University Communications Staff

Evan Lerner

Science News Officer

Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Computing, Engineering, Institute for Strategic Threat Analysis and Response, Mathematics, Penn Science Café, Physics, Psychology, Science, Technology, Weiss Tech House

215-573-6604

elerner@upenn.edu

For small children, being hospitalized is an especially frightening experience above and beyond the challenges of whatever they are being treated for. They are often connected to a variety of unpleasant tubes and monitors, which they may instinctively try to remove.    
Graphene, a one-atom thick lattice of carbon atoms, is often touted as a revolutionary material that will take the place of silicon at the heart of electronics. The unmatched speed at which it can move electrons, plus its essentially two-dimensional form factor, make it an attractive alternative, but several hurdles to its adoption remain.
The University of Pennsylvania Y-Prize Competition has announced the four finalists who will battle for $5,000 and rights to commercialize their application of Penn nanotechnology at the third annual Y-Prize Grand Finale.
Adrian Raine is a pioneer in the field of neurocriminology, aiming to unearth the biological roots of criminal behavior.       A new study from his group is developing the basis for a new branch of this field: social neurocriminology, which seeks to better understand the societal origins of these biological factors.
Adrian Raine is a pioneer in the field of neurocriminology, aiming to unearth the biological roots of criminal behavior.       A new study from his group is developing the basis for a new branch of this field: social neurocriminology, which seeks to better understand the societal origins of these biological factors.
Twitter has broken news stories, launched and ended careers, started social movements and toppled governments, all by being an easy, direct and immediate way for people to share what’s on their minds.
To survive and fulfill their biological functions, cells need to take in material from their environment. In this process, proteins within the cell pull inward on its membrane, forming a pit that eventually encapsulates the material in a bubble called a vesicle.
Biosensors—electronic devices that can detect the presence of proteins and other biological molecules—have a wide variety of applications, from medical diagnostics and food safety, to security and law enforcement. But current biosensors need to be custom-built to detect a specific target.
One of nanotechnology’s greatest promises is interacting with the biological world the way our own cells do, but current biosensors must be tailor-made to detect the presence of one type of protein, the identity of which must be known in advance.