, Pa., the former general manager of Yerkes Associates, Inc., a consulting engineering firm in Bryn Mawr; Oct. 14.

Ruth Kidd WEv’56, Claymont, Del., Nov. 4, 2005.

Norman E. Lauer WG’56, Arlington, Va., May 12, 2006.

Maurice J. Madden III Ed’56, Newark, Del., November.

Dr. Robert G. Mulholland EE’56 GEE’63 GrE’65, Medford, N.J., Sept. 9.

William A. Rogers WEv’56, Moorestown, N.J., Oct. 17.

Maung S. Tin W’56, King of Prussia, Pa., June 8, 2006. He had worked for the J.C. Penney Co., Inc.

Nicasio V. Ursino WEv’56, Aldan, Pa., June 28, 2005.

Louise Reber Weddell CCC’56, Langhorne, Pa., Nov. 3.


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1957

Dr. William B. Cleary D’57, Somerville, N.J., Nov. 16, 2005.

Robert P. Floyd Jr. W’57, Wayne, Pa., a human-resources executive at Safeguard Scientific in Philadelphia, until his retirement in 1993; Nov. 25. He was past chair of the Radnor Township Planning Commission. Active with the Devon Horse Show and County Fair for 40 years, he served on its board.

Dr. Alfred Lazarus GM’57, Wilmington, Del., a gastroenterologist who had maintained a practice for nearly 35 years and who had served as a clinical professor of medicine at Thomas Jefferson University; Dec. 16. He was chief of gastroenterology at the Medical Center of Delaware for many years. He served on the board of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Delaware for over 25 years, until 1996. In World War II he was a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army Medical Administrative Corps, serving in the Philippines and occupied Japan.

George G. Tormey W’57, New York, Dec. 12, 2005.


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1958

Dr. John D. O’Leary GD’58, Newark, Del., Feb. 3.

Morton B. Plant W’58, Baltimore, a retired metal-recycling executive; Jan. 10. Known by his childhood nickname of “Sonny,” he began his career in the scrap-metal industry at H. Klaff and Co. in Baltimore, his family’s business. He retired in 1998 as board chair of Keywell Corp. He had served as president of the Institute of Scrap Iron and Steel, which honored him with its lifetime-achievement award in 2005. He was a board member of the University of Maryland Medical Systems, and of Mercantile Bank & Trust. Known for his charitable endeavors, especially in the Jewish community, he had recently served as co-chair of the capital campaign for the Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore and as chair of its audit committee, and from 1999 to 2002 he chaired its board. “Thanks to his many years of leadership and wise counsel, he integrated the highest Jewish values with a practical, results-oriented approach that made a difference in millions of lives,” said Marc B. Terrill, its current president. In 1993 he chaired the North American Maccabi Youth Games, played in Maryland. One of his daughters is Laurie P. Stagnitta C’85, whose husband is Jim Stagnitta C’84. Sonny’s brother is Arnold I. Plant W’53.


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1959

Walter E. Arrison GEd’59, Southampton, Pa., a retired administrator with the Philadelphia School District and a professor of accounting at St. Joseph’s University; Feb. 8.

Richard A. Doran G’59, Philadelphia, Pa., retired director of communications for Independence Blue Cross; Jan. 23. He was the executive assistant to Pennsylvania Governor Milton J. Shapp during the 1970s; he wrote speeches and helped shape policy. Then as Philadelphia’s commerce director in the 1980s, he solicited new businesses and helped retain old ones, while finding new ways to promote the city, including developing slogans and boosting tourism and convention business. “Dick was the person you wanted to go to to influence public opinion or an editorial board,” Governor Edward G. Rendell C’65 Hon’00 told The Philadelphia Inquirer. “For decades and decades it was hard to think of a major civic venture launched without his participation.” In the early 1960s he had worked in the data-processing department of the Curtis Publishing Co. Also active in politics, he worked on the Kennedy presidential campaign in 1960 and, recently, campaigned for U.S. Rep. Patrick Murphy, who ran for office after returning from the Iraq war. Dick Doran served on the boards of the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Opera Company of Philadelphia, and he was chair of the Curtis Institute.

Edward J. Lewis W’59 L’62, Pittsburgh, chair and CEO of Oxford Development Co., the largest privately held commercial real estate firm in the Pittsburgh area; Nov. 30. His signature accomplishment, according to The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, was the construction in 1982 of One Oxford Centre, a 45-story octagon of silver-painted aluminum and glass, which he financed without any tenants; it is the third-tallest downtown structure. He supported many charities, including the United Jewish Federation, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, and the ALS Foundation of Western Pennsylvania.


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1960

Dr. Donald D. Ginand V’60, Brookfield, Conn., a veterinarian who practiced in Kingston, Mass., and New Haven, Conn., before serving as a captain in the U.S. Army Veterinary Medical Corps in California.; Oct. 2, 2005. His wife is June Fridy Ginand Nu’60.

Nathaniel K. Kolb GAr’60, Dallas, June 2006.


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1961

Dr. Edward J. Gralla V’61, Raleigh, N.C., a toxicologist and former assistant professor of comparative medicine and pharmacology at Yale University; Sept. 17. He began his research career as a toxicologist with Pfizer in Groton, Conn., where he was promoted to chief of toxicology and safety evaluation. He conducted research critical to proving the connection between thalidomide and birth defects while at Yale. After moving to North Carolina in 1977, he started his own expert-witness consulting business.


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1962

Lovell G. Crandall EE’65 GEE’73, Warrington, Pa., July 7, 2006. His wife is Sandra Galloway Crandall Nu’71 GNu’75.

Dr. Gary G. Nicholas M’65 GM’72, Upper Milford, Pa., a vascular surgeon and director of surgical education at Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pa., for 21 years; Jan. 22. He had earlier taught general and vascular surgery at Penn State University College of Medicine at Hershey for 10 years.

Dr. Donald A. Krueckeberg GCP’62 Gr’66, New Brunswick, N.J., a professor and associate dean for master’s and professional programs at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University; Dec. 15. He served as editor of what is now the Journal of the American Planning Association, 1976-78. He wrote Urban Planning Analysis: Methods and Models (1973), An Introduction to Planning History in the United States (1983), and The American Planner: Biographies and Recollections (2nd edition, 1994). Active in community life, he was vice president of Middlesex Interfaith Partners with the Homeless and served on the boards of the New Jersey Alliance for Affordable Housing and the Camden Lutheran Housing Corp. For over a decade he served on the Highland Park Zoning Board of Adjustment.

Thomas M. Sylk W’62, Malvern, Pa., former president of Carpet Warehouse Outlet in Philadelphia; Dec. 3.

Dr. Elizabeth A. Schaeffer Teichler Nu’62 GNu’65, Lafayette, Colo., assistant professor of nursing at Beth El College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Colorado-Colorado Springs; Jan. 13. She was the family nurse practitioner at Brighton Senior Center in Brighton, from 1994 to 2004. She was a past president of the Mental Health Center of Boulder County. Dr. Teichler was instrumental in founding the Boulder Aquatic Masters and became the club’s first president. An accomplished athlete, she served on ski patrols at Smuggler’s Notch in Vermont, and Copper Mountain and Eldora in Colorado. She was a frequent competitor in triathlon, Ironman, and Ultraman events.


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1963

Pamela Zartarian Kitabjian NTS’63, Broomall, Pa., a retired nurse; March 24, 2006. From 1963 to 1965 she worked at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. She worked for Frederick Erdman Association, a doctor’s office specializing in physical medicine and rehabilitation, from 1975 until retiring in 1998. She was a charter member of the Knar Armenian Choral Group, beginning in 1960. And she had served as translator for two Armenian girls at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia who were victims of the 1988 Armenian earthquake.

John J. Lynch W’63, Dublin, Ohio, former comptroller for London Kitchens in Columbus; March 23, 2004.


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1964

Dr. Frederick M. Seilkop GD’64, DeLand, Fla., an orthodontist who had maintained a practice there over 30 years; Dec. 27. He served in the U.S. Army, 1955-58.

Dennis J. Woywood GEE’64, Albuquerque, N.M., a retired electrical engineer who had worked in the government, broadcast, and defense divisions of RCA in New Jersey for 27 years; Oct. 30.


1966

Dr. Paul B. Ambrose Gr’66, Chambersburg, Pa., Dec. 24.

Charles W. Beehler GEd’66, Media, Pa., Jan. 24.

Dr. Robert L. Nixon D’66, Agoura Hills, Calif., a dentist, who became known as a “dentist to the stars” for his work on celebrities in Beverly Hills; Jan 23. He practiced as an endodontist and oral surgeon in Wilmington, Del., from 1966 to 1990, when he moved to California. During the 1980s he began pioneering aesthetic dentistry by developing techniques and materials now used worldwide to give what he dubbed the “perfect smile.” He was a senior fellow and founding member of the American Society for Dental Aesthetics. Dr. Nixon was credited with perfecting the use of porcelain veneers.


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1967

Dr. Robert F. Hoffman Gr’67, Medford, N.J., a retired chemical engineer; Nov. 7. Specializing in polymers, he was an engineer, technical manager, and senior business manager with Thiokol Corp., now Rohm & Haas. He was a technical director and senior business manager at ICI Americas (now Huntsman Corp.). He was an adjunct professor in chemical engineering at Rowan University.

Harold Levine W’67, Goshen, N.Y., president of Middletown Footwear, Inc.; Feb. 17. He was a leader in the Boy Scouts and was a former president of the Jewish Federation of Orange County. Harold’s extensive Penn family includes his father, Jacques Levine W’43; his son, Eric J. Levine C’01; his sister, Minna S. Levine OT’72; and his brothers, David O. Levine C’76 and Alan Levine W’70, whose wife is Alison Newman C’83.


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1968

Harry D. Barrell GCP’68, Harrisburg, Pa., Dec. 15.


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1969

Dr. Stephen L. Bosniak C’69, New York, an eye and cosmetic surgeon; Feb. 8. He was an attending surgeon at the Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital and maintained private practices in Manhattan and Great Neck, N.Y. In 1985 he published the first article written on the effects of Botox. He was the author of over 100 scientific articles and three books, including, most recently, Beautifeye: State of the Art Methods to Enhance and Rejuvenate the Eyes, Brows and Face. He edited the nine-volume series Advances in Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the textbook Principles and Practice of Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery, and the first two volumes of The Video Atlas of Cosmetic Blepharoplasty. In 2002 Dr. Bosniak received the senior achievement award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology. His philanthropic work included Orbis International and the Skin Cancer Foundation. “He stimulated those of us around him to try and keep up with him,” recalled Dr. Mark Rubin of Beverly Hills, Calif. “His intellectual curiosity helped so many physicians become better at what we all do.” Stephen’s brother is Mark R. Bosniak C’76 and his sister is Karen B. Patou C’79. His cousins include Marcia S. Wexler CW’73 GEd’74 and Dr. Jan V. Levitan C’69 M’73.


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1970

Dr. John H. Davis GrEd’70, Rumson, N.J., Nov. 19.


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1971

Don Benton G’71, Souderton, Pa., Dec. 4.


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1972

Dr. Percy C. Helem Jr. C’72, Philadelphia, an obstetrician and gynecologist who had maintained a practice for 25 years; Nov. 29. At Penn he was founding president of the Black Studies League. As a physician he was affiliated with the old Fitzgerald Mercy Hospital. Dr. Helem was a past regional president of the Student National Medical Association.

Dr. Alfred M. Loeb GrE’72, Pittsford, N.Y., Oct. 25.


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1973

Hillery S. de Ben WG’73, Mountain Top, Pa., Dec. 26, 2005.


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1974

Nina E. Yahr CW’74, New York, Jan. 28. She was a devoted volunteer who for 15 years delivered meals for God’s Love We Deliver.


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1976

Dr. Mario Caceres GrS’76, Harleysville, Pa., Sept. 24.


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 1977

Dr. Lisa M. Occhiolini C’77 Gr’07, King of Prussia, Pa., Jan. 31. Her husband is Gregory D. Saul C’77 and her sister is Nina M. Occhiolini C’78.


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 1978

William D. Sinrich C’78, London, Feb. 2.

Maryellen Adams Yurkow C’78, Haddonfield, N.J., a partner at the law firm of Fox & Yurkow in Audubon, Pa.; Nov. 25. She founded the South Jersey chapter of the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition after she was diagnosed with the disease in 2000.


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1980

Alan Yung WG’80, Yonkers, N.Y., Feb. 13, 2005.


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1981

Sylvia H. Wexler Rosenthal WEv’81, Philadelphia, Sept. 22. She managed the drugstore owned by her first husband, the late Solomon Wexler. Her husband is Edgar Rosenthal C’51 G’52 and her daughter is Deborah Wexler Sarachek CW’64.


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1982

Joel H. Winston L’82, Prairie Village, Kan., partner at the Kansas City law firm of Polsinelli, Shalton, Welte & Suelthaus; June 15, 2006. He specialized in real estate securitizations.


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1983

Steven J. Brodman W’83, Freehold, N.J., Sept. 22.

Edward J. Kobetich WG’83, Hutchinson, Kan., Jan. 15.


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1988

James A. Robles EAS’88, Philadelphia, a civil engineer with Pennoni Associates; Nov. 26. At Penn he was a member of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity and played varsity volleyball. In 1988 he helped found the Fins Aquatics Club, for local gay water-polo players, and became its head coach; it evolved into a competitive, coed swim team and won 50 medals in the international Gay Games in 2006. He won his first Country-Western world swing-dance championship in the Netherlands in 2002.


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2000

Lisa Lynn Bissett WG’00, Boston, Feb. 13. She had worked as a strategy specialist for McKinsey & Co., and Clean Harbors, before starting a floral-design business, Blooming Color. And she was a volunteer at the Tufts-New England Medical Center. Her husband is Matthew W. McLeod G’99.


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2006

Carlton W. Hayes WAM’06, West Chester, Pa., head of information technology at Synthes, where he had worked for more than 20 years; Jan. 6. He began his career in Monument, Colo., and eventually headed information technology there. In 2000 he moved to the North American headquarters in West Chester.


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Faculty and Staff

Stuart H. Carroll. See Class of 1943.

Dr. Anna-Marie Chirico, Philadelphia, a retired internist at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and professor emeritus at the School of Medicine, where she chaired the Medical Board; Feb. 4. She spent several years in private practice before joining the faculty at HUP in 1959. She also maintained an internal-medicine practice at HUP until she retired in 1987. Much loved by students and faculty for her “unique combination of absolute pragmatism coupled with warmth, compassion, wit, and humor,” she was honored for excellence in teaching with the Medical Student Government Award in 1967, the Lindback Award in 1982, and, by the vote of her students, the Teaching Honor Roll in 1983. In 1998 her friend and former student, Dr. Andrea M. Baldeck M’79 GM’84, and her husband, William M. Hollis Jr., created an endowment at the Morris Arboretum in her honor. Dr. Chirico volunteered for years at the Morris Arboretum in the micropropagation laboratory, where she produced cloning plants for medical research. The Chirico Horticultural Research Endowment helps fund the continuation of her work at the arboretum. In her retirement she spent many years volunteering her time to tutor high-school students in science and mathematics in after-school programs.

Dr. Henry Hiz, Philadelphia, professor emeritus of linguistics; Dec. 19. He came to Penn 1951 as a visiting lecturer in philosophy. In 1959 he co-directed a research project with the famous Dr. Zellig S. Harris C’30 G’32 Gr’34, the founding head of the linguistics department, that resulted in the first computer program that could analyze the grammar of a human language; today we know this as a spelling and grammar check. Dr. Hiz permanently joined the faculty as an associate professor of linguistics in 1960. He was promoted to professor in 1964. From 1966 to 1973 he chaired the graduate group in linguistics, and retired in 1988. He was editor of the Formal Linguistics Series, 1970-71. He wrote Questions: Studies in Linguistics and Philosophy (1978) and co-wrote Papers on Syntax (1981). He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1976. Born in Russia to Polish parents, he was a member of the Polish resistance against the Nazi occupation from 1940 to 1945.

Raoul A. Ibarguen. See Class of 1941.

Dr. Robert C. Jones. See Class of 1949.

Dr. Cletus W. Schwegman. See Class of 1948.

John Stiegman, Princeton, N.J., head men’s football coach from 1960 to 1964; Oct. 31. As an assistant coach at Princeton University in 1946, he “had engineered the Tigers’ stunning 17-14 upset of Penn,” according to Dan Rottenberg C’64, in Fight On, Pennsylvania: A Century of Red and Blue Football (1985). He became coach at Rutgers University at age 33, the youngest major college coach in the country at that time. Under his leadership from 1956 to 1959, Rutgers compiled a 22-15 record, including 8-1 in 1958 and 6-3 in 1959. When he came to Penn in 1960, he had known only one losing season in his career. He returned the team to a single-wing offense following former coach Steve Sebo’s multiple-offense strategy, according to Football: The Ivy League Origins of an American Obsession, by Mark F. Bernstein (2001). With 12 victories and 33 defeats during Stiegman’s five-year tenure, Dan Rottenberg, then a team member, described it as “the worst period in the sport’s long and illustrious history at Penn” [See “Winning, Losing, Learning,” Nov|Dec 2002]. However, the late Philadelphia Inquirer columnist Frank Dolson W’54 (see “Obituaries,” May/June) claimed that the greatest sports contest he witnessed in his long career was Penn’s surprising 7-2 upset in 1963 over an undefeated Harvard team, which had been celebrated on the cover of Sports Illustrated two days earlier. Coach Stiegman’s other memorable win for Penn was a 15-12 victory over Yale at New Haven in 1962. Known for his complex strategies and strong work ethic, he quietly followed his former Penn players’ careers through the years and told them at an informal reunion nearly 40 years later, “You kept coming out to play, even when you were losing. That’s what’s really interesting—much more than the guys who were winning.” He also served as head coach at Iowa Wesleyan and was an assistant coach at Pittsburgh and Army. And he had worked in development at Paul Smith’s College in New York state. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy.

Sir John R. H. Thouron, Unionville, Pa., founder of the Thouron Awards; Feb. 6. He was born in Cookham, U.K., of an American father who was taken to England as a child, and a British mother. At the outbreak of World War II he enlisted in the Gordon Highlanders regiment and was subsequently commissioned in the Black Watch. Later he was seconded to the Special Operations Executive, which sent personnel, including both British and escaped European military, into Nazi-occupied countries to sabotage communications and set up resistance movements. For a time he was seconded to the General Staff, Scottish Command, to undertake instructing the Glasgow Home Guard battalions in street and house-to-house fighting. Later he helped in foiling Nazi attempts to massacre prisoners of war as the war drew to its close; this involved many parachute jumps behind enemy lines, including at night, near POW camps. Inspired by British and American troops fighting side-by-side, he sought a way to foster continued Anglo-American friendship through an academic exchange. In 1960 he and his wife, the late Esther duPont, created the Thouron University of Pennsylvania Fund for British-American Exchange, which has become one of the world’s leading graduate-fellowship programs. The Thouron Scholars receive funding for studies in any field of their choosing; over 700 students, two-thirds of them British, have studied abroad at either Penn or at British universities. In recognition of his work for the Thouron Awards, he was awarded a CBE in 1967, and in 1976 was knighted by Queen Elizabeth during her visit to Philadelphia for the American Bicentennial. His son, John J. Thouron (known as “Tiger”), who devoted more than 30 years of work to the awards, died in 2006 [see “Obituaries,”]. Known internationally for his gardens at Doe Run, Sir John took what were originally open fields and created a series of gardens that annually attract thousands of horticulturists and garden clubs.


Profiles : Events : Notes : Obituaries



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