Penn Vet to offer discounts to University employees

Penn Vet benefits

Beginning Monday, Oct. 3, the School of Veterinary Medicine’s Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital will begin offering two new programs for Penn and Penn Medicine employees: a 10 percent discount on all specialty services and a drop-off service for pets.

Soon, providing your animal companions with the best possible medical attention will be not only be less expensive, but much more convenient.

Beginning Monday, Oct. 3, the School of Veterinary Medicine’s Matthew J. Ryan Veterinary Hospital will begin offering two new programs for Penn and Penn Medicine employees: a 10 percent discount on all specialty services and a drop-off service for pets.

After making an appointment, Penn employees will be able to drop off their pets—dogs, cats and avian and exotic animal companions—at the Rosenthal Imaging and Treatment Center lobby, located to the right of the Ryan Hospital entrance at 39th and Spruce streets. Faculty and staff will attend their pets’ initial examination with a veterinarian, but then may leave their animal at Ryan Hospital until 7 p.m. that same day. A valid PennCard will be required to receive the 10 percent discount.

Ryan Hospital is holding an open house on Tuesday, Sept. 27 from 3:30 to 6 p.m. during which Penn employees can tour the facilities and question hospital staff and faculty clinicians about the new initiatives. RSVPs are required, and can be submitted online or by calling 215-746-2421.

Ryan Hospital has expert clinicians that specialize in cardiology, oncology, neurology and many other fields. The hospital also contains state-of-the-art facilities, including a minimally invasive surgical suite that is set to open on Oct. 3, when the new programs take effect.

“I’m always struck by the passion, excellence and amazing clinical service that exists at Penn Vet,” says Patricia DeAngelis, executive director of the Ryan Hospital. “We want to make it affordable and extremely convenient for our colleagues at Penn to access this care.”

DeAngelis says decreasing costs for the Penn community and increasing access to the hospital’s resources are both vital parts of veterinary medicine. She says caring for pets means caring for their owners, too.

Originally published on September 22, 2011