University Communications Staff

Katherine Unger Baillie

Science News Officer

Anthropology, Archaeology, Biology, Dental Medicine, Earth and Environmental Science, History and Sociology of Science, Penn Museum, Penn Science Café, Science, Technology, Veterinary Medicine

215-898-9194

kbaillie@upenn.edu

By Sarah Welsh
In Philadelphia, winter has just begun unleashing its snowy might. Yet it’s right around this time of year that many parents and children begin thinking about warmer days ahead. Summer camp enrollment has commenced, and Penn offers dozens of choices for school-age children to enrich their summers through art, business, science, athletics, and many other creative and academic endeavors.
Joshua Plotkin of the University of Pennsylvania has been named winner of the 2015 Akira Okubo Prize, awarded jointly by the International Society for Mathematical Biology and the
One of the most troubling complications of diabetes is its effect on wound healing. Roughly 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from a non-healing wound in their lifetime. In some cases, these open ulcers on the skin lead to amputations.
It may seem obvious, but before a mosquito passes along a disease like malaria to a human, it must become infected by a parasite, too. And just like a person, a mosquito has an immune system that works hard to fight off infection so it doesn't get sick.
It may seem obvious, but before a mosquito passes along a disease like malaria to a human, it must become infected by a parasite, too. And just like a person, a mosquito has an immune system that works hard to fight off infection so it doesn't get sick.
It may seem obvious, but before a mosquito passes along a disease like malaria to a human, it must become infected by a parasite, too. And just like a person, a mosquito has an immune system that works hard to fight off infection so it doesn't get sick.
Every year, more than 1 million Americans have surgery to replace a joint, such as a hip or knee. One of the biggest risks of these procedures is infection.
One of the keys to Songtao Shi’s productive career in research came from a seemingly humble item: his daughter’s first baby tooth.
“In today’s world, the stereotype of the nerdy scientist, by himself, looking at a microscope, is no longer accurate and no longer useful,” says Gabriel Innes, a third-year student in the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.