Perelman School of Medicine

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369November 5, 2014

Readmission Rates Above Average for Survivors of Septic Shock, Penn Study Finds

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Penn Medicine researchers have now shown that while most patients now survive a hospital stay for septic shock, 23 percent will return to the hospital within 30 days, many with another life-threatening condition -- a rate substantially higher than the normal readmission rate at a large academic medical center.

A diagnosis of septic shock was once a near death sentence. At best, survivors suffered a substantially reduced quality of life.

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964November 6, 2014

Penn Study: Olaparib Shows Promise As Treatment Option for Patients with BRCA-Related Cancers

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A Penn Medicine study Finds Olaparib shows success in tumor response rate for patients with BRCA-related cancers. The study's results provide promising treatment option and improved survival rates for patients with ovarian, breast, pancreatic and prostate cancers

Olaparib, an experimental twice-daily oral cancer drug, produces an overall tumor response rate of 26 percent in several advanced cancers associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, according to new research co-led by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658November 10, 2014

Classification of Gene Mutations in a Children's Cancer May Point to Improved Treatments

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Penn Medicine and CHOP Experts Define Riskier Mutations in Neuroblastoma, Setting Stage for Clinical Trial

Oncology researchers studying gene mutations in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are refining their diagnostic tools to predict which patients are more likely to respond to drugs called ALK inhibitors that target such mutations. Removing some of the guesswork in diagnosis and treatment, the researchers say, may lead to more successful outcomes for children with this often-deadly cancer.

Tackling Cavities in India’s Slums with Xylitol Gum

November 7, 2014

Ezekiel Emanuel of the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School, 

Article Source: New York Times
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 14, 2014

Penn Graduate Student Attends Prestigious Meeting of Nobel Laureates

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It’s not every day that a graduate student gets to meet a Nobel Laureate in her field. But this summer Rianne Esquivel, a fourth-year doctoral candidate in microbiology at the University of Pennsylvania, had the opportunity to meet not just one but 37 Nobel Laureates, all leaders in biomedical sciences.

By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660October 10, 2014

Penn Medicine Announces Naming of Paul F. Harron, Jr. Lung Center

A $10 million gift to the University of Pennsylvania to name the Paul F. Harron, Jr.

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964October 14, 2014
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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658October 14, 2014

Penn Medicine: New Gene Therapy for "Bubble Boy" Disease Appears to be Safe, Effective

A new form of gene therapy for boys with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome (SCID-X1), a life-threatening condition also known as “bubble boy” disease, appears to be both effective and safe, according to an international clinical trial with sites in Boston, Cincinnati, Los Angeles, London, a

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369October 14, 2014

Penn Study Evaluates Medical Resident Assessment Tool to Reduce Unnecessary Tests and Treatments

A first-of-its-kind set of questions included in the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE) illustrates the need to better evaluate resident proficiency in high-value care (HVC), according to a new study published in Annals of

Can the US Health Care System Control Ebola’s Spread?

October 13, 2014

Ezekiel Emanuel of the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School says, “We do have to step up training.

Article Source: Al Jazeera America