School of Veterinary Medicine

Penn Students Go to the Dogs to Take a Bite Out of Study Stress

May 7, 2010

School of Veterinary Medicine students discuss the School-sponsored "Canine Chillout” event.

Article Source: Philadelphia Daily News

The Corruption Eruption

April 29, 2010

Philip Nichols of the Wharton School discusses corporate corruption.

Article Source: Economist

Gene Therapy Cures Canines of Inherited Form of Day Blindness

April 22, 2010

András Komáromy of the School of Veterinary Medicine and fellow researchers use gene therapy to treat blindness.

Article Source: ScienceDaily
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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 29, 2010

Gene Therapy Success Sets Stage for New Treatments for Inherited Blindness, Penn Veterinary Researchers Say

PHILADELPHIA –- Veterinary vision scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have safely and successfully used a viral vector in targeting a class of photoreceptors of the retina called rods, a critical first step in developing gene therapies for inherited blindness caused by rod degeneration.  

Vatican, University of Maryland Enter Stem Cell Research Partnership

April 23, 2010

John Gearhart of the School of Veterinary Medicine and the School of Medicine discusses a Vatican-sponsored stem-cell research study.

Article Source: Baltimore Sun
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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 21, 2010

Gene Therapy Cures Canines of Inherited Form of Day Blindness, Penn Veterinary Researchers Say

PHILADELPHIA –- Veterinary ophthalmology researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have used gene therapy to restore retinal cone function and day vision in two canine models of congenital achromatopsia, also called rod monochromacy or total color blindness.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 11, 2010

Double Agents: Penn Researchers Identify Immune Cells That Fight Parasites May Promote Allergies and Asthma

PHILADELPHIA –- Millions of people in both the developing and developed world may benefit from new immune-system research findings from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.

The Penn Vet researchers, studying how the immune system operates, have discovered a previously unidentified cell population that may be the body’s double-edged sword, fighting off parasitic infections but also causing the harmful immune responses that can lead to allergies and asthma.

IL25 Elicits a Multipotent Progenitor Cell Population That Promotes TH2 Cytokine Responses

March 3, 2010
Researchers from the School of Veterinary Medicine are cited for their study of immune-system responses.
Article Source: Nature

Severe Eye Injuries From Pets Are Not Rare at All

March 1, 2010
School of Veterinary Medicine researchers are cited for their work on analyzing dog bites.
Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

Is It Ever Right for Animals to Suffer?

February 3, 2010
Adrian Morrison of the School of Veterinary Medicine debates animal-cruelty standards.
Article Source: Washington Post