Seven win NSF Early Career Development Awards


Alur.jpeg Ananthasuresh.jpeg

Rajeev Alur

Suresh G. Ananthasuresh

Gans.jpeg Hitt.jpeg

Noah Gans

Photo by Todd Murray

Lorin Hitt

Kamien.jpeg Meaney.jpeg

Randall Kamien

Photo by Mark Garvin

David Meaney

Photo by Felice Macera

The National Science Foundation annually grants its Early Career Development Awards to promising young scholars demonstrating excellence in the fields of engineering and science. Penn is tied for sixth with four other institutions with seven winners. The NSF program awarded $80 million in early career development awards this year.

Rajeev Alur, associate professor of computer and information sciences, was recognized for his research in computer-aided verification of reactive systems. Suresh G. Ananthasuresh, associate professor of computer and information sciences, was recognized for his research in integrated synthesis of mechanical systems with unconventional actuations. Mark Devlin, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, was recognized for his research in measuring the spectrum of the cosmic microwave anisotropy. Noah Gans, assistant professor of operations and information management, was recognized for his research in the human factors in the management of queueing systems. Lorin Hitt, assistant professor of operations and information management, was recognized for his research in the theory development and empirical analysis in the economics of information technology. Randall Kamien, assistant professor of physics and astronomy, was recognized for his research in chiral molecules, structures and materials. David Meaney, assistant professor of bioengineering, was recognized for his research in career applications in bioengineering research and education. Front page for this issue | Pennsylvania Current home page

Originally published on March 18, 1999