School of Veterinary Medicine

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194January 7, 2015

Penn Grad Students Share Expertise Across Disciplines to Address Social Problems

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Five Penn graduate students are beginning their journeys as ELISS fellows this spring. Four other Penn students are wrapping up their experiences in the program’s inaugural year and reflecting on the lessons they’ve gleaned about working across disciplines for the public good.

“In today’s world, the stereotype of the nerdy scientist, by himself, looking at a microscope, is no longer accurate and no longer useful,” says Gabriel Innes, a third-year student in the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.

Feathered Forecasters? Tiny Birds Knew Killer Tornadoes Were Coming

December 18, 2014

Erica Miller and Sue McDonnell of the School of Veterinary M

Article Source: NBC News
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194December 8, 2014

Penn Vet-Berkeley Study: New Therapy Holds Promise for Restoring Vision

A new chemical-genetic therapy restores light responses to the retinas of blind mice and dogs and enables the mice to guide their behavior according to visual cues, setting the stage for clinical trial in humans.

A Kidney for Kitty

November 17, 2014

The School of Veterinary Medicine and the Ryan Veterinary Hospital are featured for kidney transplants for kittens.


Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194November 11, 2014

Collaborative Penn-Dresden Study Blocks Multiple Sclerosis Relapses in Mice

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In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and co-investigators have identified a key protein that is able to reduce the severity of a disease equivalent to multiple sclerosis in mice.

In multiple sclerosis, the immune system goes rogue, improperly attacking the body’s own central nervous system. Mobility problems and cognitive impairments may arise as the nerve cells become damaged.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 29, 2014

Epidemiological Study by Penn Vet Professor Investigates Parasite-Schizophrenia Connection

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Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism.

Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194November 4, 2014

James Serpell to Discuss Domestication of Wolves and Wildcats at Penn Science Café

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Penn Science Café series lecture and discussion, “Why Did Early Humans Domesticate Wolves and Wildcats? A Novel Look at a Very Old Question”

WHO: James Serpell
Director, Center for the Interaction of Animals and Society, and
Marie A. Moore Professor of Ethics & Animal Welfare

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194November 4, 2014

Penn-led Team Pieces Together Signaling Pathway Leading to Obesity

As scientists probe the molecular underpinnings of why some people are prone to obesity and some to leanness, they are discovering that weight maintenance is more complicated than the old “calories in, calories out” adage.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 13, 2014

Penn Vet Study Monitors Effects of IV Fluid on Circulation During Surgery

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That network of small vessels, collectively known as the microcirculation, was the focus of a recent study led by a University of Pennsylvania veterinarian. Using a video microscope to record the blood flow of dogs undergoing spay surgeries, the investigation found that increasing the amount of fluid delivered to the animal enhanced the total number of vessels receiving blood flow.

Almost anyone who has spent time in a hospital is familiar with the routine checks of blood pressure and oxygen levels that serve as signposts of a patient’s overall health.

But these measures only reflect the pulsing of blood through the large vessels, arteries and veins, not the smaller arterioles, venules and capillaries, which directly feed tissues and cells.

Penn Vet Says Dogs Can’t Spread Ebola

October 8, 2014

Ronald Harty of the School of Veterinary Medicine comments on a dog that came in contact with an Ebola-infected health-

Article Source: The News Journal (Delaware)