Research

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194November 11, 2014

Collaborative Penn-Dresden Study Blocks Multiple Sclerosis Relapses in Mice

blurb: 
In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and co-investigators have identified a key protein that is able to reduce the severity of a disease equivalent to multiple sclerosis in mice.

In multiple sclerosis, the immune system goes rogue, improperly attacking the body’s own central nervous system. Mobility problems and cognitive impairments may arise as the nerve cells become damaged.

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Media Contact:Anna Duerr | anna.duerr@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-8369November 5, 2014

Readmission Rates Above Average for Survivors of Septic Shock, Penn Study Finds

blurb: 
Penn Medicine researchers have now shown that while most patients now survive a hospital stay for septic shock, 23 percent will return to the hospital within 30 days, many with another life-threatening condition -- a rate substantially higher than the normal readmission rate at a large academic medical center.

A diagnosis of septic shock was once a near death sentence. At best, survivors suffered a substantially reduced quality of life.

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964November 6, 2014

Penn Study: Olaparib Shows Promise As Treatment Option for Patients with BRCA-Related Cancers

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A Penn Medicine study Finds Olaparib shows success in tumor response rate for patients with BRCA-related cancers. The study's results provide promising treatment option and improved survival rates for patients with ovarian, breast, pancreatic and prostate cancers

Olaparib, an experimental twice-daily oral cancer drug, produces an overall tumor response rate of 26 percent in several advanced cancers associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, according to new research co-led by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658November 10, 2014

Classification of Gene Mutations in a Children's Cancer May Point to Improved Treatments

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Penn Medicine and CHOP Experts Define Riskier Mutations in Neuroblastoma, Setting Stage for Clinical Trial

Oncology researchers studying gene mutations in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma are refining their diagnostic tools to predict which patients are more likely to respond to drugs called ALK inhibitors that target such mutations. Removing some of the guesswork in diagnosis and treatment, the researchers say, may lead to more successful outcomes for children with this often-deadly cancer.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 10, 2014

Penn Center for Innovation Celebrates Launch

WHO:

Amy Gutmann
President, University of Pennsylvania

Michael A. Nutter
Mayor, City of Philadelphia

Dawn Bonnell
Vice Provost for Research

John Swartley
Director, Penn Center for Innovation
Assistant Vice Provost for Research

WHAT:

 Penn Center for Innovation Launch Celebration

WHEN:

Nov. 17, 2014
4 p.m – 6 p.m.

WHERE:

Prince Theater
The Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts
3680 Walnut St.
Philadelphia

ABOUT:

The Penn Center for Innovation, a new initiative that will provide the infrastructure, leadership and resources needed to transfer promising Penn inventions, know-how and related assets into the marketplace for the public good, will be formally launched at an event on Monday, November 17.

Gutmann, Nutter, Bonnell and Swartley will discuss how PCI will accelerate the translation of Penn discoveries and ideas into commercial products, businesses, and services, as well as the role the University plays in the local, national and global entrepreneurial ecosystem. 

Top Penn researchers and members of the business and venture capital community will have the opportunity to meet at a reception to follow. 

Attendance is free and open to the public, but email registration is mandatory.    

Chomping on Ice Might Provide a Mental Boost for Those With Disorder, Study Finds

November 8, 2014

Melissa Hunt of the School of Arts & Sciences is highlighted for studying why people with iron-deficiency anemia of

Article Source: Washington Post
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Media Contact:Amanda Mott | ammott@upenn.edu | 215-898-1422October 30, 2014

Penn Undergrad Works to Shed New Light on Nobel Prize Winner’s Novels

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University of Pennsylvania senior Emmett Wynn wanted to get a glimpse of what graduate school would be like before diving into the application process. So the comparative literature and intellectual history major from Albuquerque, N.M., enrolled in “J. M. Coetzee: Fiction, History, Theory,” a graduate course in the English department and African Studies Program in Penn’s School of Arts & Sciences. There he found not only the affirmation he sought but also a deep fascination with the work of this Nobel Prize-winning South African-born novelist.

By Christina Cook

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194October 29, 2014

Epidemiological Study by Penn Vet Professor Investigates Parasite-Schizophrenia Connection

blurb: 
Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism.

Many factors, both genetic and environmental, have been blamed for increasing the risk of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Some, such as a family history of schizophrenia, are widely accepted. Others, such as infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite transmitted by soil, undercooked meat and cat feces, are still viewed with skepticism.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604November 5, 2014

Penn Bioengineer Looking for Epigenomic Patterns Linked to Neurological Disorders

blurb: 
Jennifer Phillips-Cremins was named a 2014 New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Stem Cell Investigator. The award will support the study of how the three-dimensional organization of DNA within cells directs the development of the human brain.

By Madeleine Stone @themadstone

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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194November 4, 2014

Penn-led Team Pieces Together Signaling Pathway Leading to Obesity

As scientists probe the molecular underpinnings of why some people are prone to obesity and some to leanness, they are discovering that weight maintenance is more complicated than the old “calories in, calories out” adage.