Research

Smoking Withdrawal Changes Brain Network Connectivity, Penn Team Finds

March 12, 2014

Research led by Caryn Lerman of the Perelman School of Medicine is highlighted.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653March 12, 2014

Nicotine Withdrawal Weakens Brain Connections Tied to Self-Control Over Cigarette Cravings, Penn Study Finds

People who try to quit smoking often say that kicking the habit makes the voice inside telling them to light up even louder, but why people succumb to those cravings so often has never been fully understood.  Now, a new brain imaging study in this week’s JAMA Psychiatry from scientists in Penn Medicine and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Intramural Research Pro

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658March 12, 2014

Penn Study: Protein Key to Cell Motility Has Implications for Stopping Cancer Metastasis

“Cell movement is the basic recipe of life, and all cells have the capacity to move,” says Roberto Dominguez, PhD, professor of Physiology at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania.

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Media Contact:Amanda Mott | ammott@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422March 14, 2014

Penn IUR Hosts Discussion on the Future of Urbanization: What Can We Learn from Asian Cities?

blurb: 
Today, almost 80% of all city dwellers live in Asian cities. In The Future of Urbanization: What Can We Learn from Asian Cities? a panel will examine the challenges and opportunities of urban life in Asia and suggest lessons for cities around the globe.

Today, almost 80% of all city dwellers live in Asian cities. In "The Future of Urbanization: What Can We Learn from Asian Cities?" a panel will examine the challenges and opportunities of urban life in Asia and suggest lessons for cities around the globe. 

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653March 5, 2014

Penn Medicine: Personalized Gene Therapy Locks Out HIV, Paving the Way to Control Virus Without Antiretroviral Drugs

University of Pennsylvania researchers have successfully genetically engineered the immune cells of 12 HIV positive patients to resist infection, and decreased the viral loads of some patients taken off antiretroviral drug therapy (ADT) entirely—including one patient whose levels became undetectable.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604March 5, 2014

Penn Researchers Model a Key Breaking Point Involved in Traumatic Brain Injury

blurb: 
An interdisciplinary team of researchers is using mathematical modeling to better understand the mechanisms at play in traumatic brain injury, with an eye toward protecting against its long-term consequences.

Even the mildest form of a traumatic brain injury, better known as a concussion, can deal permanent, irreparable damage. Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania is using mathematical modeling to better understand the mechanisms at play in this kind of injury, with an eye toward protecting the brain from its long-term consequences.

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Media Contact:Jeanne Leong | jleong@upenn.edu | 215-573-8151February 27, 2014

Penn’s Morris Arboretum Is a Year-round Oasis

It may be that many people don’t think of the Morris Arboretum when it is cold and snowy outside, but the University of Pennsylvania site offers unique scenic views and seasonal activities aplenty even in the winter.
 

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 27, 2014

Muscle-controlling Neurons Know When They Mess Up, According to Penn Research

blurb: 
A team of researchers from Penn and Princeton has begun to unravel the decades-spanning paradox concerning how the brain's motor-control feedback system works.

Whether it is playing a piano sonata or acing a tennis serve, the brain needs to orchestrate precise, coordinated control over the body’s many muscles. Moreover, there needs to be some kind of feedback from the senses should any of those movements go wrong.

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Media Contact:Amanda Mott | ammott@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422February 24, 2014

After a Decade, Penn Institute of Urban Research Celebrates Partnerships and Progress

blurb: 
After a decade of work, Penn IUR looks at its evolution, its many partnerships and its accomplishment, and looks forward to what is next for the urban-focused research entity.

With the number of city dwellers expected to double in the next 30 years, bringing the tally to 7 billion city inhabitants worldwide, urbanization poses a wide range of critical issues, including housing, education, food security, energy, crime, economic development, income equality and public health.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 24, 2014

Penn Researchers Show Nuclear Stiffness Keeps Stem Cells and Cancer Cells in Place

blurb: 
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that cell migration through micron-size pores is regulated by lamin-A, a nuclear protein that is very similar to the fibrous ones that make up hair.

Adult stem cells and cancer cells have many things in common, including an ability to migrate through tiny gaps in tissue. Both types of cells also experience a trade-off when it comes to this ability; having a flexible nucleus makes migration easier but is worse at protecting the nucleus’ DNA compared to a stiffer nucleus.