University Communications Staff

Evan Lerner

Science News Officer

Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Computing, Engineering, Institute for Strategic Threat Analysis and Response, Mathematics, Penn Science Café, Physics, Psychology, Science, Technology, Weiss Tech House

215-573-6604

elerner@upenn.edu

At the forefront of a field known as “neurocriminology,” Adrian Raine, a Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor with appointments in the School of Arts & Sciences and the Perelman School of Medicine, has long studied the interplay between biology and the environment when it comes to antisocial and criminal behavior.
Technological limitations have made studying friction on the atomic scale difficult, but researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California, Merced, have now made advances in that quest on two fronts.
By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone        (This is the fifth and last in a series of features introducing the inaugural Penn President’s Engagement Prize winners.)  
Every year, Penn produces a large volume of new research, but it also produces a high number of researchers. The process of becoming a scientist is more than just learning formulas and memorizing equations; it involves experiencing life in the lab and the drive for new knowledge.      For juniors Samuel Allon and Iulia Tapescu, that process started long before they first stepped foot on campus, and it is already paying dividends.
Beauty, it has been said, is in the eye of the beholder. People’s opinions on what constitutes an attractive face changes over time and from place to place. A new study by researchers at Penn’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience gives a clearer view of just what drives such shifts: People actually begin to see faces differently depending on the context.
Beauty, it has been said, is in the eye of the beholder. People’s opinions on what constitutes an attractive face changes over time and from place to place. A new study by researchers at Penn’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience gives a clearer view of just what drives such shifts: People actually begin to see faces differently depending on the context.
Beauty, it has been said, is in the eye of the beholder. People’s opinions on what constitutes an attractive face changes over time and from place to place. A new study by researchers at Penn’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience gives a clearer view of just what drives such shifts: People actually begin to see faces differently depending on the context.
Members of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) have released the first in a series of maps that show the concentration of dark matter in the cosmos. Analysis of the distribution of the dark matter in the maps will improve the understanding of how and where galaxies form, as well as help scientists to probe the nature of dark energy, the mysterious force believed to be causing the accelerating expansion of the universe.
Members of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) have released the first in a series of maps that show the concentration of dark matter in the cosmos. Analysis of the distribution of the dark matter in the maps will improve the understanding of how and where galaxies form, as well as help scientists to probe the nature of dark energy, the mysterious force believed to be causing the accelerating expansion of the universe.
Adolescence is a time of frequent and intense emotional experiences, but some youth handle their emotions better than others. Why do some young people react adaptively while others ruminate?