Perelman School of Medicine

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660July 28, 2014

Penn Medicine: Competition Seeks Experts in Science and Machine Learning to Predict and Detect Seizures

Epilepsy affects more than 50 million people worldwide. The disorder is caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain that can bring about seizures, changes in awareness or sensation and behavior.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604July 30, 2014

Penn Physics/Medicine Receives $2.8 Million Grant for Stroke Research

The National Institutes of Health have awarded University of Pennsylvania researchers a five-year, $2.8 million grant to further research on techniques for monitoring blood flow in the brain following strokes.

Research Examines Infection and a Method of Circumcision

July 30, 2014

Brian Leas and Craig Umscheid of the Perelman School of Medicine are highlighted for researching the spread of infection through the use of “direct oral suction” used during a type of circumcision.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

OKCupid, Say It Ain’t So!

July 29, 2014

Jonathan Moreno of the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts & Sciences discusses how social networks can undermine trust.

Article Source: Psychology Today
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194July 29, 2014

Penn Team Makes Cancer Glow to Improve Surgical Outcomes

blurb: 
The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence. With a new technique, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have established a new strategy to help surgeons see the entire tumor in the patient, increasing the likelihood of a positive outcome.

The best way to cure most cases of cancer is to surgically remove the tumor. The Achilles heel of this approach, however, is that the surgeon may fail to extract the entire tumor, leading to a local recurrence.

Audio: Studying How the Brain Gets Meaning From Sound

July 24, 2014

Maria Geffen of the Perelman School of Medicine talks about her interest in how the brain assigns meaning to sound.

Homelessness Is on the Rise in Kensington

July 28, 2014

Philippe Bourgois of the School of Arts & Sciences and the Perelman School of Medicine comments on young people using injectable heroin.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

Science Is Changing What It Means to Be Dead

July 27, 2014

Lance Becker of the Perelman School of Medicine talks about the possibility of long-term cryogenic preservation.

Article Source: New Republic
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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658July 24, 2014

Atomic Structure of Key Muscle Component Revealed in Penn Study

Actin is the most abundant protein in the body, and when you look more closely at its fundamental role in life, it’s easy to see why. It is the basis of most movement in the body, and all cells and components within them have the capacity to move: muscle contracting, heart beating, blood clotting, and nerve cells communicating, among many other functions.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653July 24, 2014

Link Between Ritual Circumcision Procedure and Herpes Infection in Infants Examined by Penn Medicine Analysis

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of  herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn