Research

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604July 26, 2010

Collaboration Solves Structure of Herpes Virus Protein, Provides New Drug Directions

PHILADELPHIA  -– The mechanism by which a herpes virus invades cells has remained a mystery to scientists, but now research from Tufts University and the University of Pennsylvania reveals the unusual structure of a key member of the protein complex that allows a herpes virus to invade cells.

The new map details an essential piece of the herpes virus “cell-entry machinery,” providing scientists with a new target for antiviral drugs.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604 July 23, 2010

First Step Towards Electronic DNA Sequencing: Translocation Through Graphene Nanopores

PHILADELPHIA –- Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a new, carbon-based nanoscale platform to electrically detect single DNA molecules.

Using electric fields, the tiny DNA strands are pushed through nanoscale-sized, atomically thin pores in a graphene nanopore platform that ultimately may be important for fast electronic sequencing of the four chemical bases of DNA based on their unique electrical signature.

Kidney Disease Is Parasite-Slaying Protein's Downside

July 16, 2010

Sarah Tishkoff of the School of Medicine and the School of Arts and Sciences discusses “Jekyll-and-Hyde genetic variations."

Article Source: Science
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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604July 21, 2010

Collaboration Leads to Simpler Method for Building Varieties of Nanocrystal Superlattices

PHILADELPHIA –- Collaboration by chemists, physicists and materials scientists at the University of Pennsylvania has created a simple and inexpensive method to rapidly grow centimeter-scale membranes of binary nanocrystal superlattices, or BNSLs, by crystallizing a mixture of nanocrystals on a liquid surface.

Mirror, Mirror: Putting More Protection in Sunscreen

July 21, 2010

William James of the School of Medicine discusses sunscreen’s effectiveness.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer

Aged 9,000 Years, Ancient Beer Finally Hits Stores

July 20, 2010

Patrick McGovern of Penn Museum and the School of Arts and Sciences uses historical evidence to resurrect ancient brews.

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Media Contact: | | July 19, 2010

Penn Researchers Discover New Role for Master Regulator in Cell Metabolism, Response to Stress

AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK, is a master regulator protein of metabolism that is conserved from yeast to humans. When a cell is low on fuel, AMPK shuts down processes that use energy and turns on processes that produce energy.

Biologists have been studying how AMPK works for several decades and know that once it is activated, AMPK turns on a large number of genes by passing the "make more energy" message through numerous signaling cascades in the cell. What was not known, until now, was that AMPK also works via an epigenetic mechanism to slow down or stop cell growth.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | (215) 349-5658 July 19, 2010

Rescuing Fruit Flies from Alzheimer’s Disease

Investigators have found that fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) males -- in which the activity of an Alzheimer’s disease protein is reduced by 50 percent -- show impairments in learning and memory as they age. What’s more, the researchers were able to prevent the age-related deficits by treating the flies with drugs such as lithium, or by genetic manipulations that reduced nerve-cell signaling.

Click here to view the full release.

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Media Contact:Jordan Reese | jreese@upenn.edu | July 19, 2010

Seven in School of Veterinary Medicine Honored With Teaching Awards

Seven faculty members in the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine are recipients of 2010 teaching awards.   

Traveling as a Professor

July 13, 2010

Marybeth Gasman of the Graduate School of Education authors an op-ed on how normal discourse while traveling often leads to research topics.