Penn in the News

Boston Globe — May 8, 2005
President Amy Gutmann warns that middle-class students are almost as under-represented as the poor on elite campuses, and she argues for improving public schools to broaden the admissions pool.
Washington Post — May 6, 2005
Stephen Burbank, the National Football League's special master and law professor, was on deck to handle the dispute between Terrell Owens and the Baltimore Ravens, but both parties agreed to a settlement prior to the hearing.
New York Times — May 5, 2005
Arthur Caplan, director of the Center for Bioethics, says sponsors need to be present when children are involved in AIDS drug trials.
Chicago Sun-Times — May 5, 2005
Edwin Baker, professor of law, says it can be difficult to prove an error in a news story was intentional.
USA Today — May 4, 2005
Lee Stetson, dean of admissions, points out that wait-listed applicants at highly selective institutions are not less well qualified but are victims of space limitations.
New York Times — May 4, 2005
Joseph Turow, professor of communications, comments on the "ritual" involved in public, televised confessions such as that of Pat O'Brien about his alcoholism.
Chicago Tribune — May 3, 2005
Legacy applicants can provide "a bond that reaches across generations," says Lee Stetson, dean of admissions.
Inside Higher Ed — May 2, 2005
President Amy Gutmann argues for increased representation at elite institutions of students from the middle class.
Ebony Magazine — May 1, 2005
Joann Mitchell is profiled in her job as vice president and chief of staff in the Office of the President.
Washington Post — May 1, 2005
Kathryn Edin, associate professor of sociology, writes about her extensive research on the rise in unmarried childbearing.
Philadelphia inquirer — April 26, 2005
President Amy Gutman names Ronald Daniels, dean of the University of Toronto's Faculty of Law to be the 28th provost at Penn.
New York Times — April 26, 2005
Peter Quinn, chair of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery, says wisdom teeth can cause severe problems, but each patient must be carefully evaluated to see if extracting the teeth is the route to go.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette — April 26, 2005
Gary Bernstein, associate professor of physics and astronomy, comments on the idea that the galaxy is so massive it can magnify light and make objects appear larger than their actual size.
Philadelphia Inquirer — April 25, 2005
Dawn Bonnel, professor of materials science and engineering, is developing her idea to build gadgets in the future from the smallest items, such as atoms and molecules.
Christian Science Monitor — April 25, 2005
Susan Wachter, professor of real estate and finance, says people are vulnerable to the unstable price increases of the real estate market.
Philadelphia Inquirer — April 22, 2005
Kathryn Jedrziewski, director of the Institute for Aging, says employees have seen the effects of downsizing and feel they must watch out for themselves.
Inside Higher Ed — April 22, 2005
Dennis DeTurck, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, says the purpose of the new cirriculum is to expose students to a wide variety of subject areas.
Philadelphia Inquirer — April 21, 2005
David Stern, director of the Jewish Studies Program, says younger generations of Jews are adding a touch of American culture to their traditional holiday meals.
Chronicle of Higher Education — April 21, 2005
Harvey Rubin, director of the Institute for Strategic Threat Analysis and Response, explains how data gathered from monitoring threats to cybersecurity will be used to help protect computer systems from attack.
Chronicle of Higher Education — April 20, 2005
President Amy Gutmann suggests that universities be sure that rigorous introductory courses for science and mathmatics are useful.

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