Research

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604January 21, 2015

Twitter Can Predict Rates of Coronary Heart Disease, According to Penn Research

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Penn researchers have now shown that the social media platform Twitter can serve as a dashboard indicator of a community’s psychological well being and can predict rates of heart disease.

Twitter has broken news stories, launched and ended careers, started social movements and toppled governments, all by being an easy, direct and immediate way for people to share what’s on their minds.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194December 31, 2014

Penn Scientists Identify Patterns of RNA Regulation in the Nuclei of Plants

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In a new study done in plants, University of Pennsylvania biologists give a global view of the patterns that can affect the various RNA regulatory processes that occur before these molecules move into the cytoplasm, where they are translated into the proteins that make up a living organism.

When the human genome was first sequenced, experts predicted they would find about 100,000 genes. The actual number has turned out to be closer to 20,000, just a few thousand more than fruit flies have. The question logically arose: how can a relatively small number of genes lay the blueprint for the complexities of the human body?

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604December 19, 2014

Penn Researchers Model the Mechanics of Cells’ Long-range Communication

Interdisciplinary research at the University of Pennsylvania is showing how cells interact over long distances within fibrous tissue, like that associated with many diseases of the liver, lungs and other organs.

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369December 18, 2014

Penn Study Demonstrates Effective Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes Patients with Severe Hypoglycemia

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients who have developed low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as a complication of insulin treatments over time are able to regain normal internal recognition of the condition after receiving pancreatic islet cell transplantation, according to a new study led by researchers at the 

La matematica degli origami (per farci tutt’altro)

December 15, 2014

Toen Castle and Randall Kamien of the School of Arts & Sciences are featured for their kirigami research.

Article Source: Wired.it (Italy)
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194December 18, 2014

Penn and UGA Awarded $23.4 Million Contract for Pathogen Genomics Database

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A five-year, $23.4 million contract from the NIH will support a growing database of genomic information about disease-causing microbes, co-directed by the University of Pennsylvania's David Roos.

At the turn of the millennium, the cost to sequence a single human genome exceeded $50 million, and the process took a decade to complete. Microbes have genomes, too, and the first reference genome for a malaria parasite was completed in 2002 at a cost of roughly $15 million. But today researchers can sequence a genome in a single afternoon for just a few thousand dollars.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658December 11, 2014

Penn Researchers Tame the Inflammatory Response in Kidney Dialysis

Frequent kidney dialysis is essential for the approximately 350,000 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients in the United States.

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Media Contact:Greg Richter | gregory.richter@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-614-1937December 12, 2014

Penn Medicine Study: U.S. Workers Sacrifice Sleep for Work Hours and Long Commutes

An increasing number of studies show that chronically restricted sleep to less than seven hours per day impairs performance, increases the risk for errors and accidents, and is associated with negative health consequences like obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194December 12, 2014

Penn Senior Studies the Past to Understand the Future

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A double major in science, technology and society and philosophy, Paul Marett’s interest in the historical figures, who both predicted and influenced their futures, has led him down a unique path. For his senior thesis, he’s researching a collection of largely forgotten books published in Britain between World War I and II.

By Madeleine Stone   @themadstone

Science fiction is often said to reflect human culture: who we are today and what we dream to be in the future. But those who write on the future also have a hand in shaping it. Indeed, many future thinkers of the past have predicted technologies of the present with uncanny accuracy.

Long Radiation Treatments Called Unnecessary in Many Breast Cancer Cases

December 10, 2014

New research about breast cancer treatment from the Perelman School of Medicine’s Justin Bekelman and Ezekiel Emanuel, also of the Whar

Article Source: New York Times