Sept | Oct 2005

1910

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1925

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Faculty & Staff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1925
Katherine Semple Stibbe Ed’25, State College, Pa., March 1. For many years she operated two summer resorts in California: Lenape Village at Tafton and Northwood Lodge in Monte Rio. Her first husband was James R. Keiser, an accounting professor at Penn, who died in 1938.

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1928
Alexander Katzin C’28 L’31, Bala Cynwyd, Pa., a retired attorney; March 14. He had served as a special deputy attorney general for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania before entering private practice. His daughter is Judith Katzin Golden CW’58, and her daughter is Roberta Golden C’85.


Kirk C. Tuttle W’28, El Paso, Tex., a retired advertising executive in New York; Dec. 6. At Penn he was selected as the outstanding freshman of his class. After his retirement he served as treasurer of St. John’s College in Santa Fe, N.M. Later he was assistant to the president of the School of American Research.

1929
Robert H. Halff W’29, Beverly Hills, Calif., Dec. 18.

Herbert G. Marvin C’29 L’33, Kennett Square, Pa., a retired attorney; Dec. 26.

Dr. Etta M. Pettyjohn Ed’29 G’32 Gr’51, Southampton, Pa., retired principal of Kensington High School for Girls; April 15. She taught biology at Overbrook High School and was vice principal of Frankford High School before serving as principal of Kensington, her alma mater, from 1956 to 1971. Throughout her career she was known for innovative forms of teaching, including alternative education for the disadvantaged, team teaching, bilingual instruction, and programs to increase self-image. After her retirement she joined with the Kensington Community Council and the Fishtown Civic Association to restore Penn Treaty Park, where William Penn is thought to have signed a peace treaty with the Lenni Lenape Indians after arriving in Philadelphia in 1682. The park, on the shore of the Delaware River, had become overgrown and neglected, but is now a green oasis because of her efforts. In 1978 she was awarded the American Educators Medal for her work in saving the park. And she was honored for community service by the American Legion Post in Kensington.

1930
Charles P. Elterich W’30, Ambler, Pa., Dec. 21, 2003.

Dr. Carl E. Krill M’30, Akron, Ohio, a physician for more than 60 years, until his retirement in 1996; Jan. 27. He was a member of the medical staffs of Akron City, Akron General, Akron Children’s, and St. Thomas hospitals, the latter where he served as chief of staff.

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1932
Richard V. Zug L’32, Kennett Square, Pa., a retired attorney; Jan. 14.

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1934
D. F. Giberson W’34, Mountain City, Tenn., Feb. 16.

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1935
Edward C. Boyer ChE’35, Auburn, Ala., Jan. 11, 2004.

Jack Heidelberg W’35, San Diego, Oct. 26, 2004.

Willard W. Heiney C’35, Oxford, Pa., the former owner of the Oxford News Shop and a Sears store; Feb. 14. According to his son George, he was “very proud of the University of Pennsylvania, always read the Gazette with great interest, and enjoyed recounting his days at Penn with his grandchildren.”

Col. Walter Killilae C’35 L’38, Wichita, Kan., a retired U.S. Army colonel; April 23. As an Army officer he served at the Pentagon and in the Pacific during World War II and commanded the 82nd Battalion during the Korean War, earning two Silver Stars and a Purple Heart. He taught for a time at West Point Military Academy and was a post commander at Fort Clayton in Panama. He was active in the Army Air Defense Command and retired as a colonel in 1968. He was then employed by the state of Missouri, in vocational rehabilitation, until retiring in 1978.

Dr. John R. Lutz C’35, Willisburg, Ky., March 13, 2003.

Joseph Mazia C’35, Chevy Chase, Md., Feb. 14.

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1936
E. Margaret Carson SW’36, Philadelphia, March 23.

John T. Conner C’36 L’39, Verona, Pa., a retired attorney; Nov. 6.

Ruth Press Karr CW’36, Haverford, Pa., April.

Horace Hagedorn W’36, Sands Point, N.Y., the founder and promoter of Miracle-Gro plant fertilizer; Jan. 31. He began his career selling advertising time on radio, after which he produced a radio crime-drama series, The Big Story.

Robert A. Lewis C’36, Great Neck, N.Y., March 9.

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1937
Dr. Marco H. Goodman C’37, Orinda, Calif., a family physician who practiced for 37 years, until his retirement in 1982; March 8. Born in Egypt, he was a child of Sephardic Jews who had fled what was then Palestine during the waning days of the Ottoman Empire: His first language was Ladino, the medieval Spanish spoken by Sephardic Jews. As a family practitioner in California, he made house calls, delivered babies, and dispensed advice, “which was invariably calm, pragmatic, and nonjudgmental,” said one of his sons, Richard. An advocate for Jewish causes, he supported numerous organizations, including providing a matching grant to establish a Jewish Federation endowment that enabled students to study in Israel. His wife was Ruth Mazer Goodman Ed’44, who died in 1992. “They always joked that it was a mixed marriage because he was Sephardic and she was Ashkenazic,” said Richard. After his World War II service with the U.S. Coast Guard in Alameda, Calif., he had decided to live permanently in that state.

Helen F. Sherwin NTS’37 Ed’40, Boston, the coordinator of science and psychology at the Massachusetts General School of Nursing for 36 years, until it became the MGH Institute of Health Professions; March 16. She then served as the school’s archivist; from 1982 to 1999, she was nursing archivist at Boston University, retiring at age 83. She was a founding member of Boston’s Chorus Pro Musica, and for many years served as a volunteer tour guide at Boston’s Trinity Church.

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1938
Marie Lash Disend WEF’38, North Baldwin, Jan. 11.

Alan M. Lanard C’38 GEd’64, Boca Raton, Fla., Sept. 8, 2004.

Dr. Melville C. Rawnsley V’38, Roanoke, Va., a retired veterinarian; Feb. 16.

Dr. Laura Ross Venning M’38, Chapel Hill, N.C., a retired physician; Feb. 26, 2003.

 back to topDr. Jerome L. Weinstock C’38, Narbeth, Pa., a retired physician; Feb. 27.

1939
Amos D. Caryl WEF’39, Murrieta, Calif., Feb. 22.

George T. Guarnieri L’39, Philadelphia, a retired attorney; April 11. He had served as a Pennsylvania state legislator.

Jesse D. Pierson Jr. W’39, York, Pa., a store manager at Sears for more than 40 years; April 11. At Penn he was president of his fraternity, Alpha Chi Rho. He managed the Sears store in Hanover starting in 1949 and the Stroudsburg store beginning in 1957. He served on the executive committee or as president of numerous civic organizations, including Pocono Mountains Chamber of Commerce, Economic Development Council of Northeastern Pennsylvania, and Monroe County’s YMCA. He was elected a Monroe County commissioner in 1974, served as chair, and was reelected for a second term before leaving office in 1983. According to a 1991 profile in The Pocono Record, he “played an integral role in forming some of the county’s enduring economic and social programs—its children’s bureau, drug and alcohol abuse programs, housing authority, and many others.” He was reunion president of his Class, and a member of the Charles Custis Harrison Society. “His association with the University brought him joy all his life,” said his daughter Deborah. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy as a lieutenant aboard an escort carrier in the Atlantic and the Pacific.

Earl G. Wray Jr. WEv’39, Drexel Hill, Pa., Sept. 15, 2003.

Malcolm Wright WEF’39, Phoenix, Nov. 22.

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1940
Albert D. Brant W’40, Cockeysville, Md., July 1, 2004.

Edward Brody Ed’40, Philadelphia, founding owner of the Park Pleasant Nursing Home; March 31. During the late 1940s he and his brother-in-law converted an old boys’ school in southwest Philadelphia into the nursing facility. He began then-radical changes in nursing-home care, including restaurant-style dining, an activities program, and staffing registered nurses on every shift. The facility, which opened with 33 beds, now has 123. Later he initiated programs to help the nursing-home staff obtain better and diversified career training. About 10 years ago he turned the home over to his two daughters, Nancy Brody Kleinberg CW’69 (whose husband is Dr. Edward Loewenstein V’77) and Janet D. Brody CW’70, while continuing to work daily as its community-affairs director until earlier this year. He was a former president of the American College of Health Care Administrators. During World War II he was a lieutenant in the U.S. Army, training troops stateside.

Charles Conston W’40, Bala Cynwyd, Pa., retired president of the former Conston Corp., a retail clothing concern; April 8. In 1986 he expanded the business, which had been started by his parents, from hosiery, handbags, and dresses to more than 300 stores nationwide, including Famous Maid, Charles, Kristy’s Korner, and 16-Plus. He retired in 1990 when the company was sold. He was former vice-chair of United Way in Philadelphia. and of the Federation of Jewish Agencies of Greater Philadelphia. He was past president of the Jewish Community Centers of Greater Philadelphia and the Jewish Exponent newspaper. A former chair of the Federation of Allied Jewish Appeal in Philadelphia, he received its community award in 1977. During World War II he served with the U.S. Navy in the Atlantic and the Pacific.

Martha Gillies CW’40, Ann Arbor, Mich., Aug. 31, 2004.

Hon. Sol M. Linowitz WG’40 Hon’80, Washington, co-founder and former chair of the Xerox Corporation, diplomat, and recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom; March 18. He served as an attorney in the Office of Price Administration during World War II. Later, as a lawyer in Rochester, N.Y., he became friends with Joe Wilson, owner of the Haloid Corporation, who was interested in the recent invention of electrophotography. They paired to form Xerox. By 1956, Sol Linowitz, as vice president in charge of patents, obtained all rights to Chester F. Carlson’s invention. He became chair of Xerox in 1960. The company’s revenue climbed to $176 million the following year and was half a billion dollars by 1966. In 1966 he was appointed the U.S. representative to the Organization of the American States, a position he held until 1969. In 1977 President Jimmy Carter asked him to be a co-negotiator, with Ellsworth Bunker, for the Panama Canal treaties. During the acrimonious proceedings, Linowitz recalled driving down Constitution Avenue and seeing a hanging effigy of himself as part of a conservative protest against returning the canal to Panama. In 1979, following the Camp David Peace Accords, President Carter named him special ambassador to the Middle East, a position he held until 1981. Earlier, he had been an adviser to President John F. Kennedy and Senator Robert F. Kennedy. And he served as president of the National Urban League. He was a partner and senior counsel in the international law firm of Coudert Brothers from 1969 until his retirement in 1994. In speeches and a recent book, The Betrayed Profession, he lamented what he saw as declining mores in the legal profession. Some of his recommendations regarding fundamental changes in legal education, including an emphasis on ethics and humanities, were adopted at his alma mater, Cornell Law School, where he was an emeritus trustee. He was a director of Time, Inc., Pan Am, and the Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York. And he was a co-founder and former chair of the International Executive Service Corps, a volunteer program that sends American executives to developing countries. He was honorary board chair of the nonprofit Academy for Educational Development since 1990. In awarding him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998, President Bill Clinton commented that getting “advice from Sol Linowitz on international diplomacy is like getting trumpet lessons from the angel Gabriel.” His 1985 memoir, The Making of a Public Man, was published by Little Brown.

Caroline Goss Thompson OT’40, Madison, Wis., Dec. 4.

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1941
Helen M. Draper PSW’41, Philadelphia, Feb. 20.

William G. Feiker W’41, Saint Charles, Ill., a former executive in the publishing industry; Oct. 15, 2004. He began his career in advertising sales for Newsweek magazine. In 1960 he joined Hitchcock Publishing Co., where he became publisher of several magazines and a vice president. He worked for Ced Spring and Associates from 1972 until his death. A member of the First Congregational Church in Geneva, Ill., for 42 years, he served in many capacities and was honored as an elder emeritus. During World War II he was an ensign and then a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy, where he served in the Okinawa theater, until his discharge in 1946.

David W. Hilsee W’41, Oreland, Pa., a comptroller with Container Corporation of America for 42 years, until his retirement in 1988; Feb. 26. At Penn he was a member of Alpha Chi Rho fraternity. Following graduation he began his career as an industrial engineer for Leeds & Northrup. For many years he provided income-tax services to clients of modest means. During World War II he was a message encoder for the U.S. Coast Guard in Norfolk, Va., and was later based at the air station in Elizabeth City, N.C., where he flew helicopter search and rescue missions. One of his daughters is Linda L. Hilsee CW’67 GEd’68.

Maj. Gen. Winant Sidle L’41, Southern Pines, N.C., head of the commission of investigation following the U.S. invasion of Grenada in 1983; March 19. He enlisted in the Pennsylvania National Guard in 1940, earning a commission in 1941. During World War II he served in North Africa, France, Germany, Austria, and Italy, including the landing at Anzio. He joined the regular U.S. Army after the war. As chief of information in Vietnam, 1967-69, he defined the military rules, including the disciplining of reporters, covering the controversial war. From 1969 to 1973 he was chief of information for the Army, and then briefly was deputy assistant secretary of defense for public affairs. Retiring in 1975, he worked for the Association of the United States Army. In 1978 he joined Martin Marietta, where he was director of public relations and later its first director of corporate ethics. Following the invasion of Grenada in 1983, Maj. Gen. Sidle was asked to form and head a commission of inquiry, later known as the Sidle Commission. Made up of seven officers and seven journalists, it deliberated in Feb. 1984, considering reporters’ claims of censorship and the military’s insistence on secrecy and security. The commission concluded by affirming the rights of journalists and photographers to report on combat. It recommended that the Defense Department begin planning for news coverage during the planning of military operations, and that pools of reporters be created to protect both operational security and the safety of journalists in combat zones.

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1942
Irwin P. Boeshore, C’42 G’44, Gettysburg, Pa., April 10.

Louise W. Frantz Ed’42 GEd’43, Dallas, Pa., March 4.

Dr. Leonard Friedman D’42, Miramar, Fla., a retired dentist; March 4. He opened his first practice in East Orange, N.J., in 1946. In 1957 he founded the practice in Northfield, Vt., where he provided care to patients from New England and Canada until his retirement in 1981. An avid skier, he co-founded the Glen Ellen Ski Area. During his term as president of the Northfield Outing Club, he oversaw the building of a rope tow on the ski slope at Garvey Hill, where many area children learned to ski. During World War II, he served as a dental surgeon with the 92nd Medical Battalion of the U.S. Army Medical Corps, and as executive officer of Company C in England, France, and Germany for five campaigns. He also served as the medical officer for the 283rd Field Artillery Battalion when it operated as a POW camp at Furstenfieldbrük, Germany, where he oversaw the medical care of 55,000 prisoners of war. At the war’s end, Dr. Friedman was part of the medical teams that liberated two of Germany’s prison camps, providing emergency medical and dental care to the survivors. He was discharged as a captain in 1946.

Horace M. Hokanson Jr. EE’42, Pittsburgh, Feb. 8, 2004.

Dr. Morton Kolson V’42, Philadelphia, a retired veterinarian; Nov. 30, 2000.

Sydney J. Neal W’42, South Chelmsford, Mass., Jan. 23.

Jean Maguire Seely G’42, Kingston Springs, Tenn., July 7, 2004.

Dr. David D. Sosnow D’42, Hollywood, Fla., a retired dentist; Sept. 20, 2003.

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1943
James H. Branche W’43, Albany, N.Y., Dec. 2, 2003.

Edward S. Dewey W’43, Falls Church, Va., Feb. 11.

Dr. John Foderaro C’43 M’46, Newtown Square, Pa., a retired physician and occupational-medicine consultant; April 6. From 1949 to 1974 he maintained a private practice in Frankford and was medical director at the Frankford Arsenal. For the next 12 years he was a toxicologist and plant physician for the DuPont Co. in Newport, Del. He then became a medicine consultant at a DuPont plant in Boothwyn and at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard until retiring in 1995. Following World War II he served in the U.S. Army Medical Corps in occupied Japan.

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1944
Robert R. King W’44, Altamonte Springs, Fla., Jan. 11. Following his retirement he volunteered in prison ministry.

Donna Hart Pollock CW’44, Clemson, S.C., Feb. 23.

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1945
Dr. Ellis L. Silberman C’45 GM’50, Van Nuys, Calif., a retired physician; March 20.

back to topConrad Wilson C’45, West Dummerston, Vt., March 19.

1946
Dr. Thomas M. McMillan III M’46 GM’50, Medford, N.J., a retired cardiologist who established the cardiac-care unit at the old Memorial Hospital of Burlington County; April 7. He became head of cardiology in 1963 and chief of internal medicine in 1968. “He started in cardiology before we had all the fancy bells and whistles,” said Dr. Frank Fish, the hospital’s head of cardiology. Using a stethoscope, Dr. McMillan “mastered the art of listening to a patient’s heart, taking their history, and coming up with diagnosis and treatment.” His father, Dr. Thomas M. McMillan Jr. M’17, had been a professor of cardiology at the University’s medical school.

Barbara C. Reinhart CW’46, Victorville, Calif., Feb. 3.

Dr. Benjamin H. Sullivan GM’46, Sarasota, Fla., one of the first neurosurgeons to practice in southwest Florida; Nov. 22. He was a member of the University’s Hawthorne Surgical Society. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army and earned the Bronze Star, Purple Heart, and Oak Leaf Cluster.

back to topMorton L. Weitzner CE’46, New York, April 7, 2004.

1947
Dr. Dorothy D. Gondos-Beers Gr’47, Fairfax, Va., Feb. 15.

Elliott Hansell W’47, Salem, Ohio, August 2004.

John H. Mohring GEd’47, Rockton, Ill., June 5, 2004.

David K. Odell W’47, Green Lake, Maine, April 3. He worked for the DuPont Company in Wilmington, Del., from 1950 until his retirement in 1978. He was active in the First Congregational United Church of Brewer, Maine, which he served as a trustee for three years. During World War II he served with the U.S. Navy in the Pacific.

back to topGeorge E. Ready C’47, Gainesville, Fla., Sept. 7, 2002.

1948
George A. Applegate W’48, Woodbury, N.J., Nov. 9.

Paul H. Beard W’48, Hagerstown, Md., Dec. 27.

Paul E. Butler W’48, Southbury, Conn., Feb. 2.

Paul E. Carter W’48, Huntingdon Valley, Pa., April 9.

Dr. Roy R. Greening GM’48, Juneau, Alaska, a retired physician; Feb. 5.

Anthony S. Minisi W’48 L’52, Paoli, Pa., a retired partner of the Philadelphia law firm of Wolf, Block, Schorr & Solis-Cohen and a trustee of the University; May 5. Known as “Skippy,” at Penn he was a star freshman football player; he went on to play two more years as an All-American wingback for George A. Munger Ed’33. After graduating, he was a first-round draft pick for the New York Giants; he played for a year before entering law school. A litigator with Wolf Block, he had been a partner since 1960. Although he retired in 1997, he continued going into the office every day until 2004, according to one of his sons, Brian A. Minisi C’90. He was a former chair of the Committee of Seventy, a nonprofit, nonpartisan political watchdog organization for the Philadelphia area. He was a past chair of the Philadelphia Bar’s board of governors and past president of the Lawyers Club of Philadelphia. A member of the Eastern Association of Intercollegiate Football Officials for 30 years, he helped officiate a game every Saturday. He was a former president of the officials’ association and the Maxwell Football Club, which honors local players and coaches. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1985. A trustee of the University, he was past president of the Varsity Club, the Football Club, and the Class of 1948. And he established an endowment for Penn football. Also a member of the track team while at Penn, he later served as chair of the Friends of the Penn Relays. He was a veteran of the U.S. Army Reserves. His two other sons are Dr. Anthony J. Minisi C’76 M’80 and Joseph J. Minisi C’80.

back to topJohn S. Renninger C’48 L’51, Newtown, Pa., a Pennsylvania state legislator from 1964 to 1978; April 2. During his tenure he helped sponsor open-housing legislation and helped lay the groundwork for no-fault insurance, according to one of his daughters. Along with his regular legal clientele, he did pro bono work. He closed his Newtown office in 2004. A history buff, he participated in the annual Washington’s Crossing event on Christmas Day for 30 years, portraying Lt. James Monroe. He also helped establish the Pennsbury Society, which was committed to Bucks County history. He played clarinet in a Dixieland jazz band at charity events. His daughters are Dr. K. Ann Renninger CW’73 and Sarah R. Henriques Nu’79, whose husband is Richard C. Henriques C’78 WG’81.

1949
Col. Ward T. Blacklock WG’49, Austin, Tex., Dec. 12,. 2000.

Fred A. Blencowe WG’49, San Clemente, Calif., Nov. 1.

William Graboyes WEv’49, Broomall, Pa., April 14.

Dr. Harry L. Hoch M’49, Milton, Del., a family practitioner for 25 years and the former director of the emergency department at the Beebe Medical Center of Lewes; Nov. 8. A lifelong outdoorsman, he walked across most of the rural parts of the Eastern Shore, hunting quail with his dogs. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army.

back to topDr. Peter V. Van Schoonhoven M’49, Dallas, Tex., a retired physician who served on the selection committee of the first astronauts that landed on the Moon; Feb. 4. His medical practice included surgery, clinical pathology, and hematology. During the 1960s he served as medical director of the Lovelace Clinic in Albuquerque, N.M. He later served as executive vice president for medical affairs at Blood Systems Inc. in Scottsdale, Ariz. As a member of the Joint Commission of Accreditation of Hospitals, he was responsible for writing many of the administrative standards in use today. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and as an officer during the Korean War.

1950
Leon L. Berman EE’50, Philadelphia, Feb. 26.

Thomas R. Bradford W’50, La Jolla, Calif., Feb. 27.

Frank J. Evan WG’50, Silver Spring, Md., July 18, 2004.

William T. Fuller WG’50, Plattsmouth, Neb., Jan. 8.

Leland N. Gibbs Jr. W’50, Vero Beach, Fla., a retired businessman; March 30. After moving to Vero Beach in 1985, he served on the Indian River County Planning and Zoning Commission. He was a board member and former chair of the county chapter of the American Red Cross and president of the Fort Pierce Food Bank. He served as president of the Veterans Council of Indian River County from the early 1990s until 2003, during which he helped organize the veterans’ services on Memorial Island during national holidays. Twenty years ago he started a volunteer service with a donated station wagon to allow local veterans free transportation to the veterans’ hospitals in Miami and West Palm Beach. His endeavor expanded into two vans and now a new 21-seat bus, which bears a plaque honoring him. During World War II he served as a B-17 waist gunner for the U.S. Army Air Corps, flying missions out of England. One of three surviving crew members when his bomber was shot down over Germany, he spent 16 months in a POW camp there.

Leo Goldstein GCE’50, Elkins Park, Pa., a former Philadelphia commissioner of streets; March 14. He had been an engineer, then deputy commissioner of the Department of Licenses and Inspection. In the 1960s he helped draft the department’s new building code, which established stringent requirements for the use of materials that could withstand weather and fire. He served as streets commissioner from 1970 to 1972, after which he worked as an engineering consultant. And he taught engineering for Temple University’s evening division for many years. He was a founding member of the Germantown Jewish Center. After retiring he was a chief engineer of the Dade County (Fla.) Condominium Coalition. He was active in various organizations, including the Nature Conservancy and the Southern Poverty Law Center. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy, helping to develop radar technology.

John Kara EE’50, Delran, N.J., Feb. 10.

Dr. Thomas J. Matthews V’50, Seattle, a retired veterinarian; Jan. 25.

Ernest L. Whitney Jr. W’50, Old Saybrook, Conn., a retired business executive for Right Associates; July 11, 2004. Known as “Bud,” at Penn he was a member of Mask & Wig and Sigma Nu fraternity. He had also worked for Proctor & Gamble, Lever Bros., Swift & Company, and Drake, Beam, Morin. At one time he was the CEO of Helm Products Corp. He had served with the U.S. Navy in the Philippines.

Howard T. Wireback G’50, Lancaster, Pa., a teacher of history and social studies for the Lancaster school district for 35 years; May 10, 2004. He taught at the former Lancaster Township Junior High School and later at Wheatland Junior High School. He was instrumental in setting up the safety patrol at Wheatland and in 1971 received the Pennsylvania Governor’s Safety Award for outstanding contributions to traffic safety. He also coached wrestling and basketball at the school. And he taught for one year at Millersville State Teachers College, where he was an assistant professor in the history and social-studies department. An undefeated amateur boxer in his youth, he was an avid tennis player and camp counselor. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a first lieutenant and unit commander with the 830th Engineer Aviation Battalion. He served in Normandy, the Rhineland, and central Europe and received four battle stars, the American Campaign Medal, and the World War II Victory Medal.

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1951
Dr. Samuel P. Beard Jr. GEd’51, Philadelphia, April 11.

Joseph Spenser Grubb W’51, Ardmore, Pa., March 30. During World War II he served in the U.S. Navy.

Charles O. Hagan Jr. W’51, Bokeelia, Fla., a retired attorney and specialist in addictions; Jan. 3. He practiced law in Philadelphia for a number of years before moving to Florida, where he opened a marine store, Charlie’s Locker, in Fort Lauderdale. After earning a master’s degree in addictions in 1975, he implemented and taught different treatment and survey techniques for alcohol and drug addictions in national programs throughout the U.S. He returned to law in 1979, becoming the first attorney on Pine Island. In 1986, with the help of a Florida Supreme Court justice, he started and ran Florida Lawyers Assistance Inc., an organization to treat and rehabilitate Florida attorneys who are impaired by addictions. He remained as consultant to the organization after his retirement. He was a board member of Southwest Florida Addiction Services, Inc., for 26 years. The city of Fort Myers and Lee County commissioners named Nov. 30, 2004 the Charles O. Hagan Jr. Day. In December he received awards from the Florida Bar Association and the justices of the Florida Supreme Court. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps, 1945-47. His former wife is Anne Zentgraf Hagan CW’48, and two of his children are Theresa J. Hagan CW’73 and Dr. James F. Hagan C’75 V’99.

Thomas P. Henry Jr. GEd’51, Red Hill, Pa., March 7.

Dr. Jess S. Hull C’51 M’55, Phoenix, a retired ophthalmologist; Nov. 12.

Dr. John H. McClendon Gr’51, Ashland, Ore., a teacher of plant physiology at the University of Delaware from 1954 to 1965, and the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, from 1965 until his retirement in 1989; June 22, 2004. He was the author of many scientific and lay articles on population, recycling, evolution, and plant physiology. He remained active in plant and environmental groups following his retirement. During World War II he studied Japanese and then served as an officer in the U.S. Army in General Douglas MacArthur’s headquarters in Tokyo, 1945-47.

Dr. Martin F. Murray C’51, Lakewood, N.J., a professor of economics at Brookdale College from its inception in 1970 until his retirement; March 19. Earlier, he taught at Marlboro High School and worked as an economist for the U.S. Department of Commerce in Washington. He wrote Careers in Nursing Home Administration. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and then became a lieutenant in the U.S. Army’s transportation corps during the Korean War, where he served at Governor’s Island, N.Y., and in Pusan, Korea. He also served with the New Jersey National Guard as a photo-journalist for The Guard Magazine. He remained an active member of the Marine Corps Reserve of Toms River.

Dr. Nathan Reingold Gr’51, Bethesda, Md., senior historian emeritus at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History; Oct. 30, 2004. After intending to go into medicine, he became a historian of science, studying under his mentor at Penn, Richard A. Shyrock. He worked for the National Archives in Washington from 1951 to 1959, when he joined the staff of the science and technology division at the Library of Congress. In 1966 Smithsonian Secretary S. Dillon Ripley appointed him as founding editor of The Papers of Joseph Henry, the first secretary of the Smithsonian, who is acknowledged as the inventor of the electric motor and the father of daily weather forecasts. During Dr. Reingold’s 19-year tenure, five volumes of the papers were published; the project remains ongoing. In 1987 he became senior historian at the National Museum of American History, retiring in 1993. His numerous publications include two volumes on the history of science in America, from the 19th-century through 1939. In addition to his museum appointments, he held a senior post-doctoral fellowship at Yale University and taught at Penn and at Yale, and Johns Hopkins universities, and the University of London. A founding member of the governing council of the Rockefeller Archive Center in New York, he served on it from 1974 to 1990. Last November, the History of Science Society posthumously awarded him a special citation for his contributions as a pioneer in the history of science. Its executive committee has recommended that the organization’s annual prize for the best graduate student essay be renamed in his honor.

Dr. Florence M. Smith GM’51, Mount Holly Springs, Pa., a retired physician; May 11, 2004.

Kenneth M. Wilson G’51, Punta Gorda, Fla., a glass historian and the retired senior curator of American decorative arts at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Mich.; March 29. He began his curatorial career at the Delaware State Museum in 1951. Moving on to Old Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts, he became chief curator there in 1963. For the next 10 years he was curator, assistant director, and chief curator at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York. From 1973 to 1985 he was director of collections and preservation at the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village; he retired as senior curator in 1987. Earlier he had worked in his father’s printing shop and as a machinist at the Bethlehem Steel Company in Pennsylvania. A meticulous researcher, he wrote numerous articles and books about glass in both its decorative and utilitarian forms, including Glass in New England (1959) and a complementary volume, New England Glass and Glassmaking (1972). He was co-author, with Helen McKearin, of the classic American Bottles and Flasks and Their Ancestry (1979). He compiled a two-volume catalog of the collection of the Toledo Museum of Art, published in 1994 as American Glass, 1760-1830. At his death he was working on a two-volume treatment of the Gundersen-Pairpoint Glass Company, a successor to the historic Mt. Washington Glass Works of Boston. The first volume, Mt. Washington and Pairpoint Glass, will be published posthumously. During World War II he served with the U.S. Army in Europe and received a Purple Heart.

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1952
James M. Adkins III W’52, Dresher, Pa., Sept. 7, 2003.

Dr. Edwin B. Bronner Gr’52, Kennett Square, Pa., a retired history professor and librarian of Haverford College, and former curator of its Quaker Collection; March 8. He taught history at Temple University before joining the history department at Haverford in 1959. He later became curator of the Quaker Collection there. During the 1960s he initiated a post-baccalaureate program at the college to encourage African American college graduates to seek advanced degrees, which served as a model for similar programs at other colleges. In 1969 he became the college librarian. He retired as librarian and professor of history in 1986, but remained curator of the Quaker Collection until 1990. In 1984 he was honored by the Heritage Commission of Delaware County for making the collection available to the public. Dr. Bronner, whose Quaker ancestors settled in Pennsylvania and Delaware in the 17th century, was the author of three books about William Penn, and wrote numerous scholarly articles on Quakerism. As chair in the 1970s of the Friends World Committee for Consultation, he visited Quakers on five continents in seven months. He served on the boards of the American Friends Service Committee, Pendle Hill, the Quaker study center in Wallingford, Pa., and the William Penn Charter School. He was past president of the Friends Historical Association and the Friends Historical Society. As a conscientious objector during World War II, he did alternative service in a state mental hospital in New Jersey and volunteered to participate in medical experiments being done in Philadelphia for treating hepatitis.

Lawrence A. Keller CE’52, Jamison, Pa., a former vice president of Penn Mutual Insurance Co., where he evaluated the company’s real estate investments; April 22. He joined the firm in the 1960s and retired in 1988. After flying reconnaissance planes for the U.S. Army during the Korean War, he served in the National Guard, retiring as a major general in 1990. Earlier he had worked in his family’s metal fabrication business.

back to topAdam N. Zaccaria WEv’52, Philadelphia, April 24, 2001.

1953
John C. Garner L’53, Bryn Mawr, Pa., a retired attorney and bank vice president; April 2. He worked at General Electric before receiving his law degree. In 1953 he joined the Philadelphia law firm of Drinker, Biddle & Reath, where he specialized in trusts and estates. After retiring as partner in 1987, he became a vice president of the Rittenhouse Trust Co., now Haverford Trust Co. During World War II he served in the U.S. Army, stateside.

James C. O’Brien WEv’53, Havertown, Pa., Jan. 31.

William B. Scatchard Jr. L’53, Moorestown, N.J., an attorney for many years and a retired principal at Capehart & Scatchard of Mount Laurel; April 9. He was a past president of the Camden County Bar Association and former chair of its ethics committee. In 1990 he received an award for Outstanding Trial Lawyer. He was a past president of the Pennsauken Board of Education, the Camden Home for Children and SPCC, and the YMCA Camp Ockanickon in Medford.

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1954
Dr. Robert P. Gash C’54, Bloomfield Hills, Mich., a physician who practiced medicine in Michigan for 40 years; Feb. 8. At Penn he was a member of Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity. His wife is Barbara Sher Gash CW’55.

Yvonne Morin Homan SW’54, Chicago, March 6.

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1955
John J. Gurski W’55, Reading, Pa., a retired teacher, football coach, and administrator; Feb. 28. He was a social studies teacher at Wilson High School from 1964 to 1978 and served as vice principal from 1978 until his retirement in 1994. He coached six seasons of football at Minersville High School in Schuylkill County and 19 seasons at Wilson High School, 1964-82, ending with a record of 151-44-4, the most wins in Berks County history at that time. He had three unbeaten seasons: 1967, 1968, and 1978 and he won tri-county league titles in 1967 and 1969. He was an inductee into the Wilson High School, Berks County, and Pennsylvania Sports Halls of Fame and the Berks Coaches Hall of Fame. Wilson High School’s football stadium bears his name.

Dr. John B. Longenhagen M’55 GM’59, Allentown, Pa., a retired physician; Aug. 20, 2004.

Dr. Thomas H. Pettit M’55, Provo, Utah, a retired physician; March 10.

Dr. James J. Stanko C’55, Salem, N.C., Feb. 4.

Dr. Archie R. Young Gr’55, Montclair, N.J., Nov. 3.

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1956
Dr. Zefferino A. Aversa Jr. GM’56, Philadelphia, the retired chief of otolaryngology at Methodist Hospital, where he served on the staff for 42 years; March 21. Known as “Jeff,” he practiced medicine in Philadelphia for 50 years and was on the staff of most of the region’s large hospitals until his retirement in 1998. He also maintained a private practice in South Philadelphia, where he “treated patients whether or not they could pay,” said his wife Dolores. “He had a big heart for the underdog,” which extended to stray animals he had rescued.

Edward G. Bernstein C’56, Carmel, Calif., a retired attorney; April 14.

Mildred Pollock Bijur CW’56, Philadelphia, March 20.

Col. Ralph R. Chapman GM’56, Bethesda, Md., Dec. 4.


Dr. Alan N. Goodman C’56, Boca Raton, Fla., a retired physician; Aug. 23, 2002.

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1958
Michael L. Tarnopol W’58, New York, a vice-chair of Bear Stearns, vice-chair of the Trustees of the University, and an overseer of the Wharton School; May 23. He began his career as a trainee at Lehman Brothers. In 1975 he was hired to run the international department at Bear Stearns, a position he held for 10 years. When Bear Stearns changed from a partnership to a stock company in 1985, he became a managing director. At the time of his death, he was both a vice chair and chair of its investment-banking division. He was a board member of Jones Apparel Group, Inc. In 1995 he received the Wharton Graduate Association’s Distinguished Service Award. Mickey Tarnopol (as he was widely known) was a trustee of the Prostate Cancer Foundation and of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where he served on its joint finance and funding committee and budget subcommittee. He was a co-founder of the center’s Golf Invitational to Benefit Prostate Cancer Research. Also active in Jewish organizations, he served on the board of the UJA-Federation of New York; the American Jewish Committee honored him with its Herbert H. Lehman Award in 1996, for his work with its national leadership council and various campaigns. An avid polo player (he took up the sport at 42 years), he had served as a director of the U.S. Equestrian Team. His wife is Lynne Lichtenstein Tarnopol CW’60, and his daughters are Lori Tarnopol Moore C’83 and Lisa Tarnopol Silverman C’85.

Burton K. Werner WG’58, St. Louis, president of Safety Mutual Casualty Corp. from 1976 to 1987 and CEO emeritus of Safety National Casualty Corp.; Feb. 28. He was a former board member of Delphi Financial Group. He was an ardent supporter of the Hui No’eau Visual Arts Center, the Maui Arts and Cultural Center, and the Maui Memorial Medical Center Foundation, in Hawaii. His wife is Joanna Hill Werner PT’59.

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1959
Dr. Francis W. Warlow Gr’59, Carlisle, Pa., June 27, 2002.

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1960
Joseph F. Dougherty Jr. W’60, Erdenheim, Pa., Jan. 11.

Dr. Walter H. Fox GD’60, West Linn, Ore., a retired dentist; Feb. 12.

Stanley Krupinski WEv’60, Villas, N.J., Feb. 19.

Stephen O. Nall GAr’60, Dallas, July 25, 2004.

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1961
Michael T. Duncan C’61, San Francisco, the owner of Uncle John’s Records in Sioux City, Iowa, for nearly 30 years; Aug. 17, 2000. Earlier he had taught for a time.

Dr. Richard A. McFeely V’61 GV’67, Chestertown, Md., a retired veterinarian; March 26.

Dr. Louis W. Wasser V’61, Washington, N.J., a retired veterinarian; March 4. After operating his practice from his home, he opened the Brass Castle Animal Hospital in Washington in 1972. Earlier he had practiced in Flemington. He was one of the original members of the Warren County Agriculture Development Board and coordinated rabies clinics in the region for the past 15 years. And he was a past president of the Northwest Veterinary Medical Society. He was an avid horse-shoe pitcher.

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1963
Lucius M. Quinney C’63, San Diego, March 20. “He was very proud of his alma mater and enjoyed being connected to Penn through these many years after his graduation,” said his wife, Carolyn.

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1964
Lewis A. Belanger W’64, Newbury, Mass., Dec. 19.

 Dr. David M. Kozart M’64 GM’70, Philadelphia, vice chair of ophthalmology at the University’s Scheie Eye Institute; March 16. Having trained under Dr. Harold G. Scheie GM’40 Hon’78, he joined the Penn faculty in 1970 as assistant professor of ophthalmology and was promoted to associate professor in 1979. He was acting chair of the department in 1990. Throughout his career he held many distinguished positions in the School of Medicine, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, and at the Presbyterian Medical Center. He served as vice chair of the medical-legal committee and chair of the internal residency-review committee at HUP; was president of the medical staff at Presbyterian from 1996 to 1998; and chaired the medical faculty senate, 1995-96. He was also a member of the committee on academic freedom and responsibility of the School of Medicine and served on the search committee for the chair of the department of anesthesia. “David was the most honest and ethical physician that I’ve ever met,” said Dr. Stephen E. Orlin GM’86, a colleague at the Scheie Eye Institute. “He was the quintessential, comprehensive ophthalmologist with an encyclopedic foundation of knowledge.” Stuart Fine, the Scheie’s executive director, called Dr. Kozart “a fantastic teacher … who had an astonishingly deep and broad knowledge of ophthalmology … He would ask penetrating questions, designed to bring out the best in the residents.” A memorial fund in his name has been established at Scheie. An accomplished woodworker, Dr. Kozart crafted furniture for his children and rocking horses of his own design for his grandchildren. His wife is Elizabeth Lubell Kozart GCP’79 and their son is Dr. Michael F. Kozart M’93.

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1970
Dr. Beth Tucker Showell GEd’70, Philadelphia, a retired science teacher for the Philadelphia School system and a former teacher of nutrition at the University’s School of Nursing; April 2. Following her retirement she began a second career as a baker. “Her carrot cake was the most popular dessert on the menu at Abbraccio,” an Italian restaurant in West Philadelphia, wrote Jody Kolodzey G’97, who served with her on the arts committee that produces the Crossroads concert series at the Calvary Center for Culture and Community. An active member of the Calvary Methodist Church, Beth founded and ran the Calvary Café for the concert series. She was a former president of Cedar Park Neighbors, a board member of the University City Arts League, and a weekly volunteer at the Clark Park Farmers Market, among other community activities. “If it had to do with bettering West Philly, physically or culturally, it had to do with Beth,” said Kolodzey.

1971
Spencer I. Browne W’71, Miami Beach, head of an investment firm; April 21. His father is Lynn E. Browne W’44.

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1972
Dr. Elizabeth Lobur Feussner V’72, Philadelphia, a veterinarian; March 14.

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1973
William T. Gruber WG’73, New York, April 12.

Jeffrey D. Smith C’73, Las Vegas, Sept. 5, 2004.

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1975
Judith R. Boynton GEd’75, Salisbury, Conn., Oct. 10, 2004.

Dr. Carole Cherry Phillips Gr’75, Wynnewood, Pa., a financial adviser who taught women how to manage money, and a former instructor at the Wharton School; April 7. She was an instructor in finance at Wharton during the 1970s, before joining the trust division of the old Provident National Bank in Philadelphia. For 10 years she was president of C.C. Phillips, a financial planning firm, until becoming vice president of Wescott Financial Planning Group in 1991. She ran financial workshops for women with different needs, from poor women with few financial resources to wealthy widows with no money-managing experience. Dr. Phillips contributed articles to Money magazine and was the author of three books: The Money Workbook for Women; Money Talk: The Last Taboo; and The New Money Workbook for Women. She served on the boards of Women’s Way, Business Executives for Nuclear Age Concerns, and the Cherry Foundation, a family fund for college scholarships. The annual Carole Phillips Lecture at the Philadelphia Free Library was established in her honor last year. Her husband is Dr. Almarin Phillips W’48 G’49.

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1977
Dr. Sergio V. Proserpi GM’77, Wyomissing, Pa., a retired plastic surgeon; Aug. 7, 2004.

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1981
Dr. Stephen W. Lebourdais D’81, Indian Orchard, Mass., a dentist; Jan. 5.

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1989
Dr. Freddy Stark Gr’89, Philadelphia, an instructor in gross anatomy, histology, and neuroanatomy at the School of Medicine; March 7. An expert in electron microscopy analysis, he joined the staff of the medical school as a teaching assistant in 1984 and became an instructor to first-year medical students in 1992. He created Start Exploring “Gray’s Anatomy”: a Fact-Filled Coloring Book (Running Press, 1991). Though targeted for children, it has been used as a textbook for nursing students because of its clear explanation of body parts, according to his wife, Margaret M. Yetter, who works in the University’s Information Systems and Computing department. An accomplished martial-arts practitioner, he held black belts in judo, karate, and ju jitsu from the U.S. Martial Arts Association, which inducted him into its Hall of Fame in 2003. Since 1986 he was the head instructor of Penn’s Martial Arts Club, the Chu Do Kwan, and the South Central Tae Kwan Do Association. Two prizes in his name have been established at the Medical School. In addition, the Martial Arts Club and his students are seeking to dedicate the lawn outside of Goddard Laboratories, where he taught and practiced martial arts for 16 years, in his memory.

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1999
Dr. Dana Frederick V’99, Asheville, N.C., a veterinarian who practiced in Alexandria, Va.; March 27.

Faculty & Staff
Dr. David M. Kozart. See Class of 1964.

Dr. Carole Cherry Phillips. See Class of 1975.

Dr. Nathan Reingold. See Class of 1951.

Dr. Herman P. Schwan, Radnor, Pa., the Alfred Fitler Moore Professor Emeritus at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering; March 17. Before joining the University faculty in 1950, he was an associate professor at the University of Frankfurt and associate director of the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics. In 1947 he came to the United States to accept a position at the Aeromedical Equipment Laboratory of the U.S. Naval Base in Philadelphia. He joined the School of Medicine faculty in 1950 and, the following year, joined the faculty of the Moore School of Electrical Engineering. In 1952 he was appointed head of the electromagnetic division of the Moore School and in 1961 chair of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences group on biomedical electronic engineering. In 1972 he helped establish the University’s Department of Bioengineering, which he briefly chaired, 1973-74. He retired in 1983, but continued lecturing for another 15 years. A pioneer in biophysics and bioengineering, Dr. Schwan has been credited with, among other accomplishments, being one of the first in the field to warn against the dangers of electromagnetic fields: His letter to the U.S. Navy in 1953, proposing a safe limit for human exposure to microwave energy, became the basis for exposure standards. In 1965 he chaired the committee that established the first U.S. exposure limit for radiofrequency energy for the National Standards Institute. He was also known for developing practical applications for post-World War II technology, including the microwave oven; and for devising experimental means to obtain accurate data in the difficult low-frequency region. Dr. Schwan published 250 scientific papers and presented more than 300 lectures. He supervised the Ph.D theses of 18 students, including the School of Electrical Engineering’s first bioengineering doctoral student in 1953. He was the first recipient of the Bioelectromagnetics Society’s d’Arsonval Award, in 1985. He also received, in 2000, the Otto Schmidt Award for exceptional contributions to the field of medicine and bioengineering. And he was awarded the Edison Medal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His daughters are Barbara Glaser CW’74, whose husband is Gareth E. Glaser C’74; Margaret A. Schwan C’77 WG’80; and twins Carolyn A. Schwan C’84 and Catherine A. Schwan C’84.

Dr. Beth Tucker Showell. See Class of 1970.

Dr. Freddy Stark. See Class of 1989.

Neil Welliver, Lincolnville, Maine, chair of Penn’s Graduate School of Fine Arts from 1966 until his retirement in 1989; April 5. Before coming to Penn he taught at Yale, his alma mater, from 1956 to 1966. Known for his large-scale landscapes that embraced the beauty and mystery of the Maine woods, he painted oil sketches en plein air, then translated these studies into canvases that were as large as 8 by 10 feet. His works are included in the collections of many museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Influenced by Josef Albers, with whom he had studied at Yale, his style evolved from abstract color-field paintings to domestic watercolors, and eventually the larger canvases of the Maine woods. The art critic Robert Hughes called his huge paintings “among the strongest images in modern American art,” adding that the pieces contain “an emotional intensity that goes beyond the ordinary limits of realism.” After moving permanently to Maine in 1970, Neil Welliver commuted to his teaching position at Penn for 19 years. In 1975 his first home and studio were destroyed by fire, after which he rebuilt. In his work he said he was searching for “places of power. For me these places are often nondescript corners, small things … I can’t put their meaning in words, but I try to do it in paint.” Poet Mark Strand, in writing of the corpus, said, “The woods are not only his, they are him. That wildness, those turbulent waters, those trees and rock-strewn hilltops—they are the images by which Welliver chooses to be seen and through which he sees himself.”


©2005 The Pennsylvania Gazette
Last modified 08/25/05

 

 

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