School of Engineering & Applied Science

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 29, 2011

Two Penn Engineers to Attend Annual Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

PHILADELPHIA -– Two faculty members from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Engineering and Applied Science will be participating in the 17th annual Frontiers of Engineering Symposium in September. The exclusive meeting is held by the National Academy of Engineering and will take place at Google Headquarters in Mountain View, Calif.

Lighten Up: Polaritons with Turntable Photon-Excito Coherence

June 14, 2011

Ritesh Agarwal of the School of Engineering and Applied Science is cited for his research.

Article Source: Physorg.com
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 14, 2011

Penn Researchers Break Light-Matter Coupling Strength Limit in Nanoscale Semiconductors

PHILADELPHIA—New engineering research at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrates that polaritons have increased coupling strength when confined to nanoscale semiconductors. This represents a promising advance in the field of photonics: smaller and faster circuits that use light rather than electricity.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 9, 2011

Penn Engineers: Two-Dimensional Graphene Metamaterials and One-Atom-Thick Optical Devices

PHILADELPHIA -- Two University of Pennsylvania engineers have proposed the possibility of two-dimensional metamaterials. These one-atom-thick metamaterials could be achieved by controlling the conductivity of sheets of graphene, which is a single layer of carbon atoms.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 7, 2011

Penn Offering Postdoctoral Fellowships to Promote Academic Diversity

PHILADELPHIA — The University of Pennsylvania is accepting applications for its Academic Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship Program.

Audio: Cyberwarfare and Cybersecurity

June 7, 2011

Matt Blaze of the School of Engineering and Applied Science discusses cyber threats and cyberwarfare from foreign nations.

Article Source: WHYY Radio (Philadelphia)
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 6, 2011

Penn Researchers Develop Biological Circuit Components, New Microscope Technique for Measuring Them

PHILADELPHIA — Electrical engineers have long been toying with the idea of designing biological molecules that can be directly integrated into electronic circuits. University of Pennsylvania researchers have developed a way to form these structures so they can operate in open-air environments, and, more important, have developed a new microscope technique that can measure the electrical properties of these and similar devices.

Penn Students Help Robot Grasp the Art of Reading

May 31, 2011

Computer and Information Science's Kostas Daniilidis and the GRASP laboratory are featured for their work on a robot called Graspy.

Article Source: "Newsworks," WHYY Radio
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Media Contact:Jacquie Posey | jposey@upenn.edu | 215-898-6460
Media Contact:Laura Cavender | cavender@upenn.edu | 202-415-9881May 23, 2011

University of Pennsylvania Announces MOU With Seoul National University

SEOUL, KOREA –- In a ceremony today at Seoul National University (SNU), the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) and SNU announced an agreement recognizing shared academic interests between the two universities. The memorandum of understanding builds on school and program partnerships already in place, and will allow the universities to explore further collaborative research projects and other academic activities.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604May 17, 2011

Penn Research Answers Long-Standing Question About Swimming in Elastic Liquids

PHILADELPHIA — A biomechanical experiment conducted at the University of Pennsylvania School of Engineering and Applied Science has answered a long-standing theoretical question: Will microorganisms swim faster or slower in elastic fluids? For a prevalent type of swimming, undulation, the answer is “slower.”