Research

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Media Contact:Jeanne Leong | jleong@upenn.edu | 215-573-8151February 27, 2014

Penn’s Morris Arboretum Is a Year-round Oasis

It may be that many people don’t think of the Morris Arboretum when it is cold and snowy outside, but the University of Pennsylvania site offers unique scenic views and seasonal activities aplenty even in the winter.
 

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 27, 2014

Muscle-controlling Neurons Know When They Mess Up, According to Penn Research

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A team of researchers from Penn and Princeton has begun to unravel the decades-spanning paradox concerning how the brain's motor-control feedback system works.

Whether it is playing a piano sonata or acing a tennis serve, the brain needs to orchestrate precise, coordinated control over the body’s many muscles. Moreover, there needs to be some kind of feedback from the senses should any of those movements go wrong.

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Media Contact:Amanda Mott | ammott@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422February 24, 2014

After a Decade, Penn Institute of Urban Research Celebrates Partnerships and Progress

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After a decade of work, Penn IUR looks at its evolution, its many partnerships and its accomplishment, and looks forward to what is next for the urban-focused research entity.

With the number of city dwellers expected to double in the next 30 years, bringing the tally to 7 billion city inhabitants worldwide, urbanization poses a wide range of critical issues, including housing, education, food security, energy, crime, economic development, income equality and public health.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 24, 2014

Penn Researchers Show Nuclear Stiffness Keeps Stem Cells and Cancer Cells in Place

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Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown that cell migration through micron-size pores is regulated by lamin-A, a nuclear protein that is very similar to the fibrous ones that make up hair.

Adult stem cells and cancer cells have many things in common, including an ability to migrate through tiny gaps in tissue. Both types of cells also experience a trade-off when it comes to this ability; having a flexible nucleus makes migration easier but is worse at protecting the nucleus’ DNA compared to a stiffer nucleus.

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Media Contact:Amanda Mott | ammott@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422 February 19, 2014

Penn IUR Hosts Dialogue: Building Scholarship Critical to Building a Sustainable Urban Future

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A discussion hosted by the Penn Institute for Urban Research and HUD-sponsored dialogue in advance of the U.S. delegation to the World Urban Forum 7, will cover the role research plays in understanding the present challenges of urban development.
 
WHAT: “Research to Practice: Building Scholarship Critical to Building a Sustainable Urban Future,” a discussion hosted by the Penn Institute for Urban Research and HUD-sponsored dialogue in advance of the U.S.
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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604February 18, 2014

Three Penn Researchers Awarded Sloan Fellowships

Three University of Pennsylvania faculty members are among this year’s Sloan Fellowship recipients. Since 1955, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has granted yearly fellowships to early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them the next generation of scientific leaders.

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660February 14, 2014

Penn Study Finds Topiramate Reduces Heavy Drinking Among Patients Seeking to Cut Down on Alcohol Consumption

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Researchers at Pereleman School of Penn Medicine have shown that topiramate can be helpful in treating problem drinkers whose aim is to curb their alcohol consumption – particularly among a specific group of patients whose genetic makeup appears to be linked to the efficacy of the therapy.

Heavy drinking is common in the United States and takes a personal and societal toll, with an annual estimated cost of $223.5 billion due to losses in workplace productivity, health care and criminal justice expenses.

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Media Contact:Steve Graff | stephen.graff@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5653February 14, 2014

Mental Health Patients up to Four Times More Likely to Be Infected with HIV, Penn Medicine Study Finds

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People receiving mental health care are up to four times more likely to be infected with HIV than the general population, according to a new study published Feb. 13 in the American Journal of Public Health from researchers at Penn Medicine and other institutions who tested over 1,000 patients in care in Philadelphia and Baltimore.

People receiving mental health care are up to four times more likely to be infected with HIV than the general population, according to a new study published Feb.

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Media Contact:Kim Menard | kim.menard@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-662-6183February 11, 2014

Teledermatology App System Offers Efficiencies and Can Reliably Prioritize Inpatient Consults

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A new Penn Medicine study shows that remote consultations from dermatologists using a secure smart phone app are reliable at prioritizing care for hospitalized patients with skin conditions.

A new Penn Medicine study shows that remote consultations from dermatologists using a secure smart phone app are reliable at prioritizing care for hospitalized patients with skin conditions.

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194February 12, 2014

Penn Geophysicist Teams With Mathematicians to Describe How River Rocks Round

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A new study by the University of Pennsylvania’s Douglas Jerolmack, working with mathematicians at Budapest University of Technology and Economics, has found that rocks traveling down a riverbed follow a distinct pattern, first becoming rounder, and then smaller.

For centuries, geologists have recognized that the rocks that line riverbeds tend to be smaller and rounder further downstream. But these experts have not agreed on the reason these patterns exist. Abrasion causes rocks to grind down and become rounder as they are transported down the river.