University Communications Staff

Heather A. Davis

Manager, Internal Communications

215-898-1426

hdavis2@upenn.edu

Writing a dissertation may be a marathon rather than a sprint—but that doesn’t mean the process of sitting down to write needs to be the equivalent of a solitary run. In the Women Who Write group, the process is more like a cross-country team experience, explains Andrea Kauffman-Berry, a Ph.D. student studying sociology in the School of Arts & Sciences, with members supporting one another throughout the lengthy writing and rewriting process.
In her career, Ana-Rita Mayol has worked to get students from middle through graduate school excited about science. She’s developed science education programs and mentorships, as well as programs to train teachers so they’re better equipped to inspire a new generation of scientists and engineers.
Every two weeks, high school students don hard hats for a construction site tour, pour over blueprints to a building, or fashion an architectural model out of gumdrops and uncooked spaghetti. These students are learning about the nuts and bolts of design and construction through the ACE Mentor Program, which stands for Architecture, Construction, and Engineering. In the nationally run program, which reaches more than 8,000 students annually, students are grouped into small teams and are mentored by industry experts.
CIVICS 101: There’s a problem with what people know about government and civics—and that problem is that people know surprisingly little.
Jim Thorpe is remembered as one of the 20th century’s greatest athletes. He was an Olympic gold medalist for the pentathlon and decathlon in 1912 and played professional American football, baseball, and basketball. What’s less well-known is the controversial story behind how a town in northeastern Pennsylvania came to bear Thorpe’s name. Upon Thorpe’s death in 1953, the remains of the Native American athlete, an enrolled member of the Sac and Fox Nation, were moved from the tribe’s location in Oklahoma to Pennsylvania.
Jim Thorpe is remembered as one of the 20th century’s greatest athletes. He was an Olympic gold medalist for the pentathlon and decathlon in 1912 and played professional American football, baseball, and basketball. What’s less well-known is the controversial story behind how a town in northeastern Pennsylvania came to bear Thorpe’s name. Upon Thorpe’s death in 1953, the remains of the Native American athlete, an enrolled member of the Sac and Fox Nation, were moved from the tribe’s location in Oklahoma to Pennsylvania.
Twitter has helped to launch or torpedo careers, bring cute animal pictures to millions, and document social movements from the ground up. Now, the social media site can be considered an accurate predictor of rates of atherosclerotic heart disease in communities across the United States.
[youtube]http://youtu.be/8dUYVvIdhCY[/youtube] EARLY START: Erica Ball was just 3 years old when she begged her parents to let her play the piano. Ball doesn’t remember exactly what sparked her interest, but she says her fluency grew quickly as she progressed from playing on a tiny keyboard to a baby grand by middle school. Ball, now a fourth-year graduate student in composition in the Department of Music, also plays the violin. “I learned to read music probably a few months before I learned to read words,” she says.
EARLY ELECTION DAYS: In elementary school, College senior Joyce Kim got her first taste of running for student government when she was elected historian.