University Communications Staff

Katherine Unger Baillie

Science News Officer

Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology, Dental Medicine, Earth and Environmental Science, History and Sociology of Science, Penn Museum, Penn Science Café, Science, Technology, Veterinary Medicine

215-898-9194

kbaillie@upenn.edu

Nanotechnology may sound futuristic, but it has already found its way into household products, from cosmetics to cleaning solutions. And with a little help from a School of Dental Medicine scientist, consumers may one day even find nanoparticles in a tube of toothpaste.
Nanotechnology may sound futuristic, but it has already found its way into household products, from cosmetics to cleaning solutions. And with a little help from a School of Dental Medicine scientist, consumers may one day even find nanoparticles in a tube of toothpaste.
By Sarah Welsh
[Editor’s note: This story is part of a series celebrating National Public Health Week by featuring stories that highlight public health efforts across the University. Follow along at‪ #‎PennOneHealth.]
[Editor’s note: This story is part of a series celebrating National Public Health Week by featuring stories that highlight public health efforts across the University. Follow along at‪ #‎PennOneHealth.]
Penn's health schools are celebrating National Public Health Week by featuring stories that highlight public health efforts across the University. Follow along on Twitter at ‪#‎PennOneHealth‬.***
(This is the first in a series of features introducing the inaugural Penn President's Engagement Prize winners.)   As a young student growing up in Tarkwa Breman, a rural village in Ghana, Shadrack Frimpong was surrounded by many bright peers, both male and female. But as the years passed, many of the female students stopped coming to school. 
Therapeutic agents intended to reduce dental plaque and prevent tooth decay are often removed by saliva and the act of swallowing before they can take effect. But a team of researchers has developed a way to keep the drugs from being washed away.
Study after study shows that eating fish has a plethora of beneficial health effects, but many fish populations are in danger of dwindling to nothing, and fresh fish can be difficult to find in certain areas, particularly in inner cities.
Animal shelters are often pressed for resources as they work to find homes for as many pets as possible. That means when a shelter animal has a medical problem that requires specialty care, the facility might not have the time, money, or staff to address that need—putting the animal’s life in danger.