TREASURES jewelry sale returns to Penn Museum

Treasures Penn Museum

Penn Museum

The Women’s Committee of the Penn Museum is bringing back its signature fundraiser, “TREASURES,” from Oct. 26–28.

Calling all treasure hunters! The Women’s Committee of the Penn Museum is bringing back its signature fundraiser, “TREASURES,” from Oct. 26–28, coinciding with Penn’s Homecoming Weekend. Tickets are $15 for the show or $25 for the show and admission to Museum exhibition “MAYA 2012: Lords of Time” (both tickets also include regular Museum admission).

More than two-dozen designers and jewelers from across the country will transform the Museum Rotunda and Upper Egypt galleries into a magnificent showcase for their collections of fine jewelry as well as antique, vintage, and estate jewelry for purchase.

“TREASURES,” which was held annually between 2004-2008, began as a global antiques sale and show with one-of-a-kind pieces from around the world. 

“As part of our diamond anniversary, we wanted to bring back some of our favorite events from years past and nothing could be more fitting for the Penn Museum than a curated jewelry sale,” says Marguerite Goff, co-chair of the Women’s Committee. “We have Evelyn Clothier, a well recognized, award-winning Philadelphia designer, coming. Sue Brown Antique Rings is coming. She’s been in every ‘TREASURES’ show. Some of the designers are Penn grads.”

Museum Treasures

More than two-dozen designers and jewelers from across the country will transform the Museum Rotunda and Upper Egypt galleries into a magnificent showcase for their collections.

For a list of exhibitors and a schedule of events, call 215-898-9202 or visit the Penn Museum Women’s Committee website.

The show will also feature a talk on the Penn Museum’s jewelry collection by Jane Hickman, editor of Expedition magazine and special assistant for Museum programs, on Saturday, Oct. 27, at 11 a.m.

Jewelry on display inside the Museum galleries includes Etruscan pieces, “squash blossom” Navajo necklaces, Mayan jade, Ethiopian jewelry made from silver coinage, as well as beaded jewelry associated with the Maasai.

“Visitors to the galleries will see jewelry that dates back to 2500 B.C., from the Royal Tombs of Ur,” Hickman says. “That site was excavated by the Penn Museum and the British Museum, and includes many rich burials, with gold headdresses, earrings, rings, and other forms of jewelry and precious objects.”

Originally published on September 27, 2012