Jumping Genes Provide Extensive “Raw Material” for Evolution, Penn Study Finds

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658June 1, 2010

PHILADELPHIA - Using high-throughput sequencing to map the locations of a common type of jumping gene within a person’s entire genome, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found extensive variation in these locations among the individuals they studied, further underscoring the role of these errant genes in maintaining genetic diversity.

The investigators determined that any two peoples’ genomes differ at roughly 285 sites out of the 1139 sites studied. These results were found by scanning the genomes of 25 individuals, 15 of which were unrelated. They report their findings online in Genome Research.

Click here to view the full release on the the Penn Medicine News site.

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