University Communications Staff

Heather A. Davis

Manager, Internal Communications

215-898-1426

hdavis2@upenn.edu

For more than two decades, Penn has had a strategic and systematic approach to economic inclusion. In that time, the University has worked to expand economic opportunities for minorities and women in the areas of purchasing, human resources, and construction by setting annual goals for engaging local, minority, and women-owned businesses and workforce participation.
For more than two decades, Penn has had a strategic and systematic approach to economic inclusion. In that time, the University has worked to expand economic opportunities for minorities and women in the areas of purchasing, human resources, and construction by setting annual goals for engaging local, minority, and women-owned businesses and workforce participation.
Two-and-a-half decades ago, Michaela Majoun accepted a DJ job at the fledgling WXPN 88.5 radio station.
This summer, Penn will begin rolling out additional initiatives that aim to foster a healthier campus through reduced tobacco use. 
First there were working dogs and flying robots. Now, Penn hopes to draw a new generation of innovators and entrepreneurs to a 23-acre parcel of land along the southern bank of the Schuylkill River.
First there were working dogs and flying robots. Now, Penn hopes to draw a new generation of innovators and entrepreneurs to a 23-acre parcel of land along the southern bank of the Schuylkill River.
Eugene Janda’s office in the Division of Public Safety building on Chestnut Street is full of memorabilia from a career dedicated to fire safety.
Eugene Janda’s office in the Division of Public Safety building on Chestnut Street is full of memorabilia from a career dedicated to fire safety.
A monument can take many forms to honor or commemorate a significant person, place, or event. Next month, a public art and urban research project in the Center Courtyard of City Hall will ask people to think about an appropriate monument for Philadelphia at this moment in time, and what form a 21st century urban monument might take.
On a particularly rain-soaked spring afternoon at the Community Farm and Resource Center at Bartram’s Garden, located in Southwest Philadelphia, curly kale seedlings are going into the ground.