Research

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604October 7, 2011

Penn Physicists’ New Manufacturing Technique Means Higher Quality Nanotube Devices

PHILADELPHIA -- Major advances in materials science and nanotechnology promise to revolutionize electronic devices with unprecedented strength and conductivity, but those promises can’t be fulfilled if the devices can’t be consistently manufactured.

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Media Contact:Jill DiSanto | jdisanto@upenn.edu | 215-898-4820October 7, 2011

Penn GSE Researcher Weighs In on the Dream Act

What if there were 65,000 people in the United States who, despite successfully completing their secondary education, had no hope for the future? There are.

Devices That Can Listen In on Cellphone Traffic, Control Your Phone

October 4, 2011

Matt Blaze of the School of Engineering and Applied Science comments on federal use ofsecret devices for locating people via cellphones.

Article Source: Wall Street Journal

Fast Vocal Muscles Are Behind Bats’ Skill

September 30, 2011

Penn researchers are highlighted for their bat echolocation research.

Article Source: New York Times
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Media Contact:Jessica Mikulski | jessica.mikulski@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369October 1, 2011

Penn Study Shows Increased Alzheimer's Biomarkers in Patients After Anesthesia and Surgery

Philadelphia - The possibility that anesthesia and surgery produces lasting cognitive losses has gained attention over past decades, but direct evidence has remained ambiguous and controversial. Now, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania provide further evidence that Alzheimer's pathology may be increased in patients after surgery.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.Kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658October 3, 2011

Rebooting the System: Immune Cells Repair Damaged Lung Tissues after Flu Infection, Penn Study Finds

There’s more than one way to mop up after a flu infection. Now, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania report this week in Nature Immunology that a previously unrecognized population of lung immune cells orchestrate the body’s repair response following flu infection.

Stem Cells Helped Heal a Dog’s Crippling Injuries – Maybe

October 3, 2011

John Gearhart and George Costarelis of the Perelman School of Medicine comment on stem cell treatments.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Jacquie Posey | | 215-898-6460September 30, 2011

Penn: U.S. Obesity Epidemic Contributes to Its Poor International Ranking in Life Expectancy

 

PHILADELPHIA -- The United States has the highest prevalence of obesity, measured by body mass index, and one of the lowest life expectancies among high-income countries.  A new study by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania directly links America’s high obesity rate to the country’s lower longevity ranking compared to other high-income countries. 
           

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604September 29, 2011

Penn Researcher Helps Identify 'Superfast' Muscles Responsible for Bat Echolocation

PHILADELPHIA – As nocturnal animals, bats rely echolocation to navigate and hunt prey. By bouncing sound waves off objects, including the bugs that are their main diet, bats can produce an accurate representation of their environment in total darkness. Now, researchers at the University of Southern Denmark and the University of Pennsylvania have shown that this amazing ability is enabled by a physical trait never before seen in mammals: so-called “superfast” muscles. 

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604September 26, 2011

Penn Researchers Show New Neural Mechanism Responsible for Recognizing Scenes

PHILADELPHIA — One of the aims of cognitive neuroscience is to understand how the brain works on two distinct levels: the psychological experience of mental tasks and the underlying neurobiology that enables them. Tools like functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, have allowed cognitive neuroscientists to connect those two levels for a variety of everyday experiences, such as solving a math problem or remembering a word.