Research

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604September 9, 2014

Penn Research Shows How Brain Can Tell Magnitude of Errors

University of Pennsylvania researchers have made another advance in understanding how the brain detects errors caused by unexpected sensory events. This type of error detection is what allows the brain to learn from its mistakes, which is critical for improving fine motor control.  

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369September 3, 2014

Penn Study Shows Better Outcomes for Sepsis Patients Treated in Hospitals with Higher Volume of Cases

Patients with sepsis, one of the most time-sensitive and hard-to-detect illnesses in medicine, are more likely to survive the life-threatening condition when treated at a hospital that sees a higher volume of sepsis cases.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604September 5, 2014

Penn Engineers Advance Understanding of Graphene’s Friction Properties

An interdisciplinary team of engineers from the University of Pennsylvania has made a discovery regarding the surface properties of graphene, the Nobel-prize winning material that consists of an atomically thin sheet of carbon atoms.

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Media Contact:Amanda Mott | ammott@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422September 4, 2014

Penn Sophomore Seeks to Globalize Iceland’s Innovations in Renewable Energy

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This summer, University of Pennsylvania sophomore Elizabeth Dresselhaus of Boulder, Colo., studied renewable energy in Iceland, a country with vast reserves of geothermal energy and hydropower.

By Christina Cook

Dinosaur Nest Had 24 Hatchlings and a ‘Babysitter’

August 29, 2014

Researchers from the School of Arts & Sciences and the School of Veterinary Medicine are highlighted for analyzing a 120-million-year-old fossil of a possible dinosaur nest.

Article Source: CBS News
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194September 4, 2014

Plant-based Research at Penn Prevents Complication of Hemophilia Treatment in Mice

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In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and the University of Florida College of Medicine teamed up to develop a strategy to prevent a common complication of hemophilia treatment.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658August 26, 2014

Drug for Rare Blood Disorder Developed at Penn Receives Orphan Drug Status from European Union

A Penn Medicine-developed drug has received orphan status in Europe this week for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), a rare, life-threatening disease that causes anemia due to destruction of red blood cells and thrombosis.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658August 28, 2014

Penn Medicine Study: Attacking a Rare Disease at its Source With Gene Therapy

Treating the rare disease MPS I is a challenge. MPS I, caused by the deficiency of a key enzyme called IDUA, eventually leads to the abnormal accumulation of certain molecules and cell death. 

Possible Dinosaur Nest May Have Had ‘Babysitter,’ Penn Study Finds

August 27, 2014

School of Arts & Sciences doctoral student Brandon Hedrick and Peter Dodson of SAS and the School of Veterinary Medicine are highlighted for leading a study of 120 million-year-old dinosaur fossil.

Article Source: Philly.com
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194August 28, 2014

Penn-NIH Team Discovers New Type of Cell Movement in 3D Matrix

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In a new study from the University of Pennsylvania and National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, scientists used an innovative technique to study how cells move in a three-dimensional matrix, similar to the structure of certain tissues, such as the skin. They discovered an entirely new type of cell movement whereby the nucleus helps propel cells through the matrix like a piston in an engine, generating pressure that thrusts the cell’s plasma membrane forward.

For decades, researchers have used petri dishes to study cell movement. These classic tissue culture tools, however, only permit two-dimensional movement, very different from the three-dimensional movements that cells make in a human body.