Penn Study: Black Cardiac Arrest Patients More Apt to Be Admitted to Hospitals With Lowest Survival Rates

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Media Contact:Holly Auer | holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5659 April 29, 2011

PHILADELPHIA – Black cardiac arrest victims are more likely to die when they’re treated in hospitals that care for a large black population than when they’re brought to hospitals with a greater proportion of white patients, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. The study is published in the April issue of the American Heart Journal.

The Penn team found that, among 68,115 cardiac arrest admissions analyzed through Medicare records, only 31 percent of black patients treated in hospitals that care for a higher proportion of black patients survived to be discharged from the hospital, compared to 46 of those cared for in predominantly white hospitals. Results showed that even white patients were less likely to survive when treated at these hospitals which provide care for higher proportions of black patients.

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