What's On

PERFORMANCES / LECTURES / EVENTS

January 14-28


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EDITOR'S PICKS

  • Professor of Chinese Literature Victor Mair's discovery of 3,000-year-old, blonde-haired, blue-eyed mummies in northern China is the subject of a documentary feature on PBS' "Nova" series Tuesday, Jan. 20. "China's Mysterious Mummies" airs at 8 p.m. and again at 11 p.m. on WHYY (Channel 12).

  • The University of Pennsylvania Museum welcomes in 4696, the Year of the Tiger, with children's workshops, storytelling, cooking, arts and crafts, demonstrations and the traditional Chinese Lion Dance and Firecracker Parade. Saturday, Jan. 24th, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, 33rd and Spruce streets. Admission $5, students/seniors $2.50, children under 6/Museum members/PennCard holders free.

-S.S.


Wednesday, Jan. 14

EXHIBITS

  • ART FROM PENNSYLVANIA'S "OLD MASTERS": "Pennsylvania Treasures I" exhibits works by more than 25 Pennsylvania artists, all over 65, who are still active in their craft. At the Esther Klein Art Gallery, University City Science Center, 3600 Market St. Through March 6.

Thursday, Jan. 15

FILM

  • FRENCH FILMS EXPLORE GYPSY LIFE: Two films by director Tony Gatlif, "Mondo" (1996; Philadelphia premiere) and "Latcho Drom" (1993), explore Gypsy life and history through fact, fiction and music. "Mondo" tells the story of a young Gypsy boy living on the streets of Nice (in French, with English subtitles). Gatlif has called "Latcho Drom" "a musical that tells the story of the historic odyssey of the Gypsies from India to Egypt." "Mondo" at 7 p.m.; "Latcho Drom" at 9 p.m. At the Neighborhood Film/Video Project, International House, 3700 Chestnut St. Additional screenings: "Mondo," Jan. 16-19; "Latcho Drom," Jan. 16, 18 and 20. Admission for each screening $6.50, students/seniors/International House members $5.50.

MUSIC

  • VIRGIN HOUSE BAND: The popular local jazz quartet begins its Spring series of performances at the Kelly Writers House. 8-10 p.m. at the Writers House, 3805 Locust Walk. Additional performance Jan. 22. Information for all Writers House events: 573-WRIT.

Friday, Jan. 16

SPORTS

  • SWIMMING & DIVING: Penn women's swim and dive teams meet Army. 4 p.m. in Sheerr Pool, Gimbel Gymnasium, 37th and Walnut streets. Information for all sports events: 898-4519.

Saturday, Jan. 17

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SPORTS

  • SWIMMING & DIVING: Penn women take on Brown at noon, and the men meet Brown and Army at 3 p.m. Sheerr Pool, Gimbel Gymnasium, 37th and Walnut streets.

FILM

  • A CZECH VIEW OF GYPSY LIFE: Czech director Peter Vaclav's 1996 allegorical film "Marian" is based on the harsh realities of life for Gypsy youth in Eastern Europe (in Czech with English subtitles). 2 p.m. at the Neighborhood Film/Video Project, International House, 3700 Chestnut St. Additional screenings Jan. 18-20. Admission for each screening $6.50, students/seniors/International House members $5.50.

EXHIBITS

  • GLENN LIGON: "Unbecoming" explores the artist's own identity as a gay African-American, using prints, paintings, drawings, photographs, archival materials, and installations to simultaneously explore larger questions of race, culture, gender and sexuality. At the Institute of Contemporary Art, 118 S. 36th St. Admission $3, students over 12/artists/seniors $2, ICA members/PennCard holders/children under 12/all visitors Sundays from 10 a.m. to noon free. Through March 8.

Sunday, Jan. 18

MUSIC

  • DAVID MALLET: The acclaimed singer-songwriter, whose songs have been recorded by artists ranging from Emmylou Harris to the Muppets, opens the Cherry Tree Music Co-op's 1998 winter-spring season. 7:30 p.m. at St. Mary's Parish Hall, 3916 Locust Walk. Tickets $12 in advance, $14 at the door. Info for all Cherry Tree events: 386-1640.

Monday, Jan. 19

SPORTS

  • WOMEN'S BASKETBALL: Penn vs. Lafayette. 7 p.m. at the Palestra, 33rd Street below Walnut.

Tuesday, Jan. 20

SPORTS

  • MEN'S BASKETBALL: Penn meets neighborhood rival Drexel. 7:30 p.m. at the Palestra, 33rd Street below Walnut.

LECTURE

  • GOD AND MAN AT PENN: History Professor Alan Kors reflects on the role of religion in the pursuit of truth in academic debate in his lecture "The Meek Shall Not Inherit the University." Sponsored by the Orthodox Christian Fellowship. 7:30 p.m. in the Hourglass Room, Faculty Club, 36th and Walnut streets.

Wednesday, Jan. 21

READINGS

  • POETS READ AND TALK: Ron Silliman and Jeff Dirkson read from and discuss their work with a panel of guests. 7 p.m. at the Writers House, 3805 Locust Walk.

Thursday, Jan. 22

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FILM

  • "ETHNIC NOTIONS": Marlon Riggs directed this 1987 short film about the idea of ethnicity. Presented in conjunction with the "Unbecoming" exhibit (see Saturday, Jan. 17). 6 p.m. at the Institute of Contemporary Art, 118 S. 36th St. Admission $3, students over 12/artists/seniors $2, ICA members/PennCard holders/children under 12 free. (Gallery tour precedes at 5:15.)

  • TWO FROM ANDREI KONCHALOVSKY: The Neighborhood Film/Video Project opens its series on the films of Andrei Kochalovsky with two features: "The First Teacher" (USSR, 1965; Russian with English subtitles), his first feature film, and "Runaway Train" (USA, 1985), his first American feature film. "The First Teacher" at 7 p.m.; "Runaway Train at 9:15 p.m. At International House, 3700 Chestnut St. Additional screenings: "The First Teacher," Jan. 24 and 26; "Runaway Train," Jan. 25. Admission for each screening $6.50, students/seniors/International House members $5.50.

Friday, Jan. 23

FILM

  • TWO MORE FROM KONCHALOVSKY: The Neighborhood Film/Video Project's series on the films of Andrei Kochalovsky continues with "Asya's Happiness" (USSR, 1967; Russian with English subtitles), about a single young woman who becomes pregnant on a Soviet collective farm, and "Shy People" (USA, 1987), a humorous feature about a Manhattan magazine writer who travels with her cocaine-addicted daughter in search of a story from her distant cousin. "Asya's Happiness" at 7 p.m.; "Shy People" at 9 p.m. At International House, 3700 Chestnut St. Additional screenings: "Asya's Happiness," Jan. 25 and 26; "Shy People," Jan. 24. Admission for each screening $6.50, students/seniors/International House members $5.50.

Saturday, Jan. 24

SPORTS

  • MEN'S BASKETBALL: Penn vs. St. Joseph's. 7:30 p.m. at the Palestra, 33rd Street below Walnut.

Sunday, Jan. 25

MUSIC

  • SCOTTISH FOLK MUSIC: Charlie Zahm and Ted Fiddler celebrate Robert Burns' 239th birthday with a performance of traditional Scottish music. 2:30 p.m. at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, 33rd and Spruce streets. Admission free.

  • A LITTLE FOLK, POP: Singer-songwriter Tanya Savory's work has been variously described as "the country side of folk" and "the folk side of pop with a touch of bluegrass." The Cherry Tree Music Co-op presents her along with the Chicago-based blues/swing/ethnic duo Small Potatoes. 7:30 p.m. at St. Mary's Parish Hall, 3916 Locust Walk. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 at the door.

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Current Exhibitions

  • Roman Glass: Reflections on Cultural Change. Dietrich Gallery, University of Pennsylvania Museum, 33rd and Spruce streets. Through June. Admission $5, students/seniors $2.50, children under 6/Museum members/PennCard holders/all visitors on Sundays free.


Penn celebrates the legacy of Dr. King

The University's annual observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day extends well beyond the third Monday in January, with events happening all spring. The week of MLK Day serves as the high point of Penn's commemoration, with artistic, cultural and ceremonial events each day of the week. A complete listing of MLK events is available from the African-American Resource Center at 898-0104. Here are some of the week's highlights; all events are open to the general public except where noted:

Sunday, Jan. 18

  • VIGIL AGAINST VIOLENCE: The week begins with the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Anti-Violence Vigil, organized by Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Vigil begins at 7:30 p.m. at W.E.B. DuBois College House, 3900 Walnut St.; speeches and refreshments follow at the Christian Association, 36th Street and Locust Walk.

Monday, Jan. 19

  • TOWN MEETING AND COMMEMORATION: The University's official Martin Luther King Jr. Day commemoration features keynote speaker Bev Smith, radio commentator and host of "Our Voices" on Black Entertainment Television, the winners of this year's Martin Luther King Community Service Awards, and performances by the Penn Gospel Choir and the a cappella group Ra' Na Nah. Prior to the commemoration, Smith will lead a town meeting for the West Philadelphia and Penn communities. Town meeting: 3 to 5 p.m. at DuBois College House, 3900 Walnut St.; program: 7:30 p.m. in the Annenberg School Auditorium, 3620 Walnut St.

Wednesday, Jan. 21

  • FREEDOM THEATER PERFORMANCE: Sponsored by the School of Social Work. Open to the Penn community. 12 noon in the Annenberg School Auditorium, 3620 Walnut St.

  • POETRY NIGHT AT CHATS TOO!: The Department of Academic Support Programs presents "A Blues for Martin," a celebration of Martin Luther King in poetry. Refreshments will be served. 8 to 10 p.m. at Chats Too!, Class of 1920 Commons, 3800 Locust Walk.

Thursday, Jan. 22

  • MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. INTERFAITH PROGRAM: Spelman College president emerita and Emory University professor Johnetta B. Cole delivers the keynote address, and a panel discussion examines the future of King's philosophy and movement. Sponsored by the Office of the Chaplain and the Interfaith Council. 7 p.m. at Meyerson Hall, 34th and Walnut streets.

Friday, Jan. 23

  • JAZZ FOR KING AND POETRY TOO: A cabaret featuring community relations director Glenn Bryan and his instrumental group "Signature," plus poetry readings from Kamau Ma'at and Huie Douglas. 6 p.m. at DuBois College House, 3900 Walnut St.

Originally published on January 14, 1998