Research

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964June 11, 2015

Penn Medicine Study Shows First Signs that Drug Used to Treat ADHD May Improve Cognitive Difficulties for Menopausal Women

According to a new study, women experiencing difficulty with time management, attention, organization, memory, and problem solving – often referred to as executive functions – related to menopause may find improvement with a drug already being used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

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Media Contact:Katie Delach | katie.delach@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5964June 11, 2015

Penn Study Shows Nearly 10 Percent of Women Live Too Far from Access to Gynecologic Cancer Care

More than one-third of counties in the Unites States are located more than 50 miles from the nearest gynecologic oncologist, making access to specialty care for ovarian and other gynecologic cancers difficult for nearly 15 million women.

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Media Contact:Evan Lerner | elerner@upenn.edu | 215-573-6604June 10, 2015

Penn Researchers Show How Cells Solve Biochemical Challenges as They Get Bigger

blurb: 
Just as no two people are quite the same height and weight, a population of cells contains larger and smaller individuals. A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has now shown how the two copies of nuclear DNA in most cells’ chromosomes can serve a cell of any size.

By Madeleine Stone  @themadstone

In any textbook diagram, a group of red blood cells, skin cells or nerve cells will typically be identical in size. But, just as no two people are quite the same height and weight, in a population of real cells there are larger and smaller individuals.

Can Brain Games Change Behaviors Long Term?

June 7, 2015

Caryn Lerman of the Perelman School of Medicine and its Abramson Cancer Center, Leah Bernardo, also of Medicine, and Joseph Kable of the School of Arts & Sciences are highlighted for researching how Lumosity affects brain activity.

Article Source: Philadelphia Inquirer
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Media Contact:Katherine Unger Baillie | kbaillie@upenn.edu | 215-898-9194June 8, 2015

Evolution Is Unpredictable and Irreversible, Penn Biologists Show

blurb: 
A study by University of Pennsylvania biologists now provides evidence that, at the molecular level, evolution is both unpredictable and irreversible.

Evolutionary theorist Stephen Jay Gould is famous for describing the evolution of humans and other conscious beings as a chance accident of history. If we could go back millions of years and “run the tape of life again,” he mused, evolution would follow a different path. 

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Media Contact:Greg Richter | gregory.richter@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-614-1937June 4, 2015

Yoga, Running, Weight Lifting, and Gardening: Penn Study Maps the Types of Physical Activity Associated with Better Sleep Habits

Physical activities, such as walking, as well as aerobics/calisthenics, biking, gardening, golfing, running, weight-lifting, and yoga/Pilates are associated with better sleep habits, compared to no activity, according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Media Contact:Lee-Ann Donegan | leeann.donegan@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5660June 3, 2015

High Levels of Moral Reasoning Correspond with Increased Gray Matter in Brain

Individuals with a higher level of moral reasoning skills showed increased gray matter in the areas of the brain implicated in complex social behaviordecision making, and conflict processing as compared to subjects at a lower level of moral reasoning, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with a researcher from Charité Universitätsmediz in Berlin, Germany. 

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Media Contact:Greg Richter | gregory.richter@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-614-1937June 4, 2015

Eating Less During Late Night Hours May Stave off Some Effects of Sleep Deprivation, Penn Study Shows

Eating less late at night may help curb the concentration and alertness deficits that accompany sleep deprivation, according to results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania that will be presented at SLEEP 2015, the 29th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sle

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | Karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658June 4, 2015

Reverberations in Metabolism: Protein Maintains Double Duty as Key Cog in Body Clock and Metabolic Control, Penn Study Finds

Around-the-clock rhythms guide nearly all physiological processes in animals and plants. Each cell in the body contains special proteins that act on one another in interlocking feedback loops to generate near-24 hour oscillations called circadian rhythms.

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Media Contact:Karen Kreeger | karen.kreeger@uphs.upenn.edu | 215-349-5658June 3, 2015

Penn Researchers Home in on What's Wearing Out T Cells

Sometimes even cells get tired. When the T cells of your immune system are forced to deal over time with cancer or a chronic infection such as HIV or hepatitis C, they can develop "T cell exhaustion," becoming less effective and losing their ability to attack and destroy the invaders of the body.