Fineman & Fineman on changing media landscape

Howard Meredith Fineman

Howard Fineman, editorial director of The Huffington Post, and his daughter, Meredith, a 2009 Penn alumna and founder and CEO of Finepoint Digital PR.

The rapidly changing technological landscape has transformed the way in which news is delivered and consumed. Gone are the days when the majority of Americans turned to their morning or afternoon newspaper, breaking radio broadcast, or 6:30 p.m. nightly newscast to keep up with current events. Now the general public races to laptops, tablet computers, smartphones, and blogs for their latest news, and minute-by-minute updates on social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

On Thursday, Sept. 26, Howard Fineman, a veteran of print journalism, and his daughter, Meredith, a new media professional, will discuss “Media Then & Now” at 6 p.m. at Kelly Writers House.

Howard Fineman, an award-winning writer and a political analyst seen frequently on MSNBC’s “Hardball with Chris Matthews, spent 30 years at Newsweek magazine before joining The Huffington Post in 2010, where he is editorial director.

Meredith C. Fineman, a 2009 Penn alumna, is the founder and CEO of Finepoint Digital PR, a blogger-outreach, social media, public relations, and media relations agency in Washington, D.C. She is also a freelance writer, and has written for Gawker and The Huffington Post.

Al Filreis, the Kelly Family Professor of English and faculty director of Kelly Writers House, says journalists from the “old media” are “very hip to new media.”

“Howard moved out of Newsweek to become one of the editors of The Huffington Post,” he says. “That’s classic new journalism.”

Although Meredith Fineman is only in her mid-20s, Filreis say he believes people her age actually know more about old media than they realize because new media platforms were developed only within the past 10 years.

Filreis, who was Meredith’s academic adviser when she was a Penn undergrad, expects a lively discussion.

“You know fathers and daughters—they’ll probably enjoy the interplay,” he says.

Originally published on September 26, 2013