Research

My Q and A With Sleep Expert Mathias Basner on the Science of Sleep

July 8, 2015

Mathias Basner of the Perelman School of Medicine is interviewed about sleep deprivation, the relationship between work and sleep and other topics about the science of sleep.

Article Source: Huffington Post
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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653July 8, 2015

Remediating Abandoned, Inner City Buildings Reduces Crime and Violence in Surrounding Areas, Penn Study Finds

Fixing up abandoned buildings in the inner city doesn’t just eliminate eyesores, it can also significantly reduce crime and violence, including gun assaults, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Penn’s Perelman School of Medicine report in the first study to demonstrate the direct impact of building remediation efforts on crime.

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369July 7, 2015

Affordable Care Act Results in Dramatic Drop in Out-of-Pocket Prices for Prescription Contraceptives, Penn Medicine Study Finds

Average out-of-pocket spending for oral contraceptive pills and the intrauterine device (IUD), the two most common forms of contraception for women, has decreased significantly since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) took effect.

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369July 7, 2015

Serious Adverse Events Rare in Healthy Volunteers Participating in Phase I Drug Trials, Penn Medicine Study Finds

Many people believe that phase I trials with healthy volunteers are very risky and because they pose risks with no benefits, unethical. But how risky are such trials?

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658July 2, 2015

Penn Medicine: Genetic Variation Determines Protein’s Response to Anti-diabetic Drug

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194July 8, 2015

Disrupting Cells’ ‘Powerhouses’ Can Lead to Tumor Growth, Penn Study Finds

blurb: 
A study by University of Pennsylvania researchers implicates defects in mitochondria, the energy-production centers of cells, as playing a key role in the transition from normal to cancerous.

Cancer cells defy the rules by which normal cells abide. They can divide without cease, invade distant tissues and consume glucose at abnormal rates.

As Blacklegged Ticks Migrate, Lyme Disease Follows

July 6, 2015

Camilo Khatchikian of the School of Arts & Sciences comments on researching the migration of ticks and the disease that has followed this journey.

Article Source: UPI.com
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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658July 6, 2015

Penn Study Suggests Future Precision Medicine Approach to Treating Metabolic Syndrome, Related Disorders

In the first study of its kind, Penn researchers have shown how an anti-diabetic drug can have variable effects depending on small natural differences in DNA sequence between individuals.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604July 6, 2015

Penn Researchers Answer Question about Nematode Behavior: Nature, Nurture, or Physics?

blurb: 
Nature versus nurture is an age-old question in biology, centering on whether a given trait is determined by an organism’s genes or by its environment. Most times the answer is “both,” but research at the University of Pennsylvania has found one trait in particular that is not easily described by either.

By Sarah Welsh

Nature versus nurture is an age-old question in biology, centering on whether a given trait is determined by an organism’s genes or by its environment. Most times the answer is “both,” but research at the University of Pennsylvania has found one trait in particular that is not easily described by either.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194July 6, 2015

Blacklegged Tick Populations Have Expanded Via Migration, Penn Biologists Show

blurb: 
In a new study, biologists from the University of Pennsylvania found that blacklegged ticks moved into new areas of the Northeast from established populations, mainly through short-distance, local moves. The results shed light on patterns of disease spread and could have implications for strategies to control ticks in order to reduce disease.

Lyme disease cases are on the rise, with diagnoses occurring in areas that were historically Lyme-free. Scientists attribute the spread to the fact that populations of blacklegged ticks, which carry the bacteria that causes the disease, now flourish in areas once thought to be devoid of ticks.