School of Veterinary Medicine

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194February 6, 2015

Mosquitoes Ramp Up Immune Defenses After Sucking Blood, Penn Vet Researcher Finds

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According to a new study by University of Pennsylvania and Imperial College London researchers, mosquitoes ramp up their immune defenses after consuming blood meals, helping to fight off parasites that blood might contain.

If you were about to enter a crowded subway during flu season, packed with people sneezing and coughing, wouldn’t it be helpful if your immune system recognized the potentially risky situation and bolstered its defenses upon stepping into the train?

Can Your Cat Literally Make You Crazy?

January 16, 2015

Gary Smith of the School of Veterinary Medicine is cited for studying toxoplasma gondii and schizophrenia.

Article Source: PetMD

A Visit to the Ryan Veterinary Hospital

At Ryan Veterinary Hospital, the highest levels of medical expertise are matched by deeply human compassion and a recognition of the special bond people have with their animal companions.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194January 7, 2015

Penn Grad Students Share Expertise Across Disciplines to Address Social Problems

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Five Penn graduate students are beginning their journeys as ELISS fellows this spring. Four other Penn students are wrapping up their experiences in the program’s inaugural year and reflecting on the lessons they’ve gleaned about working across disciplines for the public good.

“In today’s world, the stereotype of the nerdy scientist, by himself, looking at a microscope, is no longer accurate and no longer useful,” says Gabriel Innes, a third-year student in the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine.

Feathered Forecasters? Tiny Birds Knew Killer Tornadoes Were Coming

December 18, 2014

Erica Miller and Sue McDonnell of the School of Veterinary M

Article Source: NBC News
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194December 8, 2014

Penn Vet-Berkeley Study: New Therapy Holds Promise for Restoring Vision

A new chemical-genetic therapy restores light responses to the retinas of blind mice and dogs and enables the mice to guide their behavior according to visual cues, setting the stage for clinical trial in humans.

A Kidney for Kitty

November 17, 2014

The School of Veterinary Medicine and the Ryan Veterinary Hospital are featured for kidney transplants for kittens.


Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194November 11, 2014

Collaborative Penn-Dresden Study Blocks Multiple Sclerosis Relapses in Mice

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In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and co-investigators have identified a key protein that is able to reduce the severity of a disease equivalent to multiple sclerosis in mice.

In multiple sclerosis, the immune system goes rogue, improperly attacking the body’s own central nervous system. Mobility problems and cognitive impairments may arise as the nerve cells become damaged.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 29, 2014

Epidemiological Study by Penn Vet Professor Investigates Parasite-Schizophrenia Connection

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Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism.

Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194November 4, 2014

James Serpell to Discuss Domestication of Wolves and Wildcats at Penn Science Café

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Penn Science Café series lecture and discussion, “Why Did Early Humans Domesticate Wolves and Wildcats? A Novel Look at a Very Old Question”

WHO: James Serpell
Director, Center for the Interaction of Animals and Society, and
Marie A. Moore Professor of Ethics & Animal Welfare