Perelman School of Medicine

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Kim Menard | kim.menard@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-662-6183 April 6, 2011

Opioids Now Most Prescribed Class of Medications, Penn Researcher Finds

Two reports by addiction researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the National Institute on Drug Abuse show a drastic shift in prescribing patterns impacting the magnitude of opioid substance abuse in America. The reports, published in JAMA, recommend a comprehensive effort to reduce public health risks while improving patient care, including better training for prescribers, pain management treatment assessment, personal responsibility and public education.

Video: Scientists Discover New Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Genes

April 2, 2011

Gerard Schellenberg of the School of Medicine comments on his study of Alzheimer’s.

Article Source: ABC News
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Holly Auer | holly.auer@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5659April 5, 2011

Targeted Drug Plus Malaria Pill Serve a 1-2 Punch in Cancer Patients, Penn Study Shows

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine may have found a way to turn an adaptive cellular response into a liability for cancer cells. When normal cells are starved for food, they chew up existing proteins and membranes to stay alive. Cancer cells have corrupted that process, called autophagy, using it to survive when they run out of nutrients and to evade death after damage from chemotherapy and other sources.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Jessica Mikulski | jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369April 5, 2011

Penn Study Sheds Light on End of Life Management of Implanted Defibrillators

Each year, more than 100,000 patients in the U.S. undergo implantation of a new implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) for heart rhythm abnormalities. This number constitutes a 20-fold increase over the last 15 years. Current medical guidelines advocate discussion of end of life care of these medical devices, including deactivation, but many patients may not understand their options.

Picking on the Poor, Obese No Way to Balance Arizona’s Budget

April 1, 2011

Arthur Caplan of the School of Medicine contributes his perspective on Arizona’s strategies to balance its budget.

Article Source: MSNBC

Blood Pressure. Cholesterol. Guilt?

April 4, 2011

James Kirkpatrick of School of Medicine comments on using guilt to motivate patients to choose healthy options.

Article Source: WHYY Radio “Newsworks”

Vast Gene Study Yields Insights on Alzheimer’s

April 3, 2011

Gerard Schellenberg of the School of Medicine comments on his study of Alzheimer’s.

Article Source: New York Times
facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Jessica Mikulski | jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369April 4, 2011

Severe Psoriasis Linked to Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events

Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease, and if severe, has been demonstrated to be a risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease. However, the degree to which psoriasis is associated with major adverse cardiac events (MACE), such as heart attack, stroke, and cardiovascular death has not been defined. Now, new research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine has revealed an increased incidence of MACE in patients with severe psoriasis.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Jessica Mikulski | jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369April 4, 2011

Penn Study: Cardiovascular Patients’ Perspectives On Guilt As A Motivational Tool

Current research supports the notion that lifestyle choices influence cardiovascular health, but to what extent specific emotions play is undefined. Now, new research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine has revealed the role that guilt may play as a motivational tool for cardiovascular patients.

facebook twitter google print email
Media Contact:Jessica Mikulski | jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369April 4, 2011

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation as Good as Surgery for High Risk, Operable Patients

Just released data from a clinical trial shows continued promise for a new minimally invasive treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis.  New research presented at the 2011 American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions from the first arm, Cohort A, of the Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) Trial shows that transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is as good as traditional open heart surgery for high-risk, but operable patients.