Penn in the News

“Newsworks,” WHYY Radio (Philadelphia) — October 6, 2014

David Barnes of the School of Arts & Sciences talks about his rotten coffee event and yellow fever.


NBC News (Philadelphia) — October 5, 2014

Philippe Bourgois of the School of Arts & Sciences and the Perelman School of Medicine discusses the need for a database that would track prescription painkiller distribution in order to identify patients who move from multiple doctors to obtain more medication.


Washington Post — October 3, 2014

Olivia Mitchell of the Wharton School is cited for co-authoring a study that surveyed levels of financial literacy.


Scientific American — October 3, 2014

Alison Sweeney of the School of Arts & Sciences is highlighted for researching clams and living iridescent cells.


New York Times — October 3, 2014

The Law School’s David Skeel, described as a Christian apologist, and post-doctoral fellow Patrick Arsenault of the Perelman School of Medicine, an atheist, are featured for their friendship amidst contrasting values.


Washington Post — October 2, 2014

Matthew Blaze of the School of Engineering and Applied Science explains the type of backdoor in smartphones that would be used to “either introduce or exacerbate a flaw in the software.”


Fox News — October 2, 2014

Alison Sweeney of the School of Arts & Sciences discusses her research on how giant clams harness the sun.


Slate.com — October 2, 2014

Anita Henderson of the Wharton School is mentioned for surveying local hiring managers by playing them tapes of potential job applicants and asking them to rate the applicants’ job suitability based on their voices.


New York Magazine — October 2, 2014

Mark Liberman of the School of Arts & Sciences is cited for analyzing data from Penn’s World Well-Being Project.


New York Times — October 2, 2014

David Zaring of the Wharton School co-writes an article about a Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac case.


Philadelphia Inquirer — October 1, 2014

College House and Academic Services’ Marty Redman talks about students who request single rooms in college houses. Undergraduates Antoinette Radcliffe and David Glanzman comment on their experiences.


USA Today — October 1, 2014

Peter Cappelli of the Wharton School discusses online application systems and employers’ creative ways to hire and train employees.


Philadelphia Inquirer — October 1, 2014

Richard Schwab of the Perelman School of Medicine says, “Tongue size is one of the physical features that should be evaluated by a physician when screening obese patients to determine their risk for obstructive sleep apnea.”


Yahoo! Finance — October 1, 2014

Jeremy Siegel of the Wharton School is mentioned for his book Stocks for the Long Run.


Los Angeles Times — October 1, 2014

The number of sex crimes reported at some California colleges rose in 2013 from the previous year, according to figures released Wednesday by the schools. The annual disclosures are mandated under the Clery Act, which calls for colleges and universities that receive federal funding to publish statistics on campus safety. More than 50 schools are being investigated for possibly mishandling sexual violence and harassment complaints and violating the Clery Act and Title IX, a portion of a 1972 law that prohibits sexual discrimination in all education programs and activities.


Huffington Post — October 1, 2014

Dean Eric Furda of Admissions writes about similarities and applicable advice for first graders and college freshmen.


BBC News — September 30, 2014

Charles Bailey of the Perelman School of Medicine comments on how repeated courses of antibiotics are linked to childhood obesity.


“Talking Back,” Scientific American — September 30, 2014

Danielle Bassett of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is interviewed.


Diverse — September 30, 2014

Marybeth Gasman of the Graduate School of Education is cited for studying student success at minority-serving institutions such as historically black colleges and universities.


Philadelphia Inquirer — September 29, 2014

Barbie Zelizer of the Annenberg School for Communication says, “Every piece of popular culture is wrestling with changing notions about what matters, what’s right and what’s wrong.”