Readers' Best: Best treats for Halloween

As Halloween approaches, Penn staff and faculty are starting to fill the candy bowls on their desks with more than just the typical peppermints. We asked around to find out what staffers consider the best treats to give this Halloween.

Chocolate won hands down, with seven votes for goodies ranging from Kit Kats to Tootsie Rolls. But not everyone has chocolate on their minds. Here are some other choices:

MARGARET PORIGOW
Director of Operations and Technology, Undergraduate Admissions
"It has to be candy. Candy's what you give out on Halloween. It's tradition. If I were good, I'd say fruit."

MARY LUCE
Associate Professor of Marketing
"Money, because it's fungible."

FAYE PATTERSON
Records and Registration, Graduate School of Fine Arts

"Chocolate—that's most people's favorite. Unless you're a dentist. Then you should give out pencils or erasers."

TIM BOLTON
Housekeeper, Houston Hall

"Caramel apples. They taste good and they're nutritious."

SYLVIA BRAXTON
Staff, Williams Hall

"A toothbrush. You can use it to keep your teeth clean after you eat the goodies."

JOHN FURLOW
Security Officer, Annenberg School for Communication

"I lock my door and turn the light off on Halloween."

MATT MATTERN
Coordinator, Student Voices Project

"Tootsie Rolls, because they're in nice containable packages that you can buy in bulk."

PETE ARNOLD
Assistant Security Manager, The Wharton School

"Bubblegum, because that's my favorite candy."

CHRISSY WALSH
Administrative Assistant, Jewish Studies

"Last year my husband and I decided to give out something meaningful so we typed out pieces of paper saying tune in to listen to 'Adventures in Odyssey'—this great children's radio program—and stapled them to the Milky Way bars. We'll probably do something like that again this year."

SYLVIA MULLINS
Administrative Assistant, College Office

"Spiders...real spiders. I like to scare people at Halloween."

TIFFANY BARLOW
Administrative Assistant, Classical Studies

"I like the McDonald's gift certificates."

JANET SAMPSON
Instructor/Undergraduate Advisor, History Departmen
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"Ginger snap cookies."

—Carolyn O'Leary and Nicole Nordlich

Originally published on October 25, 2001