University Communications Staff

Greg Johnson

Managing Editor

215-898-3632

gregj@upenn.edu

When Dorothy Roberts was 3 months old, she moved with her parents from Chicago to Liberia, where her mother, Iris, had worked as a young woman after leaving Jamaica. It was the first of Dorothy’s many trips abroad, and one during which her father, Robert, took a bunch of photographs and filmed home movies with his 16-millimeter camera. The Roberts family moved back to Chicago when Dorothy was 2, and she can recall weekly screenings of the 16-milimeter reels from Liberia in the living room.
DREAM TEAM: Alex T. Williams, from Arlington, Texas, is a third-year Ph.D. student in the Annenberg School for Communication.
The dehumanizing system of racial segregation that flourished in the American South from the end of Reconstruction through the 1970s has a friend in the former caste system in India. Both were callous, heartless, and cruel, and marginalized an oppressed people.
Syria’s Great Mosque of Aleppo, or Umayyad Mosque, was built in the eighth century in the Ancient City of Aleppo, one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. Sacked by fire, conquerors, and earthquakes, the Great Mosque was rebuilt several times, and is believed by some Muslims to contain the remains of the Prophet Zakariya, father of the Prophet Yahya, whom Christians call John the Baptist.
A dash of Picasso, a dose of William Blake, a formative boyhood in the Bronx, and a never-ending imagination stirred with artistic vigor formed William Steig, one of the 20th century’s most acclaimed cartoonists and children’s book authors.
The Philadelphia Eagles called Penn’s Franklin Field home for 13 seasons from 1958-70, after moving from the former Connie Mack Stadium at 24th and Lehigh. Their first win at Franklin Field was a 27-24 defeat of the New York Giants on Oct. 5, 1958. In the second quarter, Hall of Fame quarterback Norm Van Brocklin connected with Hall of Fame wide receiver Tommy McDonald for a 91-yard score.
It’s noisy out there—with alarms rousing and TVs blaring, cars honking and SEPTA trains roaring, dogs barking and jackhammers destroying, motorcycles gunning and airplanes soaring, sirens sounding and strangers shouting, it can all be astounding. Give your ears a break. Too much noise is bad for your health. The ears do not sleep. Like watchmen (or watchwomen), they are on high alert, 24/7, eavesdropping on surroundings, searching for any sound signaling danger. One of their tormentors is noise, which can panic the body like stress.
In their November letter to the Models of Excellence Committee nominating their manager, Silvana Burgese, for the Model Supervisor Award, members of the Faculty Support S
In the mid-1970s, Arthur E. Humphrey, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), posed a very basic question to the SEAS Board of Overseers: What should be the future of a modest-size engineering school on an Ivy League liberal arts campus?