University Communications Staff

Katherine Unger Baillie

Science News Officer

Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology, Dental Medicine, Earth and Environmental Science, History and Sociology of Science, Penn Museum, Penn Science Café, Science, Technology, Veterinary Medicine

215-898-9194

kbaillie@upenn.edu

Last year, University of Pennsylvania researchers Alexander J. Stewart and Joshua B.
At Penn, crossing disciplines is a celebrated endeavor. Indeed, President Amy Gutmann’s Penn Compact 2020 underscores the importance of integrating knowledge as a means toward achieving innovation and discovery.
In some of Penn’s dining halls, the food is all-you-can-eat. It’s almost too easy for diners to have eyes bigger than their stomachs, piling on any dish that looks appealing, then tossing the leftovers away at the end of their meal.
Sleep is a critical period for memory consolidation, and most people don’t get enough. Research has shown that even brief periods of sleep deprivation can lead to deficits in memory formation.
George Hajishengallis, a professor of microbiology in the School of Dental Medicine, spends most of his professional energy on research that concerns the mouth; specifically, he studies a severe form of gum disease called periodontitis. But, as he notes, “the mouth is not an isolated entity.” 
George Hajishengallis, a professor of microbiology in the School of Dental Medicine, spends most of his professional energy on research that concerns the mouth; specifically, he studies a severe form of gum disease called periodontitis. But, as he notes, “the mouth is not an isolated entity.” 
In multiple sclerosis, the immune system goes rogue, improperly attacking the body’s own central nervous system. Mobility problems and cognitive impairments may arise as the nerve cells become damaged.
By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone
In 1793, people walking around what is now known as Old City in downtown Philadelphia may have been subject to an unpleasant odor permeating the air. A shipment of coffee beans had been dumped on Water Street between Arch and Race streets, along the Delaware River, and left to rot. The stench was apparently so great that Benjamin Rush—a Founding Father, well-known physician, and professor of medicine at Penn at the time—believed it was to blame for a devastating epidemic of yellow fever that struck the city that year.
In 1793, people walking around what is now known as Old City in downtown Philadelphia may have been subject to an unpleasant odor permeating the air. A shipment of coffee beans had been dumped on Water Street between Arch and Race streets, along the Delaware River, and left to rot.