Pennsylvania Muscle Institute Symposium Presents "Structure and Signaling in Normal and Diseased Muscle"

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604October 27, 2008


WHO:

The Pennsylvania Muscle Institute is an interdisciplinary group of research investigators in biophysics, biochemistry, genetics and physiology working to discover the mechanisms of muscle function, muscle disease and motile biological systems and to apply these discoveries to new therapies and develop technologies for the study of muscle and motile systems.

WHAT:

The annual symposium and retreat invites researchers from to discuss prominent technological and methodological developments in advanced light microscopy, structural spectroscopy, nanotechnology, biochemical kinetics, image processing, molecular biology and viral gene targeting.

WHERE:

Biomedical Research Building II/III Auditorium
University of Pennsylvania

WHEN: Nov. 3, 2008

SCHEDULE:

9 a.m. Welcome
Yale E. Goldman, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

9:05 to 9:50 a.m. Muscle Cell Membrane Integrity and the Pathogenesis of Muscular Dystrophy
Kevin Campbell, University of Iowa

9:50 to 10:35 a.m. Calcium Pumps, Pump Regulatory Proteins and Cardiomyopathy
David MacLennan, University of Toronto

11 to 11:45 a.m Ryanodine Receptor and Cardiac Hypertrophy
Gerhard Meissner, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

11:45 a.m. to noon Clues to the Formation of Cores in a Mouse Model of Malignant Hyperthermia
Simona Boncompagni, G.d'Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy, and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

2 to 2:45 p.m. Calcium Signaling in Skeletal Muscle During E-C Coupling
Stephen M. Baylor, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

2:45 to 3:30 p.m. Slow L-Type Calcium Current in Skeletal Muscle: Is it Physiologically Irrelevant?
Kurt Beam, University of Colorado School of Medicine

3:30 to 4:15 p.m. Excitation-Thermogenic and E-C Coupling in Muscle: A Fish Tale from Sword-Fish, Toadfish and Tuna
Barbara Block, Stanford University

4:15 to 4:30 p.m. Role of Hypoxia in Muscle Dysfunction
Gabriel Willmann, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

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