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July|August 2008

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Faculty & Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1926

Dr. Elizabeth Kirk Rose M’26 GM’30, Kennett Square, Pa., associate professor emerita of community medicine and pediatrics; February 23. At Penn she was a member of the women’s varsity swim team and at her death was the oldest alumna of the University. For two decades Dr. Rose was a practicing pediatrician at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and a member of the faculty at the School of Medicine. She also served on the staff of both the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the old Presbyterian Hospital. In 1950 she was appointed to head the Division of Maternal and Child Health at the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. In 1956 she joined the Penn faculty in the Department of Community Health and helped lay the groundwork for involving medical students and residents in community-based learning and outreach. A champion for women, she hosted a picnic for women medical students and alumnae of the Medical School in 1962, which evolved into the annual Elizabeth Kirk Rose Women in Medicine Dinner to bring Medical School alumnae back to campus to advise and mentor women medical students. Dr. Rose and her husband, Dr. Edward Rose C’19 M’21 GM’25, retired from their respective practices and faculty positions at Penn in 1974; he died in 1987. In addition to mentoring, Dr. Elizabeth Rose served as secretary of the Class of 1926 until her death. She was a member of the Penn Alumnae Association, the Penn Rehabilitation Commission, and the Women’s Faculty Club, where she served as president, 1968-70. The recipient of an Alumni Award of Merit in 1982 and the Medical School’s Alumni Service Award, she and her husband were granted the school’s highest honor, the Distinguished Graduate Award, in 1983. She was active in many professional and civic organizations. In 1993 she received the Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvania Award, established to honor outstanding women in recognition of their leadership and contributions to the state. One of her sons is Dr. Edward K. Rose M’57.

Alexander L. Rosenthal W’26, Elkins Park, Pa., a retired partner with the accounting firm of Goldenberg Rosenthal LLP, and for many years the oldest practicing accountant in Pennsylvania; Jan. 30. Although he officially retired in 1989, he continued to work with long-term clients for 12 more years, until the age of 96. His daughter-in-law is Lynn Harrison Pories C’46, whose grandson is Scott Harris C’96.


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1927

Alyce Emurian Michaud Ed’27, Penn Valley, Pa., March 18. While at Penn on a full scholarship, she worked as a singer at the International House. She appeared in Broadway-bound musicals in Philadelphia and one New York play before marrying Abner Michaud, whose family restaurant, Chez Michaud on Walnut Street, was popular with graduating Penn seniors and their families during the 1930s. As part of the Old Guard, she regularly participated in alumni weekends.


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1928

Wesley Van Nostrand Robinson W’28, Portland, Fla., a retired inland marine manager for the Insurance Company of North America; March 8.

1929

Robert M. Kronman C’29, Palm Beach, Fla., an attorney who had maintained a practice in Passaic, N.J., for 46 years; Feb. 24.


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1930

Lemuel A. Geyer C’30 L’33, Worcester, Pa., a retired executive of Sun Oil Co.; Feb. 15. At Penn he was elected spademan.


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1931

Anne Pennypacker Hamilton Ed’31, Malvern, Pa., Oct. 8.


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1932

Clarence L. Wagner W’32, Bloomingdale, N.Y., retired controller and assistant secretary of what is now Trudeau Institute, which he served for 26 years; Feb. 20. At Penn he was a member of Theta Chi fraternity.

1933

Dr. J. Morton Orman C’33 M’37, Wyncote, Pa., a family physician who had maintained a practice in Hatboro for over 52 years; Jan. 27. At his retirement in 1999 at the age of 87, he had been on the staff of Abington Memorial Hospital longer than any other physician there. During World War II he was a flight surgeon in the U.S. Army Air Corps at a base in Louisiana. One of his sons is James M. Orman C’60 and a granddaughter is Susan Orman Schnall C’92, whose husband is Richard J. Schnall W’91.

Harry E. Waber W’33, Wynnewood, Pa., Feb. 4.


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1934

Joseph W. Burk W’34 Hon’88, Scottsdale, Ariz., retired rowing coach at the University, a position he held for nearly two decades; Jan. 13. At Penn he played varsity football. Encouraged by then rowing coach Rusty Callow, he joined the crew team his sophomore year, later becoming captain. He went on to win the national and Canadian single sculls championship for four consecutive years (1937-40) and was two-time winner of the Diamond Sculls at the Henley Regatta (1938, 1939). Known as the “world’s greatest oarsman,” he received the James E. Sullivan Award in 1939 as the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States. He won the 1940 Olympic trials and was favored to triumph at the Helsinki Games, but they were cancelled due to World War II. During the war he commanded the PT boat 320 in the Pacific, sinking 26 enemy barges, for which he received the Navy Cross, Gold Star, Silver Star, and Bronze Star. His younger brother, James, who also rowed for Penn, became a PT boat skipper in the Pacific but was killed during the war. After coaching freshman crew at Yale University in the late 1940s, Joe returned to Penn to coach the varsity crew team from 1950 to 1969. He took the team to victory in the 1955 Grand Challenge Cup at England’s Henley Regatta and to three consecutive varsity eight Intercollegiate Rowing Association championships in the late 1960s, the first time Penn had won the title since 1900. Known also as a training innovator, he started weight-training programs for Penn rowers and pioneered the use of electronic equipment to measure the contributions of individual oarsmen on a boat. Elected to the U.S. Rowing Hall of Fame and the Penn Athletics Hall of Fame, he was honored in 2005 with a bronze bas relief created by Elizabeth Doering at the Penn Boathouse on Kelly Drive. [See “Portrait of a Legend” and “Rising to the Challenge,” July/Aug. 2005 (www.upenn.edu/gazette/0705).]

Dr. Theodore Livingston Hartridge M’34, Madison, Wis., a retired surgeon; Feb. 20. During World War II he served in Gen. George Patton’s 3rd U.S. Army Medical Corps. He established battle-area hospitals during the Battle of the Bulge, for which he was awarded two Bronze Stars and five battle stars. He was one of the first American medical officers to examine prisoners at the Buchenwald, Cham, and Mauthausen concentration camps. After the war he served at the Brooke Army Hospital in San Antonio, Tex. Following his retirement from the Army, he joined the surgical staff of the Jackson Clinic in Madison.

William B. Roberts W’34, Arlington, Va., a retired budget examiner for the Office of Management and Budget, where he had worked for 40 years; Feb. 6.

S. Herbert Starkey Jr. Ed’34 GEd’38, Lewisburg, Pa., director of research for the New Jersey Education Association for 21 years, until his retirement in 1973; March 9. He then served as school finance consultant for the State of New Jersey until 1980.

Dr. Roger W. Steinhardt C’34, Rye, N.Y., an internist who maintained a practice in Manhattan for 40 years, until his retirement in 1986; Feb. 22. He then served as a medical adviser for the New York State Department of Health until 2003. During World War II he was a medical captain with the U.S. Army, in Europe.


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1936

Natalie Gibby Brand G’36, Clifton Springs, N.Y., a retired bacteriologist who had worked at the Grasslands, Mt. Cisco, and Clifton Springs hospitals; Feb. 22.

Dr. Earl W. Cook V’36, Huntingdon Valley, Pa., a veterinarian who co-established Quality Control Laboratory; Feb. 21. He had served as class agent and in 2001 received the Veterinary School’s Alumni Award of Merit.

George W. Kohl W’36, Goshen, N.Y., a realtor in Orange County; March 17, 2007. He served in the U.S. Army in the Pacific during World War II and in France during the Korean War; he received the Bronze Star.


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1937

Ruth Saler Blank Ed’37, Elkins Park, Pa., a fundraiser for Alzheimer’s disease for more than 25 years; Jan. 28. She became active in the Alzheimer’s Association in 1976, eventually chairing its executive committee. She initiated its Samuel A. Blank Research Fund (named in honor of her husband, the late Samuel A. Blank W’29 L’32), which supported the work of prominent researchers, including scientists from Penn and Harvard University. She received the Alzheimer Association’s Distinguished Service Award in 1988 and its Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002. One of her sons is Robert S. Blank L’65. His children are Samuel A. Blank C’01, Matthew S. Blank C’03 WG’08 L’08, and Wendy Blank Chaikin C’98, whose husband is Lee D. Chaikin W’95. Ruth’s brother is Dr. Benson Saler Gr’60, whose wife is Joyce Spivak Saler CW’54.

Dr. Camillo T. DeBerardinis C’37 M’41 GM’45, Elkins Park, Pa., March 23.

Dr. Harold E. Stauffer M’37, Lancaster, Pa., a practicing physician for 58 years; Feb. 6. He continued seeing his last patients in nursing homes until age 85.

Walter J. Zwarg C’37, Medford, N.J., senior vice president of Armotek Industries, a gravure and engraving firm, until his retirement in 1981; March 9. At Penn he was captain of the champion crew team. During World War II he served with U.S. Army Intelligence in Germany.


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1938

Myron B. Birnbaum W’38, New Britain, Conn., co-owner of Birnbaum Furniture Co.; Feb. 14. Also a pianist, he was a past president of the Community Concerts of New Britain and wrote program notes for the New Britain Symphony.

Margaret E. Devine Ed’37 GEd’46, Pilgrim Gardens, Pa., a former teacher for the Philadelphia School District; March 5.

Ruth Friedenberg Gilden CW’38 SW’65, Philadelphia, March 5.

Francis J. Ott W’38, Yardville, N.J., a plant policeman for General Motors for 28 years, until his retirement in 1977; March 15. He had served in the U.S. Army during World War II.

Dr. William J. Sclafani D’38, Blue Bell, Pa., a dentist who had maintained a practice for 45 years; Jan. 18. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Dental Corps.

Meyer Straus C’38, Coronado, Calif., a high-school mathematics teacher for the Philadelphia School District; Dec. 17.

Dr. Joseph Wallace Jr. C’38 GM’45, York, Pa., an ear, nose, and throat specialist who had maintained a practice in Lansdowne from 1945 until his retirement in 1991; Feb. 1. He served on the staff of Delaware County Memorial Hospital and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and taught head and neck anatomy for several years at Penn’s Graduate School of Medicine.


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1939

Wanda Rice Bradley NTS’39, Leawood, Ky., Feb. 25.

Dr. Adolph A. Friedman C’39, Bethesda, Md., an endocrinologist who specialized in thyroid problems and diabetes, until his retirement in 2000, at age 83; Nov. 4. In later years he also administered hormone therapy for transsexual people who were considering sex-reassignment surgery. During World War II he served as a U.S. military physician in Europe.

George B. McClelland C’39 L’46, Seminole, Fla., an attorney who practiced trust law in Princeton, N.J., until retiring in 1982; Feb. 16. Known as “Bry,” he served in the U.S. Army Air Force, Eighth Air Force, 96th Bomb Group, during World War II. His daughter is Jean Krause CW’69, whose children are Karen Krause W’97 and Jonathan Krause W’01.

John L. McDonnell WEv’39, Millville, N.J., the retired manager of public affairs at Atlantic City Electric, where he had worked for more than 52 years; Feb. 5. He had started there as a meter reader. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy.


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1940

Sidney R. Altman W’40, Tampa, Fla., October. He was a veteran of World War II.

Dr. Marie E. Costello CW’40 G’43 SW’51 GrS’64, Philadelphia, a senior research associate for the United Way Health and Welfare, until her retirement in 1976; Feb. 10.

Harry J. Crosson Jr. W’40, Atlantic Beach, Fla., director of industrial relations for Otis Elevator, until his retirement in 1980; Jan. 19. During World War II he served with the U.S. Air Force in the Pacific Theater.

William R. Hegemann WEv’40, Havertown, Pa., the retired manager of student financial services at the University, where he worked from 1964 to 1980; Sept. 16. His sons are Dr. David A. Hegemann C’76 GCE’77 GRP’79 Gr’81, whose wife is Margaret Kirsch Hegemann C’77 GEd’79, and Bruce E. Hegemann C’79.

James R. Herbig W’40, Hilton Head Island, S.C., former corporate budget director for worldwide operations at United Fruit Co. in Boston; Jan. 23.

Rhoda Yentis Himowitz Ed’40, Mount Laurel, N.J., Nov. 14.

Joseph Arthur Jansen W’40, Walnut Creek, Calif., Jan. 16, 2007. He worked for Kaiser Aluminum in Oakland from 1954 until his retirement in 1984. During World War II he served with the U.S. Air Force 21st Statistical Control Unit in Europe.

Margaret Phillips Naye Ed’40, Chadds Ford, Pa., Feb. 13.

Dr. Edith Torgan Penneys CW’40 M’43 GM’47, Merion, Pa., a psychiatrist who had maintained a practice until 2005; March 10.

Frank N. Piasecki ME’40, Essington, Pa., an aviation pioneer who invented the tandem-rotor helicopters used by the U.S. Army and Navy; Feb. 11. Also a violinist, he was concertmaster of the orchestra while at Penn. In 1943 he launched the PV-2, a small single-seat helicopter with a three-blade rotor, making him the second American to build and fly a helicopter. The company he started, with several friends from Penn, PV Engineering Forum, led in 1945 to his inventing the tandem-rotor XHRP-X transport helicopter, which became known as “the Flying Banana.” In 1946 the company’s name changed to Piasecki Helicopter Corp., which later became the Rotocraft Division of Boeing Co. In 1955 he formed the Piasecki Aircraft Corp. in Philadelphia, of which he remained chief executive officer. The helicopters he developed, including the U.S. Army’s Chinook and the U.S. Navy’s Sea Knight, are still in use. At the time of his death he was actively inventing and refining helicopter accoutrements, including a ducted fan to replace the vertical tail rotor. His daughter is Nicole W. Piasecki WG’89. His wife, Vivian Weyerhaeuser Piasecki, is an overseer of the School of Nursing and a former University trustee.

Hon. Joseph D. Roulhac G’40 L’48, Akron, Ohio, the first African- American judge appointed to the Akron Municipal Court; March 5. He began practicing law in the city in 1949, and in 1957 became the first African-American prosecutor in Summit County. He was sworn in as municipal judge in 1967 and retired in 1987. Long associated with Stillman College, he served on its board, 1968-86; in 2003 a residence hall was named in his honor.

Dominic J. Vander Neut WEv’40, Kunkletown, Pa., regional vehicle manager for the Philadelphia region of the U.S. Postal Service; Feb. 22. He retired in 1971, with 36 years of service. He was also an inspector of contracts with the Philadelphia Housing Authority for nine years. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in the Pacific.


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1941

Jerrold M. Adler W’41, Jenkintown, Pa., March 5. His brother-in-law is Dr. Leonard L. Malamut C’39 M’43.

Dr. Richard D. Altick Gr’41, Worthington, Ohio, Regents Professor of English emeritus at Ohio State University, where he taught from 1945 until his retirement in 1982; Feb. 7. A scholar of Victorian studies, he wrote The Scholar Adventurers (1950), The Art of Literary Research (1963), and A Preface to Critical Reading (1949 and 1969). His early masterpiece, The English Common Reader: A Social History of the Mass Reading Public 1800-1900, was celebrated last year by scholars at the University of Oxford on the 50th anniversary of its publication. Following retirement, he wrote Paintings from Books: Art and Literature in Britain, 1760-1900 (1985). He was a frequent contributor of essay-reviews for the Times Literary Supplement and the London Review of Books. He was assisted in his scholarly work by his wife, Helen Keller Altick G’45, who died in 2007.

Dr. William Eisenberg D’41, Carlsbad, Calif., a dentist in Hartford, Conn., from 1946 to 1960, and then in Southern California, until his retirement in 1975; Jan. 11. He was affiliated with the University’s Harrison Society. In World War II he was a major in the U.S. Army in the Pacific Theater and served as chief of dental services at the 108th Station Hospital.

Jane Mark Jackson G’41, Middletown, Pa., a retired teacher of English at Penncrest High School; 2008.

G. Irving Latz W’41, Fort Wayne, Ind., president of Sci-Agra for 14 years and Wolf & Dessauer for 25 years, until his retirement in 1966; Feb. 20. During World War II he served as a captain in the U.S. Army.

Judith Rubinstein Rosenberg CW’41, New York, a founder and past president of the Women’s Division of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and a supporter of numerous medical and educational institutions; Jan. 23. At Penn she was a member of Sigma Delta Tau sorority. In 1999 she set up a scholarship for students at the University.

Arthur F. Rudy G’41, Landisville, Pa., the retired manager of production and control in the advertising department of Armstrong World Industries, where he had worked for 38 years; Sept. 14.

Roger J. Soens W’41, Avalon, N.J., an attorney in Philadelphia for 20 years before embarking on a real estate career; March 15. At Penn he was a member of the crew team. He left law in 1967 to become a broker for Avalon Real Estate. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy in Washington.

S. Robert Teitelman L’41, Haverford, Pa., a partner in his family’s law firm in Camden and then Collingswood, N.J., until his retirement in 2007; Feb. 11. He compiled Birch’s Views of Philadelphia, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1983). During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy aboard destroyer tenders in the South Pacific.


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1942

Ralph J. Johnston L’42, Wyoming, Pa., a retired attorney; March 6. He had practiced in firms in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., before entering into partnership with his son; March 6.

William B. Ogden III W’42, Naples, Fla., the retired senior vice president and manager of the fiduciary division of Merchant National Bank in Syracuse, N.Y., where he had worked for 36 years; March 5. He founded the Trust New Business School at New York University. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army stateside, retiring as a major.

William G. Owen W’42 GEd’67, Newtown Square, Pa., retired executive assistant to former President Sheldon Hackney; Jan. 23. He returned to Penn in 1953 as assistant secretary of the University. Six years later he became assistant vice president in the President’s Office and then Dean of Admissions. He served as secretary of the University, 1968-75. With the launching of the major campaign Program for the Eighties, he was named vice president for development under senior vice president E. Craig Sweeten W’37. His accomplishments at Penn included the development of the central academic calendar, the Alumni Council on Admissions, and the Small Communities Talent Search, in which the Admissions Office worked with high school students in rural areas of Pennsylvania to recruit promising students. After retiring in 1986, he continued working at the University as a consultant and was involved with the Kelly Writers House. He was a member of the executive board that funded the complete renovation of the Class of 1942 Garden at Kelly Writers House. He also served on the board for Almanac and the Faculty Club (now University Club at Penn) and was a consultant for Penn’s 250th anniversary celebration in 1990. He received the Alumni Award of Merit in 1992. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps, stateside; he returned to the Army, serving in Korea, during the Korean War. One of his daughters is Sandra Owen Richards C’78 GEd’78, whose husband is Thomas W. Richards GEd’78. Two of their sons are Thomas W. Richards C’04 GEd’06 and William O. Richards C’10.

Raymond L. Watrous Jr. ME’42, Audubon, Pa., a retired mechanical engineer; Jan. 24. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Corps in the South Pacific.


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1943

Stanley Berman W’43, New York, an attorney who was of counsel to the firm Bryan Cave LLP and name partner of its predecessor firm, Robinson, Silverman, Pearce, Aronsohn & Berman; Feb. 20. Formerly chief counsel and associate deputy commissioner of the Federal Housing Administration, he remained devoted to the cause of affordable housing throughout his life.

Barbara Gilman Cannell CW’43, Naples, Maine, a social worker for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, until her retirement in 1978; Aug. 28, 2007. At Penn she made nationals in both field hockey and lacrosse and qualified for the U.S. Olympic Team to play in Berlin in 1939.

Paul G. Douglas W’43, Yarmouth Port, Mass., a former trustee and investment banker with the Hyde Park Savings Bank; March 4. At Penn he was a member of ROTC. He was the first president of the University’s Alumni Association in Boston. His career in investment banking spanned four decades. During World War II he served in the Pacific with the U.S. Army and later remained in the Army Reserves for 11 years, retiring with the rank of major.

William H. Landis W’43, West Chester, Pa., the retired owner of Tri-State Distributors in Philadelphia; March 4. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Air Force.

Virginia Morrow Murphy Ed’43, Havertown, Pa., a special-education teacher in the Haverford School District for 19 years; Jan. 10. She retired from Chatham Park Elementary School in 1986. She attended Penn on a scholarship. Her husband is Edgar G. Murphy W’43.


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1944

Augustus S. Ballard Sr. C’44 L’48, Philadelphia, an attorney with the law firm of Pepper Hamilton for 47 years; Feb. 9. He practiced corporate law, serving as chair of the firm, 1972-84, and as co-chair, 1984-86. He retired as an active partner in 1989 and remained as counsel through 1995. His most-noted case was in the late 1940s, when he was co-counsel in the defense of Philadelphia chemist Harry Gold, who passed secrets to convicted spies Ethel and Julius Rosenberg. Although Gold was sentenced to 30 years in prison, Augustus worked vigorously for his release, which occurred in 1966—which he attended. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in the Pacific. His sons are Augustus S. Ballard Jr. C’76 and Wainwright A. Ballard W’86. His Penn family includes his brother, Francis Ballard L’49, whose son is Francis Ballard Jr. G’88 WG’88, and a niece, Ernesta Ballard CW’67. Two of his brothers, Frederic L. Ballard C’39 L’42 and John A. Ballard C’45 L’48, are deceased.

Elizabeth Massey Ballinger CW’44, Needham, Mass., Jan. 22. A pastoral-care counselor who worked with the terminally ill for more than two decades.

Samuel V. Colegrove W’44, Chester, N.J., a controller of the Livingston campus of CIT, until his retirement in 1987; Feb. 1. He had worked for the firm since 1953. During World War II he served with the U.S. Fifth Air Force in the Pacific.

Dr. Robert D. Krudener M’44, Naples, Fla., a physician who had maintained a practice in Ridgeway, N.J., and then in Naples, until his retirement in 1986; March 3. During World War II he served as a captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps.

Dr. Jerome S. Mittelman C’44 D’47, New York, Feb. 12.


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1946

Dr. Seibert L. Berlin V’46, Wyomissing, Pa., a veterinarian who maintained both large and small animal practices throughout his career; Jan. 3.

Betty J. MacEwan Kohlenberger Ed’46 GEd’47, Deland, Fla., a first grade teacher in Upper Township, N.J., until her retirement in 1983; March 5. At Penn she was a member of Kappa Alpha Theta sorority.

Barbara Taylor Ramsey CCC’46 GEd’63, Philadelphia, head of the Special Education Department at Audenried School, where she had taught for 32 years, until retiring in 1981; Feb. 16.

Randolph D. Zelov ME’46, Bryn Mawr, Pa., Feb. 13.


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1947

Stanley E. Gever W’47 L’49, Philadelphia, an attorney who practiced civil and criminal law for more than 50 years, until his retirement in 2006; Feb. 2. He was also an arbitrator for the American Arbitration Association and Philadelphia Common Pleas Court. He was deputy sheriff for the city, 1972-76. During World War II he served in U.S. Naval intelligence, including at Pearl Harbor.

John R. Jones WG’47, Atlanta, a certified public accountant with Arthur Anderson & Co., until his retirement in 1987; Dec. 31. He then served as an associate professor at Emory University Business School and a faculty adviser to Beta Alpha Psi, an accounting fraternity. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II.

Murray L. Schwartz WG’47 L’49, Pacific Palisades, Calif., former dean of the UCLA Law School and the first David G. Price and Dallas P. Price Professor of Law Emeritus; Feb. 15. Joining the law faculty in 1958, he went on to serve as dean, 1969-75, before retiring in 1991. He was the recipient of a Distinguished Alumnus Award from Penn’s Law School. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy, as a commanding officer of a submarine chaser.


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1948

Rev. Edward W. Battin C’48, Chambersburg, Pa., vicar of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Concordville, 1951-54, and then rector there from 1954 until his retirement in 1992; Jan. 7.

Robert M. Cameron W’48, Hilton Head Island, S.C., a retired vice president of Rouse Co.; Oct. 28, 2005. Despite losing his eyesight due to detached retinas in the early 1970s, he continued as an executive with Rouse until his retirement in 1990. During World War II he served  in the U.S. Army Air Force.

Edward E. Marshall Jr. C’48, Blue Bell, Pa., Jan. 21. At Penn he played football under George Munger all four years. Following graduation he was drafted by the Washington Redskins and San Francisco 49ers; a horseback-riding accident ended his chance at a professional career. He was the owner of Huntingdon Industries, 1950-81, and then Seamco, a manufacturer of sports balls in Hatfield. He had served in the civil engineering corps of the U.S. Naval Reserve for 10 years.

Gerald C. Mauro W’48, Southborough, Mass., founder and president of Cytology Screening, Inc., from 1959 until his retirement in 2002; Feb. 6. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in the Pacific, for which he received decorations including the Bronze Star and the  Philippines Liberation Ribbon.

Dr. Lawrence J. Pearson D’48, Stamford, Conn., a longtime dentist who founded and edited the periodical Continued Dental Education; Dec. 21. He served in the U.S. Navy before and after World War II.

Dr. Walter R. Voight GEd’48, Ridgefield, Conn., a retired principal in the Ridgefield public school system; Feb. 23. He had served in the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant, junior grade.


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1949

Ralph B. D’Iorio L’49, West Chester, Pa., March 2.

Dr. Charles A. Doehlert Jr. M’49, Sarasota, Fla., a physician who practiced internal medicine with Associated Physicians in Madison, Wis., for 36 years, until his retirement in 1991; April 13, 2007. He served as a physician with the U.S. Navy aboard the aircraft carrier Franklin Delano Roosevelt during the Korean War.

Dr. David M. Friedland G’49, Albany, N.Y., a psychologist who practiced in Massachusetts and Albany until retiring in 1997; Jan. 8. He was also an assistant professor of psychology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army.

Dr. Ernest F. Johnson Gr’49, Freeport, Maine, emeritus professor of chemical engineering at Princeton University, where he had taught from 1948 to 1986; Feb. 2. His research included process dynamics and control, thermodynamic and kinetic properties of fluids, and hazardous wastes management. The author of over eighty publications, he was closely associated with the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

Marion Kerr Vitale Ed’49, Newton, N.J., director of the Division of Public Health Nursing in Sussex County, until her retirement in 1988; Dec. 19. She established the division (first known as the Department of Social and Health Services) in 1962; it became the first home health agency in the county to be approved by Medicare.


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1950

William O. Walther WEv’50, Glenside, Pa., Feb. 3.

Dr. Russell W. Willey G’50, Wilmington, Del., Jan. 11. He worked for Beneficial Corp. in Wilmington for 25 years, retiring in 1981 as vice president and comptroller. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army, attaining the rank of captain.


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1951

Dr. Craig Baxter W’51 G’54 Gr’67, Huntingdon, Pa., a Foreign Service officer, 1956-1981, and professor of history and politics at Juniata College, 1981-99; Feb. 7. The author of a number of books on South Asia, he served as president of both the American Institute of Bangladesh Studies and the American Institute of Pakistan Studies. His wife, Barbara Stevens Baxter CW’55, died in 2003. (See “Obituaries,” Sept./Oct. 2004.)

John M. Bickelhaupt W’51, Saratoga Springs, N.Y., an insurance agent for his family’s firm, Van Voast & Leonard, where he worked for more than 40 years; Feb. 23. At Penn he was president of the senior class and a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He had been a pilot in the U.S. Army Air Corps, stationed in the Pacific.

Robert I. Goldman L’51, Cape Elizabeth, Maine, an attorney for the Maine State Labor Relations Board for 10 years, until his retirement in the 1980s; July 30, 2007. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army.

R. John McHugh C’51, Philadelphia, Feb. 3.

Regina Haig Meredith L’51, Pennington, N.J., a founding partner in the law firm of Meredith, Meredith, Chase & Taggert, where she specialized in family, matrimonial, and estate law for 50 years; Jan. 18. Also active in regional politics, she was elected one of the first female freeholders in Mercer County, New Jersey, and was vice chair of the New Jersey State Republican Committee for a number of years. Her husband is Edward B. Meredith L’51.

Henry B. Robb III C’51, Paoli, Pa., March 1. At Penn he was a member of Delta Psi (St. Anthony Hall) fraternity. As a member of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, 28th Infantry Division of the U.S. Army, he served active duty in Germany during the Korean War, when the Pennsylvania National Guard was federalized.

Joseph E. Rushin GEd’51, Port Saint Lucie, Fla., principal of Southwestern Central High School in New York, until his retirement in 1982; Feb. 27. His 36-year career in education included coaching the track team there.

Dr. James F. Wright V’51, Raleigh, N.C., a veterinarian and veterinary researcher; Jan. 10. An adjunct professor at the North Carolina School of Veterinary Medicine, he studied the effect of radiation on mammals and helped develop and refine the tranquilizer gun. During World War II he served in the Pacific with the 7th and 20th divisions of the U.S. Army Air Corps.


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1952

Richard P. Dunsmore W’52, Vero Beach, Fla., Nov. 13.

Inez Green Lundy CW’52 G’55, Philadelphia, one of the first female judges for the commonwealth of Pennsylvania’s Workman’s Compensation Department, which she served from 1987 until retiring in 2000; Feb. 24. Earlier she had been assistant district attorney, assistant attorney general, and deputy attorney general.

Kermit B. Robinson W’52, Radnor, Pa., owner of Fugazy Travel Agency in Wayne, which he operated from 1973 until his retirement in 2007; Jan. 22. A U.S. Army captain during World War II, he served as a cryptographer in India and China.

Gordon A. Whiting Jr. WEv’52, West Chester, Pa., cash accounting manager for Penn Central Corp., until his retirement in 1980; March 11. During the 1930s he served in the U.S. Navy aboard the U.S.S. Savannah. He served in the Pacific with the U.S. Army during World War II, and was part of the occupying forces in Japan.

Robert H. Yaroschuk W’52 L’58, Doylestown, Pa., an attorney who had maintained a law practice since 1958; Feb. 24. At Penn he was a member of the swim team. He also sold art and antiques through his shops in Lambertville and Frenchtown, N.J., until 2004. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army infantry.


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1953

Walter L. Bartholomew Jr. L’53, Newtown Square, Pa., former chair of the Real Estate Department of the Philadelphia law firm Montgomery, McCracken, Walker & Rhoads, where he had worked from 1950 until his retirement in 1994; Feb. 24. A founding member of the real-estate committee of the Philadelphia Bar Association, he was a legal adviser to the board of LaSalle College, which awarded him an honorary degree. During World War II he was a radar operator with the U.S. Navy, serving aboard the three-masted schooner U.S.S. Guinevere.

Robert C. Byerly CE’53, Murrells Inlet, S.C., an employee of Mobil Oil for 31 years; Jan. 18. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army.

Marie T. Cooney Campbell Nu’53, Springfield, Pa., Feb. 20.

Dr. Jeptha J. Carrell Gr’53, Oberlin, Ohio, executive director of what is now the Nord Family Foundation from 1979 until his retirement in 1989; During World War II he was a rifle platoon leader with the first U.S. Marine Division, and landed in Okinawa during the first wave of the invasion. He served again during the Korean War, retiring with the rank of captain.

Harold E. Markowitz W’53, Bellmore, N.Y., an attorney and CPA with the accounting firm of Hirsch, Markowitz & Co., later Harold E. Markowitz & Co.; Oct. 20, 2005. At Penn he was a member of the fencing team and Phi Sigma Delta fraternity. He had served as an officer in the U.S. Navy for three years.

David G. Shirlaw Jr. W’53, Lexington, Ky., a retired casualty and property insurance underwriter for the McDonough, Caperton, Shepherd & Goldsmith Insurance firm; March 11. At Penn he was a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. In 1992 he founded Risk Management Consulting. During the Korean War he served in the U.S. Army.

Dr. Coleman R. Tuckson GD’53, Washington, retired associate dean for advanced education, research, and special projects, and emeritus professor of dentistry at Howard University; Jan. 24. He joined Howard’s faculty in 1948. In 1962 he established the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology and served as its chair before retiring in 1986. He served in the U.S. Air Force Reserve for 23 years, obtaining the rank of lieutenant colonel.


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1954

Dr. Perry I. Barr C’54, Voorhees, N.J., a physician who maintained a practice for 48 years; Feb. 15.

Richard C.D. Biddle C’54, Delray Beach, Fla., Feb. 9.

Roy Fuiman W’54, Penn Valley, Pa., a real estate developer and head of Fuiman Real Estate Co., until his retirement in 2006; Jan. 26. The family firm oversaw renovation of houses in Society Hill and Washington Square, where they developed Jefferson Village behind Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He had served in the U.S. Navy.

Dr. William J. Sohn GM’54, Willow Grove, Pa., a pediatrician who retired in December; March 1. The solo practice he originated in the 1950s later included other physicians and became North Willow Grove Pediatrics. A staff member of Abington Memorial Hospital for 52 years, he received an award for his dedication to teaching residents there. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army in Germany.


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1955

Richard M. Armstrong EE’55, Annapolis, Md., a capacity planner for IBM for 34 years, until his retirement; Jan. 8.

William H. Doerflinger WEv’55, Hilton Head Island, S.C., general manager of the DuPont Company’s The Playhouse Theatre in Wilmington, Del., from 1952 until his retirement in 1986; Feb. 26. He had worked for DuPont for 44 years. As a member of the U.S. Army’s 115th Antiaircraft Gun Division during World War II, he participated in the Allied liberation of Europe in June 1944.

Elizabeth Donkle Eben Ed’55, Naperville, Ill., March 7.

B. Gary Scott W’55, Wilmington, Del., president and CEO of B. Gary Scott Realtors from its founding in 1962 until its sale to Prudential in 1991; Feb. 17. At Penn he played varsity football for four years and lacrosse for one year. He received the Maxwell Club Award for Major College Player for Penn’s 13-7 victory against Penn State. He was a member of the Sphinx Senior Honor Society, the Scabbard and Blade Honor Society, and ROTC. A lieutenant in the U.S. Army Reserve, he served active duty for eight years, retiring as an infantry captain.


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1956

Dr. Ray J. Wu Gr’56, Ithaca, N.Y., a Liberty Hyde Bailey Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at Cornell University, and a pioneer of genetic engineering; Feb. 10. Prior to joining the Cornell faculty in 1966, he had done research work at Stanford University and Penn. In 1970 he developed the first method for sequencing DNA and some of the fundamental tools for DNA cloning. He was also instrumental in the development of a higher-yield rice that resists disease and drought. In 1999 he established the Ray Wu Graduate Fellowship in Molecular Biology and Genetics at Cornell, which he personally funded for five years.


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1957

Barbara Tinkleman Weiss Ed’57, Newtown, Pa., Jan. 29.


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1958

Peter M. de Manio C’58, Sarasota, Fla., a trial lawyer and mediator who taught trial advocacy and served for five years as a circuit judge in Orange County; March 20. At Penn he was a member of the varsity lacrosse, varsity heavyweight crew, and varsity swimming teams, as well as Phi Gamma Delta fraternity. He performed in Mask & Wig and the Penn Players. Later he interviewed for the local Penn secondary-schools committee. For 18 years beginning in 1990 he coached and mentored hundreds of young rowers and founded two rowing programs in Sarasota. During World War II he served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

Dr. Edwin T. Greninger Gr’58, Johnson City, Tenn., emeritus professor of history at East Tennessee State University, where he taught from 1958 until his retirement in 1986; Dec. 21. At Penn he was a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity. He was the author of Fifteen Days in Russia (1966). During World War II he served in the U.S. Army, becoming historian for the 358th Anti-Aircraft Battalion.


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1959

William H. Eastburn L’59, Doylestown, Pa., an attorney with the firm of Eastburn & Gray, who specialized in land-use and real-estate law; March 7. A devoted humanitarian, he worked diligently to improve the lives of at-risk adolescents, Native Americans, and victims of the Katrina disaster. After being shot in the chest by a mentally ill former client in 1993, he founded the Voice of Reason, an organization committed to reducing violence without infringing on personal liberties. His wife is Constance Allen Eastburn CW’59.

Robert E. Flower W’59, Harrison, N.Y., president and CEO of Bliss Manufacturing Corp. and Nan Flower Lingerie of New York and Peekskill; March 11. He was also a city councilman in Peekskill for eight years. He had been a captain in the U.S. Army.

Dr. Daniel W. Horner Jr. C’59, Dresher, Pa., March 2.

William T. Marsh L’59, Bonita Springs, Fla., the first vice president and general counsel of Sprang & Company of Butler, Pa., a position he held for 30 years, until retiring in 1998; April 1, 2007. He had served in the U.S. Coast Guard.


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1960

Martin R. Fine C’60, New York, a real estate investor who was one of the first to invest in the NoHo neighborhood of Manhattan; March 14. Also a philanthropist, he created the Fine Greenwald Foundation. He served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps and the Judge Advocate General Corps, 1963-65.


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1961

Marguerite F. Biddle FA’61, Mesilla, N.M., Jan. 21. She worked in communications for Rohm and Haas and McDonnell Douglas.

Dr. Robert M. Figlio C’61 Gr’71, Upper Pittsgrove, N.J., former associate professor of legal studies and criminology at the University; March 15. He was also an associate director of the former Sellin Center for Studies in Criminology and Criminal Law (now the Jerry Lee Center of Criminology). He later taught at the University of California, Riverside. His research with the late Dr. Thorsten Sellin  G’16 Gr’22 Hon’68 and the late Dr. Marvin E. Wolfgang G’50 Gr’55 led to several landmark criminology studies, including Delinquency in a Birth Cohort (1972). (See “Obituaries,” Sept |Oct 1998, www.upenn.edu/gazette/0904/0904obits.html.) He was co-author (with Wolfgang and Terence P. Thornberry) of Evaluating Criminology (1978) and From Boy to Man, from Delinquency to Crime (1987). And he co-edited Metropolitan Crime Patterns (1986). He was a founder, in 1988, of CAP Index, Inc., a firm that did pioneering work in crime-risk information and vulnerability analysis. A memorial fund in his name has been established at the University. His daughter is Sarah H. Figlio C’87.

Evelyn Page Parker Nu’61, Pittsburgh, a professor of nursing at the the University of Pittsburgh from 1969 until 1981, and then at Duquesne University, until her retirement three years later; Jan. 2. She remained an active advocate for African-American students.


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1962

Richard R. Block L’62, Philadelphia, a partner in the law firm of Meltzer & Schiffrin and then Beitch & Block, and an assistant district attorney; March 17. A specialist in family law, he was named director of community relations for the District Attorney’s Office in 1990. He was a member of the Workers’ Compensation Appeal Board and the Pennsylvania Commission on Child Support.

Thomas J. Furia GEE’62, North Wales, Pa., Feb. 6.

Saul L. Himmelfarb C’62, Canton, Conn., a computer programmer and systems analyst at Aetna and then at Travelers insurance firms; March 2. He graduated from Penn magna cum laude. During the Vietnam War he was a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army, serving in Europe.

Dr. Michael Radovic V’62, McDonald, Pa., a veterinarian who had maintained a practice for 45 years; March 12.


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1965

Gerald J. McConomy L’65, Wynnewood, Pa., a partner with Knapp, McConomy, Merlie in Chester Springs, which he had joined in 2000; Feb. 28. Previously he had been a partner with Wolf, Block, Schorr & Solis-Cohen in Philadelphia and with Fox, Rothschild, O’Brien & Frankel in Exton. At Penn he was a member of the law review. He had served in the U.S. Marine Corps as an atomic, biological, and chemical warfare officer at Camp Pendleton, Calif., and remained loyal to the Marines throughout his life.

C. David Robinson GAr’65, Sausalito, Calif., an architect who co-founded Robinson, Mills and Williams in 1970 and founded C. David Robinson Architects in 1997; Feb. 2. His many projects include the Charles Shultz Museum, San Francisco Cliff House, San Jose Museum of Art, and Cantor Museum at Stanford University. He was a commissioned officer in the U.S. Marine Corps, 1958-61.


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1966

Margaret J. DeLaCour CW’66, Brooklyn, N.Y., Feb. 18. Throughout a long career she served in a number of senior-level positions in New York City government, including at the Department of Environmental Protection, the NYC Water Board, and the Brooklyn Borough President’s Office.

Robert D. McGuckin Sr. WG’66, Collegeville, Pa., the retired co-owner, with his wife, Catherine, of The Candle Shop in Chestnut Hill; April 11, 2007. He had served as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army.

Bobbie J. Williams SW’66, Philadelphia, retired director of social services at the former Booth Maternity Hospital and former senior counselor at Temple University Medical School; Sept. 13. Also a therapist at the Belmont Center for Comprehensive Treatment, she was the first woman and first African American to hold that position.


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1967

Lawrence R. Gustin WEv’67, Tampa, Fla., Jan. 30.

Albert Konrad Jr. WEv’67, Rydal, Pa., Feb. 15.

William P. Lyons WG’67, Vero Beach, Fla., a professor of entrepreneurship and corporate finance at the Yale University School of Management for 17 years; Feb. 11. He also taught business ethics at Yale Law School. In 1987 he bought the Duro Test Corporation in Fairfield, N.J., serving as chair and CEO; he went on to acquire Morton Grove Pharmaceuticals in Pittsburgh. He had served in the U.S. Army.


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1968

Eric C. van Merkensteijn C’68 WG’71 GEd’74, Philadelphia, lecturer for the Center for Organizational Dynamics at the Wharton School; Feb. 14. In 1968 he joined the staff of Penn’s English Language Laboratory, eventually serving as its director. He joined Wharton in 1975, where he was associate dean of finance and administration and later adjunct professor of public policy and management. In 1985 he began teaching at the Center for Organizational Dynamics. He was co-author of the book To Improve Office Design…Turn it Upside Down. Also a consultant on entrepreneurship, he established Van M’s Music Bar & Grille in Old City Philadelphia in the 1990s. His Penn family includes his wife, Sallie L. Griffin Van Merkesteijn CGS’72 G’78, his son James E. Van Merkensteijn C’92, and his brother, John H. Van Merkensteijn III L’68. Eric’s father-in-law is Gordon D. Griffin L’48 and his brother-in-law is Henry R. F. Griffin C’73 L’78.

Charles E. Zimmerman WG’68, Cleveland, a marketing consultant who also taught at the University of Akron; Feb. 27. His twin brother was the late Donald A. Zimmerman WG’68, listed below.

Donald A. Zimmerman WG’68, Akron, Ohio, a professor at Akron University for 25 years; April 13, 2007. He received Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award in 1994 at Community and Technical College. His twin brother was the late Charles E. Zimmerman WG’68, listed above.

1969

Dr. James J. Boswell V’69, Plymouth, Mass., a veterinarian who in 1975 founded Pilgrim Animal Hospital, which is now in its 33rd year of operation; Jan. 11.


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1970

William P. Loesche WG’70, Bryn Mawr, Pa., Jan. 19. Known as “Pete,” he had been corporate counsel and assistant corporate secretary at Independence Blue Cross in Philadelphia since 2001.

Dr. Thomas Moshang Jr. GM’70, Blue Bell, Pa., emeritus professor of pediatrics and senior physician in the division of endocrinology at the Children’s Hospital of the Philadelphia; Feb. 24. After serving on the staff of Hahnemann Medical College, he in 1982 was appointed adjunct associate professor of pathology and laboratory medicine in Penn’s School of Medicine. In 1983 he became the founding director of the Diagnostic and Research Growth Center at CHOP and also served as chief of the hospital’s endocrinology division, 1995 to 2000. His world-renowned research focused on the endocrine function of children who survive cancer, with a special interest in disordered growth and sexual development related to pediatric cancer and/or the therapies for treating cancer. During the 1980s he was involved in research trials of human growth hormones. Widely published, he was editor of the textbook Pediatric Endocrinology: The Requisites in Pediatrics. Dr. Moshang was to begin a term as president of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society this spring. In recognition of his work, CHOP endowed a chair of pediatric endocrinology in his name in February. Dr. Moshang had also been named one of “The Best Doctors in America,” published by Woodward/White Inc. He had served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps in Alaska. His daughters are Elizabeth J. Moshang Laird C’89 and Alexis A. Moshang C’11.


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1972

Matthew W. Hinkle C’72, Northampton, Pa., a Spanish teacher for the Bethlehem Area School District for the past three years; Jan. 19. Earlier he was a product marketing manager for Agere System Inc., in Allentown for 21 years.

Sondra Cabot Seidman CGS’72 G’75, Wynnewood, Pa., Feb. 4. She was a past president of Planned Parenthood of Sarasota, Fla., one of many community-service positions she held.

David F. Sexton L’72, Greenwich, Conn., the global alliance representative for North America of IBS Securities Co., Ltd., a Tokyo-based investment bank; Sept. 26. He was concurrently senior adviser to Milbank Roy & Co. in New York. An ensign on active duty in the U.S. Naval Reserve, 1966-69, he rose to the rank of lieutenant.


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1973

Randolph Jones GAr’73 GCP’73 GFA’73, Dedham, Mass., a principal of the Jones Payne Group of Boston; Feb. 21. He had served on the AIA Regional Urban Design Committee. During the Vietnam War he was a U.S. Navy officer in the Civil Engineer Corps.

Chana Taub Magun GEd’73, Oaklyn, N.J., a retired Hebrew teacher at Temple Beth Sholom; Jan. 24.


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1974

Dr. Larry S. Eisner M’74, Boca Raton, Fla., a physician who specialized in treatment of neurological disease in South Florida for more than two decades; March 4. He was also a founding director of the Baumel-Eisner Neuromedical Institute. One of his sons is Adam J. Eisner C’98, whose wife is Amy Eisner W’98.


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1975

William A. Hope GAr’75, Philadelphia, an architect who had worked for several award-winning firms; Dec. 7. At Penn he received a Dale Fellowship.

David Nicoll Asc’75, Washington, longtime associate general counsel for the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, which he joined in 1984; Oct. 25, 2006.

 1976

Anilkumar J. Hoffberg C’76, Butler, Md., a partner since 1992 at the law firm of Abramoff, Neuberger and Linder in Baltimore; Dec. 28. Known as “Neil,” he also advised the University of Maryland on finance issues and served as treasurer of the Legal Aid Bureau, providing pro bono legal advice for low-income citizens. His wife is Beverly Trudell Hoffberg W’77.

Dr. Christina M. Lemieux Gr’76, Kutztown, Pa., a professor of anthropology at Kutztown University for 34 years, until her retirement in 2005; Nov. 19. She developed the university’s courses in the area of death, dying, and bereavement. She wrote Coping With the Loss of a Pet.


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 1977

James B. Delehanty W’77, Oceanport, N.J., an acquisition analyst at GMAC in Parsippany for 25 years; Jan. 21. At Penn he played varsity football and was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity and the Friars Senior Honor Society. His father is James B. Delehanty Jr. C’52 and his uncle is Michael L. Delehanty W’52.


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 1979

Elizabeth S. Cummin CGS’79, Kennett Square, March 3.


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1980

Martin T. Kinsey GEd’80, Haddonfield, N.J., Feb. 1. He formerly taught English as a second language at Camden County Community College and the Community College of Philadelphia.

Eleanor M. Duncan Lide C’80, Rockville, Md., November. At Penn “Nellie” was a member of the women’s basketball and volleyball teams and the women’s comedy troupe, Late Bloomers. Her husband is David A. Lide C’81.


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1982

Peter B. Deakins W’82, Berwyn, Pa., an actuary and principal with the Philadelphia office of Milliman Inc., where he worked for 28 years; March 25.

David W. Pope C’82 G’83, Middlebury, Conn., a media specialist at Pomperaug High School for 23 years; Feb. 14.

1994

Dr. Lana Schwebel G’94 Gr’01, Kew Gardens, N.Y., assistant professor of English at Stern College of Yeshiva University, where she had taught since 2006; July 7, 2007. She was assistant professor of religion and literature at the Institute of Sacred Music and Yale Divinity School, 2002-06.


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2001

Brian C. West GCP’01, Jersey City, N.J., senior property manager for the Freedom Tower, part of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey; March 4. At Penn he received the Walt D’Alessio Award as the top student in his Real Estate Finance class. He founded and chaired the first student organization devoted to real estate interests and education at the Graduate School of Fine Arts.


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2002

Angela Nicole Levy WG’02, Chicago, Nov. 26.


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2003

Dr. Joel D. Portnoy M’03 GM’04 WG’07, Wynnewood, Pa., a pediatrician who practiced in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for eight years; March 3. He then joined McKinsey & Company, where he specialized in health care-related business. He was active in the Wharton recruiting committee.


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2005

Karen Sue Carroll SW’05, State College, Pa., a social worker with the Bucks County Housing Group; Feb. 20.


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2007

Rosalind Brachfeld  CGS’07, Philadelphia, March 4.


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Faculty and Staff

Joseph W. Burk W’34 Hon’88, See Class of 1934.

Dr. Belmont G. Farley, Philadelphia, former faculty member in the School of Medicine; Feb. 28. Part of the Penn faculty from 1964 to 1969, he was a teacher and researcher on the electrophysiology of seizures and neural networks. He then was a faculty member at Temple University, retiring in 1986.

Dr. Robert M. Figlio. See Class of 1961.

Dr. Alfred A. Gellhorn Hon’93, New York, former dean of the School of Medicine and former professor of medicine and pharmacology; March 24. Joining Penn as the first director of its Medical Center, he served as dean of the School of Medicine, 1968-73. He introduced new dimensions of social thinking into many aspects of curriculum and health care delivery, including the establishment of the Department of Community Medicine. His collaboration with the local community led to the creation of such programs as the West Philadelphia Community Mental Health Consortium, the Health Education Program, and Gateway to Higher Education, which encouraged minorities to pursue medical degrees. Prior to Penn he held a 25-year tenure at Columbia University and was founding director of the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education of the City College of New York, among other positions. One of his grandchildren is Dr. Alfred Gellhorn Campbell C’97 M’05.

Edwin T. Haefele, Alliance, Neb., emeritus professor of political science; March 16. Prior to coming to Penn, he was a senior scholar and research director at The Brookings Institution and at Resources for the Future. Appointed professor of political science at the University in 1974, he initiated a dual BA/MA program for undergraduates in public policy to encourage those seeking an academic career in the field. After retiring in 1983 he returned to Penn in 1985 as chair of the political science department, in order to recruit new faculty in political theory and political institutions, before ultimately retiring in 1988. His publications include “A Utility Theory of Representative Government” (American Economic Review, 1971) and a book, Representative Government and Environmental Management (1973). During World War II he served in the U.S. Army and was awarded a Purple Heart and a Presidential Unit Citation.

William R. Hegemann. See Class of 1940.

Dr. Morris Mendelson, Swarthmore, Pa., emeritus professor of finance at the Wharton School; March 16. Before coming to Penn in 1961 he had taught at MIT, Harvard, Cornell, and Penn State. Through 50 years of teaching he became internationally recognized in the field of finance, particularly in market structure. In 1975, together with colleagues Junius Peake and R.T. Williams Jr., he proposed replacing the auditory trading system of the NYSE with a fully electronic auction market at Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) hearings. This revolutionary idea was the catalyst that eventually led to a complete restructuring of the NYSE. In addition to his teaching duties, Dr. Mendelson was active in campus governance. He served many years on the Faculty Senate’s Committee on the Faculty, was president of the board of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), and also served on the board of the Faculty Club (now the University Club at Penn). He retired in 1994 but continued to teach. He served as a consultant to the SEC and the Justice Department, as well as the stock exchanges in Japan, Canada, France (Paris Bourse), Lithuania, Russia, and Switzerland. He was an arbitrator for the National Futures Association and president of the International Global Interdependence Center in 1996. His son is Bruce Mendelson C’80.

Dr. Thomas Moshang Jr. See Class of 1970.

William G. Owen. See Class of 1942.

Dr. Elizabeth Kirk Rose. See Class of 1926.

Dr. Richard L. Rowan, Wallingford, Pa., emeritus professor of management at the Wharton School; March 1. He joined the Wharton faculty in 1961. For more than 30 years he served as a faculty member in the School’s Department of Industry, now known as the Department of Management. Dr. Rowan was a renowned scholar on labor relations, and in particular on the rights of disadvantaged employees. In the early 1970s he and a colleague, Dr. Herbert R. Northrup, co-directed the School’s Industrial Research Unit (IRU), which was established in 1921 as the world’s first business school research center. Under their leadership the IRU implemented the Multinational Research Advisory Group, completed several important book series, and helped to reinvigorate the IRU as an active, vital organization. In 1988 Dr. Rowan became director of the IRU, which was renamed the Center for Human Resources. In the 1980s and 1990s he chaired Wharton’s Labor Relations Council, now the Council on Employee Relations. He was the author or co-author and editor of numerous articles and books, and frequently spoke to the news media on labor issues. In 1996 he was honored by Penn’s fraternities for outstanding teaching and mentoring; he retired from Wharton in 1997.

Eric C. van Merkensteijn. See Class of 1968.

Dr. Andrew H. Wallace, Crete, Greece, emeritus professor of mathematics and former chair of the mathematics department; Jan. 18. He joined the Penn faculty in 1965 and retired in 1986. His research was mainly in topology, was groundbreaking and remains frequently cited and used.

Dr. Joseph Wallace Jr. See Class of 1938.


Profiles : Events : Notes : Obituaries



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