Perelman School of Medicine

Penn Nabs NIH Grant to Study How Twitter Affects Heart Health

July 6, 2015

David Asch and Raina Merchant of the Perelman School of Medicine are quoted about researching the connection between Twitter and heart health.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658July 6, 2015

Penn Study Suggests Future Precision Medicine Approach to Treating Metabolic Syndrome, Related Disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604July 6, 2015

Penn Researchers Answer Question about Nematode Behavior: Nature, Nurture, or Physics?

blurb: 
Nature versus nurture is an age-old question in biology, centering on whether a given trait is determined by an organism’s genes or by its environment. Most times the answer is “both,” but research at the University of Pennsylvania has found one trait in particular that is not easily described by either.

By Sarah Welsh

Nature versus nurture is an age-old question in biology, centering on whether a given trait is determined by an organism’s genes or by its environment. Most times the answer is “both,” but research at the University of Pennsylvania has found one trait in particular that is not easily described by either.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194July 6, 2015

Blacklegged Tick Populations Have Expanded Via Migration, Penn Biologists Show

blurb: 
In a new study, biologists from the University of Pennsylvania found that blacklegged ticks moved into new areas of the Northeast from established populations, mainly through short-distance, local moves. The results shed light on patterns of disease spread and could have implications for strategies to control ticks in order to reduce disease.

Lyme disease cases are on the rise, with diagnoses occurring in areas that were historically Lyme-free. Scientists attribute the spread to the fact that populations of blacklegged ticks, which carry the bacteria that causes the disease, now flourish in areas once thought to be devoid of ticks.

The Myth of Big, Bad Gluten

July 4, 2015

Sarah A. Tishkoff of the Perelman School of Medicine and the School of Arts & Sciences comments on the current popularity of gluten-free diets.

Article Source: New York Times

Audio: How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked the Car

July 1, 2015

Michael Kahana of the Perelman School of Medicine talks about how quickly memories can be formed.

Panel Targets 3rd Biggest Killer of Americans: Cardiac Arrest

July 1, 2015

Lance Becker of the Perelman School of Medicine is mentioned for serving on panel that focused on cardiac arrest.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

Colorado Movie Rampage Jurors to Hear From Expert on Psychosis

July 1, 2015

Raquel Gur of the Perelman School of Medicine is cited as being the star witness to discuss psychotic disorders.

Article Source: PhillyVoice.com

Short on Sleep? Eat More Spinach and Peanut Butter to Improve Your Memory

June 30, 2015

Andrea Spaeth of the Perelman School of Medicine offers ways to improve daily functionality for people who are lacking sleep.

Article Source: Huffington Post
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194 July 1, 2015

Penn Team Identifies Gene Responsible for Some Cases of Male Infertility

blurb: 
Oftentimes men with a type of infertility called azoospermia don’t know the underlying cause of their condition. But new research led by University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that mutations in an X chromosome gene called TEX11 are responsible for a significant number of cases of infertility — an estimated 1 percent of cases of non-obstructive azoospermia.

In the most severe form of male infertility, men do not make any measurable levels of sperm. This condition, called azoospermia, affects approximately 1 percent of the male population and is responsible for about a sixth of cases of male infertility.