Faith in the future of our inner cities


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John DiIulio

While the ideologues on the left and right were busy blaming each other for the deterioration of America's inner cities, a curious thing happened: policymakers and scholars interested in reversing the slide got religion.

This year's Steinberg Symposium at Penn explores how to restore hope to our big cities. Princeton Professor of Politics and Public Affairs John J. DiIulio, Jr. (C/G'80), whose most recent research has underscored the difference faith-based initiatives make in the lives of inner city youth, is the keynote speaker and moderator of the symposium's panel discussions.

Steinberg Symposium events, listed below, are free and open to the public. More information about the symposium is available on the Web or by calling 898-5262.

Tuesday, Nov. 17

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: 3 to 4:30 p.m. in Harrison Auditorium, University of Pennsylvania Museum, 33rd and Spruce streets. Reception in the Museum's Lower Egyptian Gallery follows panel.

KEEPING FAITH: A panel that includes Professor of Social Work Ram Cnaan and clergy from Philadelphia, Boston and Los Angeles discuss the importance of faith-based initiatives in stabilizing inner-city communities. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in Harrison Auditorium.

Wednesday, Nov. 18

ONLINE FORUM: Can't attend in person? Point your browser to the Steinberg Symposium Web site and join an online discussion with DiIulio from 2 to 3 p.m. (EST).

RETHINKING MANAGEMENT: Political Science Professor Jack Nagel, Professor of Public Policy and History Theodore Hershberg discuss public management with three innovative Philadelphia officials. 4 to 6 p.m. in Room B-1, Meyerson Hall, 210 S. 34th St..

Thursday, Nov. 19

THE POLITICAL FACTOR: History Professor Michael Katz discusses the role of political leadership with a panel of big-city mayors. 4 to 6 p.m. in Harrison Auditorium, University of Pennsylvania Museum. Reception from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Museum's Lower Egyptian Gallery precedes panel.

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Originally published on November 12, 1998