University Communications Staff

Evan Lerner

Science News Officer

Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Computing, Engineering, Institute for Strategic Threat Analysis and Response, Mathematics, Penn Science Café, Physics, Psychology, Science, Technology, Weiss Tech House

215-573-6604

elerner@upenn.edu

By Madeleine Stone @themadstone
One of the biggest mysteries in modern science is the speed at which the universe is expanding. Galaxies that have been moving apart since the Big Bang billions of years ago should be slowing down due to gravity, but instead, they are accelerating. The search for so-called “dark energy” is one part of the potential explanation for this phenomenon, but while hidden forces may be at play, human understanding of gravity itself may be incomplete at these cosmological scales.
The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction a person is facing as he or she moves about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Penn psychologists have now shown a neurological basis for something that researchers have long observed about navigational behavior: People use geometrical relationships to orient themselves.
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation announced Wednesday that Alison Sweeney, an assistant professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania, will receive a 2014 Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering.
The brain has a complex system for keeping track of which direction you are facing as you move about; remembering how to get from one place to another would otherwise be impossible. Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have now shown how the brain anchors this mental compass.
Martin Seligman, the director of the Positive Psychology Center and the Zellerbach Family Professor of Psychology in the University of Pennsylvania's School of Arts & Sciences, will be honored with the inaugural
On Wednesday, Oct. 22, Penn’s Nano/Bio Interface Center (NBIC) will host its annual NanoDay@Penn, a public education and outreach event that will feature a series of talks, demonstrations, and exhibits concerning nanotechnology, a rapidly expanding scientific discipline that involves the manipulation of matter on the atomic and molecular scale.
On Wednesday, Oct. 22, Penn’s Nano/Bio Interface Center (NBIC) will host its annual NanoDay@Penn, a public education and outreach event that will feature a series of talks, demonstrations, and exhibits concerning nanotechnology, a rapidly expanding scientific discipline that involves the manipulation of matter on the atomic and molecular scale.
Millions of Twitter feeds open a window into the psychology of a community; through that data, researchers can measure the risk for heart disease with surprising accuracy. Social media provides a view into the collective mind, revealing the connection between shared psychological states and public health and illness.
By Madeleine Stone @themadstone