Student Spotlight: Katie Reynolds

Katie Reynolds, manager of football teamPhoto credit: Mark Stehle

TRAINING CAMP: Before she even began classes at Penn, Katie Reynolds served as a manager for the football team. She went to preseason camp with the players prior to her freshman year and has been assisting them ever since.

FREE AGENT: Reynolds attended high school at the prestigious Harvard-Westlake School in Los Angeles, and was a football team manager there, too. When she was applying for colleges, former NFL coach Dave Levy, a Harvard-Lake football coach, called around to schools she was considering to see if they were interested in putting her experience to work. Penn was one of the schools that said yes.

GRIDIRON: Reynolds, a junior and a communications major, says she enjoys the strategy involved in football. The sport, she says, “is almost like war.” “You study your opponent, spend hours figuring out how you are going to beat them, and then you go out on the field and do what you worked on,” she says.

GO DEEP: She’s also a fan of bone-crushing hits and big plays. “[Football] is a pretty high scoring game, which is fun,” she says.

DO EVERYTHING: “I do video. Occasionally I film practices,” says Reynolds of her job responsibilities. “I also do some video editing, breaking down tapes, making tapes for the coaches, DVDs for the players to watch. I also do some stats, inputting plays into our system. On game days, I take pictures that the coaches use in recruiting mailings and things like that.”

HOURS ON END: Reynolds says her managerial work does require a lot of time, “but not nearly as much time as the players and coaches have to put in.”

REYNOLDS RAP: A communications major, Reynolds says she would like to go into sports broadcasting. She interned at Comcast SportsNet over the summer and worked on “Daily News Live.”

WELL-ROUNDED: “Communications gives you such a range of knowledge on all the different ways to present media to the public,” she says. “I figured even if I’m learning it more in an academic setting than a sports setting, you can apply that and figure out what people want to watch, what they want to see.”

SPORTS REPORTER: Among broadcasters, Reynolds admires Comcast SportsNet’s Leslie Gudel. “When I worked there this summer, I got to see how she does her work, how she prepares the stories,” she says.

15-YEAR PENALTY: Los Angeles has been without a football team since 1994 and Reynolds doesn’t think one’s coming back any time soon. “The main thing is there’s nowhere to put a stadium,” she says. “Dodger Stadium is miles and miles away from the Staples Center; it’s not like Philly where they’re all right there. You’d have to find somewhere to put a stadium.”

Originally published on October 1, 2009