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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194April 10, 2015

Penn Dental Medicine Launches First Open Online Course

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The School of Dental Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania's free online course, “Introduction to Dental Medicine,” will allow anyone with access to the Internet to learn what dentistry is all about.

By Sarah Welsh

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 9, 2015

After the Higgs: Penn Gears Up for New Physics Discoveries at CERN

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After a two-year hiatus, the Large Hadron Collider is gearing up for its second run. The LHC enabled the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson, which gives mass to all particles, but the world’s most complicated scientific apparatus is far from finished

by Sarah Welsh

After a two-year hiatus, the Large Hadron Collider at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN, is gearing up for its second run. The LHC enabled the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson, which gives mass to all particles, but the world’s most complicated scientific apparatus is far from finished

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194 April 6, 2015

Shadrack Frimpong of Penn to Establish Community Clinic and Girls’ School in Ghana

(This is the first in a series of features introducing the inaugural Penn President's Engagement Prize winners.)  

As a young student growing up in Tarkwa Breman, a rural village in Ghana, Shadrack Frimpong was surrounded by many bright peers, both male and female. But as the years passed, many of the female students stopped coming to school. 

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 6, 2015

Penn, Johns Hopkins and UCSB Research: Differences in Neural Activity Change Learning Rate

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A new study suggests that recruiting unnecessary parts of the brain for a given task, akin to over-thinking the problem, plays a critical role in the difference between people who pick up a new skill faster or slower.

Why do some people learn a new skill right away, while others only gradually improve? Whatever else may be different about their lives, something must be happening in their brains that captures this variation.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194
Media Contact:Peter Iglinski | peter.iglinski@rochester.edu | 585-273-4726April 6, 2015

Penn-Rochester Study Identifies a Novel Way to Deliver Drugs to Control Dental Plaque

Therapeutic agents intended to reduce dental plaque and prevent tooth decay are often removed by saliva and the act of swallowing before they can take effect. But a team of researchers has developed a way to keep the drugs from being washed away.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194April 6, 2015

Penn Celebrates National Public Health Week

Penn's health schools are celebrating National Public Health Week by featuring stories that highlight public health efforts across the University. Follow along on Twitter at ‪#‎PennOneHealth‬.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604April 3, 2015

Penn Researchers Use ‘Soft’ Nanoparticles to Model Behavior at Interfaces

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By engineering nanoparticles that stick to an oil-water interface but not each other, Penn researchers have created a system that acts like a two-dimensional liquid.

Where water and oil meet, a two-dimensional world exists. This interface presents a potentially useful set of properties for chemists and engineers, but getting anything more complex than a soap molecule to stay there and behave predictably remains a challenge.   

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 31, 2015

Penn Team Discovers New Liquid Crystal Configurations

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Water-based liquid crystals are less well understood than their oil-based counterparts. New research advances the understanding of this class of materials by confining a water-based liquid crystal in a cylinder.

Oil-based liquid crystals are ubiquitous; a deep understanding of their properties is behind the displays found in most computer monitors, televisions and smartphones. Water-based liquid crystals are less well understood, though their biocompatibility makes them a potential candidate for a variety of biological and medical applications. 

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 26, 2015

Swimming Algae Offer Penn Researchers Insights Into Living Fluid Dynamics

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Very little is known about the dynamics of so-called “living fluids,” those containing cells, microorganisms or other biological structures. Penn researchers have shown how a model organism's swimming strokes change along with a fluid's elasticity.

 By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone

None of us would be alive if sperm cells didn’t know how to swim, or if the cilia in our lungs couldn’t prevent fluid buildup. But we know very little about the dynamics of so-called “living fluids,” those containing cells, microorganisms or other biological structures.

Penn Grads Win Chance to Change the World

March 25, 2015

Five undergraduate students are featured as the winners of the University of Pennsylvania’s President’s Engagement Prizes.


Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer