Research

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | Katie.Delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964June 19, 2014

Penn Study Reveals a Common Genetic Link in Fatal Autoimmune Skin Disease

Autoimmune disease occurs when the body's own natural defense system rebels against itself.  One example is pemphigus vulgaris (PV), a blistering skin disease in which autoantibodies attack desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), the protein that binds together skin cells. 

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658June 19, 2014

Diabetes Susceptibility Gene Regulates Health of Cell's Powerhouse, Penn Study Finds

A team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that a susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes regulates self-destruction of the cell’s energy factory. They report their findings this week in Cell.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658June 19, 2014

Penn Study: Genomic "Dark Matter" of Embryonic Lungs Controls Proper Development of Airways

It’s a long way from DNA to RNA to protein, and only about two percent of a person’s genome is eventually converted into proteins.

Pros, Cons to Dissolving Lung Clots: Study

June 17, 2014

Jay Giri of the Perelman School of Medicine comments on patients who might be at less risk for bleeding from clot-busting drugs.

Article Source: HealthDay
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194June 19, 2014

Penn Biologist Daniel Janzen Selected to Receive Blue Planet Prize

blurb: 
Daniel Janzen of the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Biology was chosen to receive a 2014 Blue Planet Prize, an international environmental award sponsored by the Asahi Glass Foundation.

Daniel Janzen of the University of Pennsylvania’s Department of Biology in the School of Arts & Sciences was chosen to receive a 2014 Blue Planet Prize,

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660June 17, 2014

Penn Medicine Study Shows "Clot-Busting" Drugs Reduce Deaths from Pulmonary Embolism by Nearly Half

Bringing clarity to a decades-long debate, a national team of researchers led by experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that adding clot-busting medications known as thrombolytics to conventional approaches when treating sudden-onset pulmonary embolism patients is associated with 47

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660June 18, 2014

Penn Anesthesiologists Identify Top Five Practices that Could be Avoided

A team of researchers led by Penn Medicine anesthesiologists have pinpointed the “top five” most common perioperative procedures that are supported by the least amount of clinical evidence, in an effort to direct providers to make more cost-effective treatment decisions.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194June 18, 2014

Penn Team Links Placental Marker of Prenatal Stress to Neurodevelopmental Problems

blurb: 
New findings by University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine scientists suggest that an enzyme found in the placenta is likely playing an important role in translating stress experienced by a mother early in pregnancy into a reprogramming of her developing baby's brain.

When a woman experiences a stressful event early in pregnancy, the risk of her child developing autism spectrum disorders or schizophrenia increases. Yet how maternal stress is transmitted to the brain of the developing fetus, leading to these problems in neurodevelopment, is poorly understood. 

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 18, 2014

Penn Lends Support to National ‘Maker Movement’

In conjunction with the first White House Maker Faire being held today, the University of Pennsylvania signed a joint letter along with more than 150 other institutions, pledging support to foster a “generation of makers.” The letter details the need for young tinkerers, inventors and entrepreneurs to bring life to future innovations.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 17, 2014

Preview of Penn Engineering’s New 3-D Printing Lab as Part of National ‘Day of Making’

This fall, thanks to an anonymous $250,000 gift, the University of Pennsylvania‘s School of Engineering and Applied Science will be opening the AddLab, a new additive manufacturing facility that will feature a suite of state-of-the-art 3-D printing tools.

Who

Robert W. Carpick

John Henry Towne Professor and Department Chair
Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics
School of Engineering and Applied Science          
University of Pennsylvania

Mechanical Engineering Faculty and Students

What

Tour of new additive manufacturing facility
Demonstration of 3-D printed objects
 

When

Wednesday, June 18, 12-1 p.m. 

Where

Towne Building Room 187 (gather by the CyberCafe)
Chancellor Walk Entrance
Accessible from 34th and Walnut streets

Details

This fall, thanks to an anonymous $250,000 gift, the University of Pennsylvania‘s School of Engineering and Applied Science will be opening the AddLab, a new additive manufacturing facility that will feature a suite of state-of-the-art 3-D printing tools. Professor Robert Carpick, chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, will lead a preview of the facility; other members of the department will demonstrate 3-D printers and the kinds of objects they can make.

The event is timed to coincide with the first White House Maker Faire and national "Day of Making," a celebration of America as a nation of tinkerers, inventors and entrepreneurs who are using cutting-edge technologies like 3-D printers, laser cutters, desktop machine tools and free, user-friendly design software, democratizing the act of making and enabling citizens to build just about anything.

“Penn's founder Benjamin Franklin was an author, diplomat, inventor, physicist, engineer, politician and printer,” Carpick said. “While we can only imagine what he would think of today's revolution in manufacturing that is being brought about by the advent of 3-D printing, we are sure that he'd be proud to see Penn making its mark in the area.”

The event is free and open to the public.