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In support of food trucks, recognizing community service, Alumni Weekend notes.

THE PENN EXPERIENCE: THE QUAD, HEY DAY ... FOOD TRUCKS?
   While driving back to Washington, I stopped to have lunch on campus. I was happy to see that the Magic Carpet was right where I'd left it, as was its neighbor, the Mexican truck. Business was brisk on the sunny day. The proliferation of new trucks affirmed their popularity. So now the University wants to move and remove the trucks, creating truck ghettos somewhere out of sight? ["Gazetteer," October]
   How many alumni, faculty, and staff have left Penn to lament at lunch, "I wish we had those food trucks here," then proceeded to tell their co-students, co-workers, and anyone else who would listen about the joys of food-truck dining! The vegetarian meals of the Magic Carpet are far better fare than the hot dogs and potato knishes we resorted to in New York. Blaagh!! The food trucks are as much a part of the Penn experience as Hey Day or the Quad. Leave the trucks alone!
PHYLLIS FUNG , C'89
Washington, D.C.

GREEKS PERFORM COMMUNITY SERVICE YEAR-IN, YEAR-OUT
   Dr. Judith Rodin's article on community service ["From College Hall," June] lists several examples of Penn volunteers working in West Philadelphia. I would like to add one oft-overlooked item: Members of fraternities and sororities perform community service year-in and year-out as an integral part of their membership in a house. It is easy (and sensational) to bash fraternities and the Greek system in general when individual members are accused of committing antisocial acts. The Gazette should portray a more balanced picture of fraternity and sorority life by reporting, at least occasionally, on the positive efforts of the dedicated brothers and sisters and on the volunteer leaders of those activities.
DANIEL GREENBERG, EAS'86
Pittsburgh, Pa.

FIFTY YEARS DOESN'T SEEM LIKE SO MUCH
   There are innumerable things I could say about the delightful 50th Reunion of our Class of 1947 this past May, but I'll mention only one. Our big 50th anniversary dinner was held in the large exhibit hall on the top floor of the University Museum. There, intermingled with sarcophagi and mummy cases, were our dinner tables where we celebrated a joyous reacquaintance. I was seated by a beautiful mummy case adjacent to our table, enjoying myself greatly, and then realized that the guy next to me had been dead for 5,000 years!
ROBERT W. SHOEMAKER
C'47, G'50, Gr'51
Naperville, Ill.

FUTURE PENNSYLVANIANS ON PARADE
   The verity of alma mater was proven on Alumni Day, May 17. The warm glow on Locust Walk rendered the chill wind null and void. The friendliness, the smiles, the greetings -- one couldn't ask for more.
   The many beautiful future Pennsylvanians, in strollers and carriages, in arms, on shoulders, or walking, were great to see. Their presence made a beautiful walk more beautiful. Then if ever, spirits soar.
   Thanks for the therapy.
MORRIS BRAILOVE, W'27
Jamesburg, N.J.

TOO SMALL HONOR FOR HONORARY DEGREE RECIPENTS
   I am writing to point out the very poor coverage given to the eight honorary-degree recipients on page 15 ["Gazetteer," June]. Surely these outstanding individuals could have been given larger type, and maybe even pictures, to point out the importance of these honorary degrees to the University.
ROBERT L. SMITH, W'43
Elmont, N.Y.

WELCOME BACK, DR. HACKNEY
   It is good to see Dr. Sheldon Hackney throw off the shackles of Washington politics, but even better to have him back on campus at Penn ["Gazetteer," June]. As president, Sheldon Hackney did so much to make the University great, and now he will make available his knowledge, experience, and outstanding personality to the students and faculty. Sheldon and Lucy Hackney bring "class" to the University.
MORTON H. WILNER, W'30
Washington, D.C.

BELATED TRIBUTE
   I was saddened by the death of Dr. E. Dale Saunders ["Obituaries," April 1996]. He was a tremendous influence on me. The several courses I took from him taught me much, not just about Japanese civilization and the history and development of Buddhism, but about being a scholar. In addition to being an excellent teacher, he was a great role model. I always regarded him with awe for his depth and breadth of knowledge, but at the same time I always felt that he was concerned that I actually learned something -- not just the subject, but how to think and study and learn generally. I regret that he passed away before I could tell him this.
AEON J. SKOBLE, C'86
Department of Philosophy
Southeast Missouri State University



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