University Communications Staff

Katherine Unger Baillie

Science News Officer

Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology, Dental Medicine, Earth and Environmental Science, History and Sociology of Science, Penn Museum, Penn Science Café, Science, Technology, Veterinary Medicine

215-898-9194

kbaillie@upenn.edu

WHO:             Ben Chrisinger, city and regional planning, School of Design Johannes Eichstaedt, psychology, School of Arts & Sciences
Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism.
Take a look at the inside of your elbow. Chances are, you can see a vein—one of the body’s large vessels that routes blood around the body.
Robert Aronowitz, a physician and historian at the University of Pennsylvania, has been elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine, one of the nation's highest honors in the health-care field.
Pulmonary hypertension is a devastating disease that occurs when the arteries feeding the lungs narrow, making the right side of the heart work harder to pump blood to the lungs. Over time, the heart weakens, leading to heart failure. The disease can affect the young as well as the old. There is no cure, and the most successful treatments currently available cost tens of thousands of dollars, putting them out of reach to significant numbers of patients. Research by Penn scientists, however, aims to change that.
By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone
Almost anyone who has spent time in a hospital is familiar with the routine checks of blood pressure and oxygen levels that serve as signposts of a patient’s overall health. But these measures only reflect the pulsing of blood through the large vessels, arteries and veins, not the smaller arterioles, venules and capillaries, which directly feed tissues and cells.
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Florida have identified a drug that can be used to treat pulmonary hypertension, a disease for which few therapy options exist.
For many dog owners, incessant barking is the bane of their existence. Some resort to using “shock collars” that deliver a jolt when their animal barks. The brainchild of a School of Veterinary Medicine student, however, may one day help pet lovers quiet their pets using positive reinforcement in the form of food rewards.
For many dog owners, incessant barking is the bane of their existence. Some resort to using “shock collars” that deliver a jolt when their animal barks. The brainchild of a School of Veterinary Medicine student, however, may one day help pet lovers quiet their pets using positive reinforcement in the form of food rewards.