Research

Law Review: Penn Professor and Students Help Win Supreme Court Case

July 14, 2010

Stephanos Bibas of the Law School leads a team of law students in providing counsel on a Supreme Court case.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Kim Guenther | kim.guenther@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-662-6183 July 7, 2010

Fouls Go Left: Soccer Referees May Be Biased Based on Play’s Direction of Motion

Soccer referees may have an unconscious bias towards calling fouls based on a play’s direction of motion, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found that soccer experts made more foul calls when action moved right-to-left, or leftward, compared to rightward action, suggesting that two referees watching the same play from different vantage points may be inclined to make a different call.

 

Soccer Refs Subconsciously Call More Fouls on Plays to the Left

July 8, 2010

Penn researchers are cited for their study of a potential referee bias at the World Cup.

Article Source: Wired
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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604July 12, 2010

Making the Invisible Visible: Verbal Cues Enhance Visual Detection, Says Penn Researcher

PHILADELPHIA –- Cognitive psychologists at the University of Pennsylvania and University of California have shown that an image displayed too quickly to be seen by an observer can be detected if the participant first hears the name of the object.

Low-Tech Pregnancy Device Might Help Birth Attendants Reduce Maternal Mortality

July 6, 2010

Barbara Reale of the School of Nursing leads birth simulation exercises.

Article Source: Washington Post

Audio: Can Genes and Brain Abnormalities Create Killers?

July 6, 2010

Stephen Morse of the Law School and the School of Medicine discusses neurolaw and the criminal mind.

Article Source: National Public Radio
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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 21, 2010

Platelet Avatars: Penn Bioengineers Create Simulator to Test Blood Platelets in Virtual Heart Attacks

PHILADELPHIA –- A team of bioengineers from the University of Pennsylvania Institute for Medicine and Engineering have trained a computer neural network model to accurately predict how blood platelets would respond to complex conditions found during a heart attack or stroke.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 17, 2010

Penn Physicists Honored With 2010 Europhysics Prize

PHILADELPHIA -- Charles Kane and Eugene Mele of the University of Pennsylvania are among five scientists awarded the 2010 Europhysics Prize of the European Physical Society Condensed Matter Division for the theoretical prediction and experimental observation of the quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604 June 16, 2010

Sex, Drugs and Moral Goals: A Penn Psychology Study of Reproductive Strategies and Recreational Drug Use

PHILADELPHIA –- Why is there so much disagreement about whether using recreational drugs is morally wrong? A University of Pennsylvania psychology study shows that the debate about drugs might really be about sex.

The study compared two competing theories.

One theory -- the conventional wisdom in political science -- sees drug attitudes as primarily coming from people's political ideology, level of religious commitment, and personality, for example, openness to experience. 

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 10, 2010

University of Pennsylvania Analysis: Contrary to Popular Models, Sugar Is Not Burned by Self-Control Tasks

PHILADELPHIA –- Contradicting a popular model of self-control, a University of Pennsylvania psychologist says the data from a 2007 study argues against the idea that glucose is the resource used to manage self control and that humans rely on this energy source for will power.

The analysis, conducted by Robert Kurzban and published in the current issue of the journal Evolutionary Psychology, shows that evidence previously presented in favor of the claim that the brain consumes extra glucose when people exert self-control shows no such thing.